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Heart Disease and Stroke: Why? Who? What? and How?

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Heart Disease and Stroke: Why? Who? What? and How? Emily Carlson Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program Utah Department of Health Who Am I? Who Are You? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Heart Disease and Stroke: Why? Who? What? and How?


1
Heart Disease and Stroke Why? Who? What? and How?
  • Emily Carlson
  • Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program
  • Utah Department of Health

2
Who Am I? Who Are You? Why Are We Here?
3
Outline of Presentation
  • Why does Heart Disease and Stroke Matter to you?
  • Who can help lower the risks of Heart Disease and
    Stroke for Your employees ?
  • What Can You Do Now?
  • How Do You Start?

4
Why does Heart Disease and Stroke Matter to you?
5
CAUSES of DEATH UTAH 2004
6
Your Employees Hearts
  • About 1 in 4 Americans have a cardiovascular
    condition.
  • Heart disease and stroke-related costs in the
    United States for 2005 are estimated at 393
    billion, and are expected to continue to rise.
  • American Heart Association. Heart disease and
    stroke statistics 2005 update. Dallas, TX 2005

7
Why Hearts Matter
  • In an analysis of insurance claims of about 4
    million individuals from large U.S. companies,
    annual average payments for heart related claims
    were 4,639 per patient, more than double the
    average payment of 2,230 for all conditions
    examined!
  • Goetzel, Journal of Occupational and
    Environmental Medicine, 45(1), 5-14, 1999.

8
Risk Factors You Cant Change
  • Age People over 55 are at greater risk of a
    stroke
  • Gender Men of any age, and postmenopausal women,
    have a greater risk.
  • Family History Heart disease tends to run in
    families and is more common among African
    Americans and Hispanics
  • Medical history Past history of heart problems
    or strokes

9
Risk Factors You Can Change
  • High cholesterol
  • (24.9 of adults in Utah)
  • High Blood Pressure (hypertension)
  • (21.9 of adults in Utah)
  • Smoking
  • (11.2 of adults in Utah)
  • Diabetes (uncontrolled)
  • (6.5 of adults in Utah have Diabetes)
  • Physical Inactivity
  • (46.2 of adults in Utah)
  • Overweight or Obesity
  • (58.2  of adults in Utah)

10
Other Contributing Factors
  • Birth control pills
  • Alcohol
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Stress

11
Signs and Symptoms of a Heart Attack
  • Chest discomfort- uncomfortable pressure,
    squeezing, fullness or pain.   
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body- pain
    or discomfort in one or both arms, the back,
    neck, jaw or stomach.   
  • Shortness of breath
  • Other signs- breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea
    or lightheadedness       

12
Signs and Symptoms of a Stroke
  • Sudden numbness or weakness especially on one
    side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or
    understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking, or dizziness
  • Sudden, severe headache with no known cause

13
Their Hearts, Your Bottom Line
  • Heart disease and stroke represent major costs to
    employers, including premature disability.
  • Employees with multiple risk factors, for heart
    disease and stroke - such as high blood pressure,
    high cholesterol, and smoking - are costly to
    employers. American Heart Association. Heart
    disease and stroke statistics 2005 update.
    Dallas, TX 2005

14
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15
Who can help lower the risks of Heart Disease and
Stroke for Your employees ?
16
Examples of National Promising Worksite Programs
  • Highsmith
  • Fieldale Farms
  • Duke University
  • Johnson Johnson

17
Examples of Local Promising Worksite Programs
  • Owners Resorts and Exchange
  • Cream O Weber
  • Salt Lake Valley Emergency Communications Center
  • WesTech Engineering

18
What Can You Do Now?
19
A comprehensive worksite program includes
  • Sustained individualized risk-reduction
    counseling
  • Lower-cost policy and environmental interventions
  • ..may be most effective to support
    healthy lifestyles and prevent heart disease and
    stroke Pelletier K, Am JOEM, 1997,
    vol 29(12)1154-1169
  • Heaney C. Goetzel RA. AJHP,
    199711290-307

20
Plant-wide Policy and Environmental Interventions
  • Smoke-free policies and tobacco cessation
    services
  • Health education classes and support groups with
    individual goal setting
  • Low-cost nutritious food in cafeterias and snack
    bars point-of-purchase information
  • Places for physical activity marked walking
    paths, signage to encourage stair use, health
    clubs/gyms

21
Plant-wide Policy and Environmental Interventions
  • Wellness messages-warning signs and symptoms of
    heart attack and stroke, and when to call 9-1-1
  • Incentives to engage in healthy behavior
  • Blood pressure monitors, CPR classes, Automated
    external defibrillators

22
How Do You Start?
23
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24
Six Steps
  1. Recognize costs
  2. Discover savings
  3. Learn from others
  4. Improve heart disease and stroke prevention at
    the worksite
  5. Work with your Health Plan
  6. Establish partnerships

25
Work With Your Health Plan
  • You can negotiate with your health plan,
    regardless of your size to ensure coverage of
    preventive services, and provision of quality
    care
  • What can the health plan offer to your company?
  • How can they support your heart disease and
    stroke prevention program?
  • How can you create a health benefits package to
    meet the needs of your employees?

26
Establish Partnerships
  • Partners can provide resources and solutions, and
    share their strengths and success stories
  • Who are the partners in your area?

27
Resources Available from HDSPP
  • www.hearthighway.org
  • Signs, Symptoms and Risk Factors of Stroke
    Educational Campaign
  • Information on AEDs and trainings
  • Insurance Evaluation
  • Lunch and Learn Class outlines
  • www.UtahWalks.org
  • 1-866-88-STROKE

28
(No Transcript)
29
Resources available from The Tobacco Prevention
and Control Program
  • Utah Tobacco Quit Line 1-888-567-TRUTH
  • Utah QuitNet www.utahquitnet.com
  • Materials (posters, brochures, etc.)
  • TPCP Website www.tobaccofreeutah.org

30
Other Bureau Contacts
  • Tobacco
  • Marci Nelson
  • (801) 538-7002
  • marcinelson_at_utah.gov
  • Diabetes
  • (801) 538-6141
  • http//health.utah.gov/diabetes/

31
Good Samaritan Act
  • A person who renders emergency care at or near
    the scene of, or during an emergency,
    gratuitously and in good faith, is not liable for
    any civil damages or penalties as a result of any
    act or omission by the person rendering the
    emergency care, unless the person is grossly
    negligent or caused the emergency.

32
My Contact Information
  • Emily Carlson
  • Phone 801-538-9209
  • emilycarlson_at_utah.gov

33
Thank You!!
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