5.5.2 recognize military and nonmilitary leaders from the North and South during the Civil War (i.e., Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, Chief Justice Roger Taney, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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5.5.2 recognize military and nonmilitary leaders from the North and South during the Civil War (i.e., Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, Chief Justice Roger Taney, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis)

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Title: 5.5.2 recognize military and nonmilitary leaders from the North and South during the Civil War (i.e., Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, Chief Justice Roger Taney, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis)


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5.5.2 recognize military and nonmilitary leaders
from the North and South during the Civil War
(i.e., Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, Chief
Justice Roger Taney, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S.
Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis)
Self-educated former slave who became a major
figure in the Abolitionist movement in the North
before the Civil War
3
5.5.2 recognize military and nonmilitary leaders
from the North and South during the Civil War
(i.e., Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, Chief
Justice Roger Taney, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S.
Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis)
Worked as a nurse on the battlefields during the
Civil War founded the American Red Cross in 1881.
4
5.5.2 recognize military and nonmilitary leaders
from the North and South during the Civil War
(i.e., Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, Chief
Justice Roger Taney, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S.
Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis)
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court at the time of
the Dred Scott Decision of 1857. Taney wrote the
majority opinion that slaves were not citizens
but were, instead, property of their masters and
could be transported anywhere in the U.S.
5
5.5.2 recognize military and nonmilitary leaders
from the North and South during the Civil War
(i.e., Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, Chief
Justice Roger Taney, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S.
Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis)
President of the U.S. during the Civil War -
author of the Gettysburg Address - issued the
Emancipation Proclamation - considered the
greatest President because he kept the Union
together - assassinated in 1865
6
5.5.2 recognize military and nonmilitary leaders
from the North and South during the Civil War
(i.e., Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, Chief
Justice Roger Taney, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S.
Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis)
Chosen by Lincoln to be Commander of all Union
Armies in 1864 - big victories at Ft Donelson,
Shiloh, and Vicksburg - wore Lee down in the last
year of the war with more manpower and supplies -
Fort Donelson - just down the road
7
5.5.2 recognize military and nonmilitary leaders
from the North and South during the Civil War
(i.e., Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, Chief
Justice Roger Taney, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S.
Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis)
Commander of the Army of Northern Virginia -
considered the greatest military leader (genius)
America has ever produced - loved to surprise the
enemy by flanking his troops -Major victories -
Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg - fought against
superior numbers and supplies of the Union. Kept
the South in the war at least 2 years longer than
it should have lasted. It is a good thing war is
so terrible or we should grow too fond of it.
8
5.5.3 interpret timelines that depict major
historical post-Civil War events
1865 Lincoln assassinated Civil War ends
1876 Alexander Graham Bell invents telephone
1880 Thomas Edison invents electric light
1886 American Federation of Labor founded
1889 Jane Addams founds Hull House
1914-1918 WW I in Europe - America enters 1917
1920 19th amendment - womens suffrage
1929 Stock Market Crash begins Depression
9
5.5.3 interpret timelines that depict major
historical post-Civil War events
1941 Japanese attack Pearl Harbor - U.S. enters WWII
1945 U.S. drops atomic bombs on Japan to end WWII
1954 Brown v. Board of Education - orders desegregation of public schools
1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott - Rosa Parks
1963 Martin Luther King, Jr. I Have a Dream Speech
1963 John F. Kennedy assassinated
1964 Civil Rights Act
1968 Assassinations of Robert Kennedy/ ML King, Jr.
10
5.5.4 recognize the rights that workers fought
for in the late 1800s (I.e., wages, hours,
insurance, and working conditions) During the
1830s and the 1840s, textile mill workers labored
an average of 16 to 18 hours a day. By 1865, the
length of the average workday was between 11 and
12 hours per day. Beginning in the early 1880s,
workers demanded a reduction in the workday to 10
hours. In a few cities, such as Chicago,
organized labor began agitating for the
now-standard 8 hour day. Some factory owners
agreed with such reforms. Most, however,
continued to believe that workers benefited
morally from the longer work day.
11
5.5.4 recognize the rights that workers fought
for in the late 1800s (I.e., wages, hours,
insurance, and working conditions)
12
5.5.4 recognize the rights that workers fought
for in the late 1800s (I.e., wages, hours,
insurance, and working conditions) The bulk of
the urban American population in 1890 was living
below the subsistence-level of income. The
average annual income for a family of four in
1890 was 380. That same year, however, the
Census Bureau estimated that a subsistence income
was 530.
13
5.5.4 recognize the rights that workers fought
for in the late 1800s (I.e., wages, hours,
insurance, and working conditions)
14
5.5.4 recognize the rights that workers fought
for in the late 1800s (I.e., wages, hours,
insurance, and working conditions)
15
5.5.4 recognize the rights that workers fought
for in the late 1800s (I.e., wages, hours,
insurance, and working conditions) INSURANCE?? Ce
rtainly not health insurance benefits in the
1800s. Most likely workers did ask for
compensation when they were injured on the job or
compensation to families for workers who were
killed.
16
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
17
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
18
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
Point to Make - larger families needed for
workers on farms and potential income - today
small families because we want to travel, have
better educations, working mothers
19
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
CARS for pleasure/travel
CARS to get to work
20
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
Faster transportation changed our perceptions of
distance
21
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
22
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
23
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
24
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
Rosie the Riveter World War II
25
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
Domestic goddess 1950s
26
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
Womens Movement 1960-1990s Equal Rights Equal
Pay Equal Opportunities
27
5.5.5 interpret a visual contrasting life before
and after WWII (I.e., education, family size,
transportation, urbanization, and the role of
women)
Working Mothers
28
5.5.6 determine the hardships encountered by
Great Plains settlers in the late 1800s (I.e.,
building materials, natural geography, climatic
conditions, isolated communities, lack of revenue)
SOD HOUSES Few trees on the Plains
29
5.5.6 determine the hardships encountered by
Great Plains settlers in the late 1800s (I.e.,
building materials, natural geography, climatic
conditions, isolated communities, lack of revenue)
FLAT TREELESS TYPICALLY DRY HARSH WINTERS WARM
SUMMERS
30
5.5.6 determine the hardships encountered by
Great Plains settlers in the late 1800s (I.e.,
building materials, natural geography, climatic
conditions, isolated communities, lack of revenue)
FLAT TREELESS TYPICALLY DRY HARSH WINTERS WARM
SUMMERS
31
5.5.6 determine the hardships encountered by
Great Plains settlers in the late 1800s (I.e.,
building materials, natural geography, climatic
conditions, isolated communities, lack of revenue)
Homesteads were 160 acre tracts - made for
isolated farms - very few towns - most activity
around RR towns
32
5.5.6 determine the hardships encountered by
Great Plains settlers in the late 1800s (I.e.,
building materials, natural geography, climatic
conditions, isolated communities, lack of revenue)
Homesteads were free if families stayed 5 years
and improved the land. Difficult land to farm.
RRs charged high rates to carry crops to market.
Threat of Indians. Drought. Money needed to
purchase equipment.
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