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Resource Unit: The Great Depression

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Title: Resource Unit: The Great Depression


1
Resource Unit The Great Depression
  • PowerPoint by
  • Zachary Hyden

2
Introduction
  • General Theme The Great Depression
  • Subject 10th grade American history
  • Participants Approximately 120, 10th grade
    American history students
  • When 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 7th periods between
    Thanksgiving and the Christmas breaks.
  • Location Fairborn High School Fairborn, Ohio
  • Duration This is a ten day unit that will span
    the entire 46 minute class period for each of
    those ten days.

3
Unit Objectives
  • Students will know
  • The causes of The Depression
  • How everyday life was affected by The Depression
  • The New Deal and pulling America out of the
    Depression
  • Impact of the New Deal
  • The beginning of World War II

4
NCSS Standards
  • I. Culture
  • II. Time, Continuity, and Change
  • III. People, Places, and Environments
  • IV. Individual Development and Identity
  • V. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions
  • VI. Power, Authority, and Governance
  • VII. Production, Distribution, and Consumption
  • VIII. Science Technology and Society
  • IX. Global Connections
  • X. Civic Ideals and Practices

5
Content Industrial Causes of The Great
Depression
  • Industries in Trouble
  • Railroads
  • Textiles
  • Steel
  • Coal
  • These once ultra-profitable industries were now
    facing hardships. Many of them barely made
    profits toward the end of the 1920s

6
Content Industrial Causes of The Great
Depression
  • Farmers may have taken the worst hit of all.
  • After World War I, demand fell but production
    didnt.
  • Farmers tried to produce more to re-gain their
    losses, but this only drove the prices farther
    down.
  • As farmers defaulted on their loans, local banks
    failed

7
Economic Reasons for the Great Depression
  • People have less money
  • Buying on Credit
  • Uneven Distribution of Income
  • Stock Market Crashes

8
Economic Reasons for the Great Depression
  • People Have Less Money
  • Rising Prices v. dormant wages
  • The rich are getting richer and the poor are
    getting poorer
  • Over-reliance on credit

9
Economic Reasons for the Great Depression
  • Buying on Credit
  • Buy now pay later mentality
  • Credit easily available
  • People went into massive debt
  • Businesses encouraged credit so they could sell
    more goods and make more profit.
  • These were not real profits though since no
    money had actually changed hands
  • People then stopped spending as much money when
    they realized that they were in so deep of debt.

10
Economic Reasons for the Great Depression
  • Distribution of Money
  • The rich got richer and the poor got poorer
  • A family needed 2,500 to live comfortably in the
    1920s.
  • Less than 30 of people made 2,500
  • Money became centralized at the top echelon of
    society

11
Economic Reasons for the Great Depression
  • Stock Market Crashes
  • In early September, the market peaked.
  • Black Thursday The market dropped dramatically
  • Black Tuesday 16.4 million shares were dumped
    off by investors trying to save what little money
    they could.

12
Economic Reasons for the Great Depression
  • Reasons for the Crash
  • Speculation High risk, High reward investing
  • Buying on Margin Buying a small percentage of a
    stock and putting the rest on credit
  • People hoped to hit it big on the market
  • People had no way to pay back the money for the
    stocks that they bought on credit.

13
Economic Reasons for the Great Depression
  • Ramifications of the Crash
  • General Panic
  • People lost trust in the banks pulled all their
    money.
  • Not everyone could get their money back
  • Banks had invested in the market
  • Banks were not insured by the federal government
  • The crash did not cause the depression, just sped
    the process up.

14
The World Wide Depression
  • The depression did not just hit the United
    States, but affected the World as a whole

15
Causes Reviewed
16
Vocabulary
  • Credit
  • Speculation
  • Buying on Margin
  • Black Tuesday
  • Black Thursday
  • Great Depression

17
Life During the Depression
  • Life in the Cities
  • Life in the Country
  • Family Life

18
Life During the Depression
  • Life in the Cities
  • Shantytowns
  • People built shacks for shelter when they lost
    their homes
  • Also known as Hoovervilles
  • Many people placed direct blame on President
    Hoover for the economic hardships that they were
    facing.
  • Soup Kitchens Bread Lines
  • Free or low cost foods
  • Came from charitable organizations

19
Life During the Depression
  • Life in the Country
  • Banks foreclosed
  • If the farmer could not make the payment, banks
    would take the farmers land and all the equity
    that the farmer had built.

20
Life During the Depression
  • Country Continued
  • Tenant Farming
  • an agricultural system in which landowners
    contribute their land and a measure of operating
    capital and management while tenants contribute
    their labour with various amounts of capital and
    management, the returns being shared in a variety
    of ways.
  • http//www.britannica.com/eb/article-9071664/tenan
    t-farming

21
Life During the Depression
  • Country Continued
  • Dust Bowl
  • The most visible evidence of how dry the 1930s
    became was the dust storm. Tons of topsoil were
    blown off barren fields and carried in storm
    clouds for hundreds of miles. Technically, the
    driest region of the Plains southeastern
    Colorado, southwest Kansas and the panhandles of
    Oklahoma and Texas became known as the Dust
    Bowl, and many dust storms started there. But the
    entire region, and eventually the entire country,
    was affected. http//livinghistoryfarm.org/farmin
    ginthe30s/water_02.html
  • Dustbowl Video

22
Life During the Depression
  • Family Life
  • Men
  • Were used to going to work and supporting a
    family
  • Many left home to find work
  • Term hobo originated during this time,
    describing men that would roam from town to town
    looking for work

23
Life During the Depression
  • Family Life
  • Women
  • Women kept the family together
  • Faced resentment for working outside of the home
  • Children
  • Poor diets, lack of medical attention, disease.
  • Schools closed
  • Young children left home to find work and to take
    the burden off of their family

24
Vocabulary
  • Shantytown/ Hooverville
  • Soup Kitchen
  • Bread Lines
  • Foreclosed
  • Tenant Farming
  • Dust Bowl
  • Hobo

25
The New Deal
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt
  • The New Deal
  • Alphabet Soup
  • Fireside Chats
  • Problems with the New Deal
  • Deficit Spending

26
The New Deal
  • F.D.R.
  • Elected President in 1932
  • Began working on his New Deal before he took
    office in 1933
  • 100 Days
  • Refers to the time period between March 9th and
    June 16th
  • Congress passed 15 pieces of new legislation

27
The New Deal
  • Alphabet Soup
  • This term was given to F.D.R.s programs due to
    their acronyms.
  • FDIC Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
  • SEC Securities and Exchange Commission
  • AAA Agricultural Adjustment Act
  • TVA Tennessee Valley Authority
  • CCC Civilian Conservation Corps
  • PWA Public Works Administration
  • NIRA National Industrial Recovery Act
  • CWA Civil Works Administration
  • NRA National Recovery Administration
  • HOLC Home Owners Loan Coporartion
  • FHA Federal Housing Act

28
The New Deal
  • Fireside Chats
  • F.D.R. would give speeches that were broadcasted
    over the radio and were known as Fireside Chats
  • These chats were aimed to ease the mind of the
    American Public and to let them know the progress
    that has been made and the future plans that
    would be implemented
  • Fireside Chat with F.D.R.

29
The New Deal
  • Problems with the New Deal
  • Deficit Spending
  • The national government was spending more money
    than they were making
  • Critics
  • Said that the new deal gave too much authority to
    the national government
  • Took away individual rights
  • Impeded Capitalism

30
Vocabulary
  • F.D.R.
  • 100 Days
  • New Deal
  • Alphabet Soup
  • Deficit Spending

31
Impact of the New Deal
  • The New Deal created jobs that provided the
    necessary encouragement, hope, value and
    self-esteem to assist the American people to
    recapture their economic values. It was the
    solution to the problems everyone was facing
    widespread unemployment, homelessness, and
    farmers losing their land and livestock.
    http//www.nps.gov/fdrm/generation/newdeal.htm

32
World War II
  • The United States enters the War
  • December 7th, 1941
  • A date which will live in infamy
  • F.D.R's Pearl Harbor Speech

33
Vocabulary
  • New Deal
  • December 7, 1941
  • Pearl Harbor Speech

34
Lesson 1 and 2
  • A pre-activity Quiz Run
  • Students will be given a pre-test the day before
    the unit starts over the Great Depression
  • The grades for these tests will not be recorded
    because they are a tool for the next days
    simulation
  • The next day I will re-distribute the graded
    tests and inform the students that I have lost
    over half the tests that were taken.
  • I will tell the students that they can not
    re-take the test since they already know the
    answers and those tests which I lost will go in
    the grade book as a zero.
  • Hopefully this will get an emotional reaction out
    of the students.
  • From there I will describe the concepts of
    bank-runs during the Great Depression
  • From here, the students should realize the
    concept that is being described.
  • NCSS Standards I, V, VI, VII

35
Activity 3
  • Web Quest
  • Students will be taken to the media center and
    given two days to finish the Web Quest that is
    provided with this link
  • Depression Web Quest
  • NCSS Standards I, II, III, V, VI, VII, VIII,
    IX, X

36
Lesson 4
  • Buy Me On Credit
  • I will make up 30 credit cards and distribute
    them to the class
  • I will give the students 300 Monopoly Money
  • I will give the students a list of goods that
    they can purchase with their credit cards which
    they will pay me for at a later date.
  • I will have the students write down all the goods
    they want and have them turn them in to me
  • These goods will range from a 25 toaster to a
    400 new Model T-Ford.

37
Lesson 4 continued
  • As the class progresses, I will slowly call in
    small amounts of money to simulate paying off the
    credit card on a monthly payment.
  • All at once, I will call in all the debt that the
    class has accumulated.
  • This should simulate the beginning of the
    economic crisis
  • This will also work in describing how buying on
    margin facilitated to crash of the stock market.
  • NCSS Standards I, II, IV, V, VIII

38
Lesson 5
  • The students will analyze this picture through
    the classroom smart board and write emotions that
    it evokes.
  • NCSS Standards I, III, IV, VII

39
Lesson 6
  • My family
  • The students will break off into families of
    three.
  • Each student will be designated a role with-in
    the family (Father, Mother, Child)
  • They will collaborate as a group and talk about
    the hardships that they face as individuals
  • From this collaboration, each member will write a
    one page paper describing his/her hardships and
    how the rest of the family is dealing with these
    hardships as a whole.
  • A rubric will be provided for this assignment
  • NCSS Standards I, II, III, IV, V, VII

40
Lesson 7
  • Listen To Me Closely
  • Students will listen to a fireside chat orated by
    F.D.R. two times
  • The first time just to hear his message
  • The second time to analyze his message
  • They will take this fireside chat and will write
    down what they believe he was trying to convey in
    his speech.
  • The students will also describe how this would
    have made them feel if they would have been alive
    during this time period.
  • The students will take their written responses
    and use them as a guided facilitator in a
    classroom discussion.
  • NCSS Standards I, II, III, VI, VIII

41
Lesson 8
  • Soups On!!!
  • Students will be asked to make a poster with as
    many acronyms as they can find from the New Deal.
  • The poster should contain between 8 and 10
    acronyms from the New Deal
  • They should write the entire name of the group
    next to the corresponding letters
  • Students should find pictures of the organization
    or something that they accomplished
  • Students will present their posters and they will
    be displayed around the classroom
  • NCSS Standards I, II, IV, V, VII, VIII, X

42
Lesson 9
  • Poetry/Music from the time
  • Primary literature Students will choose two of
    the three poems/songs below to read and analyze.
    They will be expected to use the S.O.A.P. model
    to dissect the poems and will turn their diagrams
    in for a grade.
  • NCSS Standards I, II, III, IV, VIII

43
Brother can you Spare a Dime?
  • Brother, Can You Spare a Dime," lyrics by Yip
    Harburg, music by Jay Gorney (1931)
  • They used to tell me I was building a dream, and
    so I followed the mob,
  • When there was earth to plow, or guns to bear, I
    was always there right on the job.
  • They used to tell me I was building a dream, with
    peace and glory ahead,
  • Why should I be standing in line, just waiting
    for bread?
  • Once I built a railroad, I made it run, made it
    race against time.
  • Once I built a railroad now it's done. Brother,
    can you spare a dime?
  • Once I built a tower, up to the sun, brick, and
    rivet, and lime
  • Once I built a tower, now it's done. Brother, can
    you spare a dime?
  • Once in khaki suits, gee we looked swell,
  • Full of that Yankee Doodly Dum,
  • Half a million boots went slogging through Hell,
  • And I was the kid with the drum!
  • Say, don't you remember, they called me Al it
    was Al all the time.
  • Why don't you remember, I'm your pal? Buddy, can
    you spare a dime?
  • Once in khaki suits, gee we looked swell,
  • Full of that Yankee Doodly Dum,
  • Half a million boots went slogging through Hell,
  • And I was the kid with the drum!
  • Say, don't you remember, they called me Al it
    was Al all the time.
  • Say, don't you remember, I'm your pal? Buddy, can
    you spare a dime?

44
Bowl of Cherries
  • "Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries," lyrics by Lew
    Brown, music by Ray Henderson (1931)
  • People are queer, they're always crowing,
    scrambling and rushing about
  • Why don't they stop someday, address themselves
    this way?
  • Why are we here? Where are we going? It's time
    that we found out.
  • We're not here to stay we're on a short holiday.
  • Life is just a bowl of cherries.
  • Don't take it serious it's too mysterious.
  • You work, you save, you worry so,
  • But you can't take your dough when you go, go,
    go.
  • So keep repeating it's the berries,
  • The strongest oak must fall,
  • The sweet things in life, to you were just loaned
  • So how can you lose what you've never owned?
  • Life is just a bowl of cherries,
  • So live and laugh at it all.
  • Life is just a bowl of cherries.
  • Don't take it serious it's too mysterious.
  • At eight each morning I have got a date,
  • To take my plunge 'round the Empire State.
  • You'll admit it's not the berries,
  • In a building that's so tall
  • There's a guy in the show, the girls love to
    kiss
  • Get thousands a week just for crooning like this
  • Life is just a bowl of . . . aw, nuts!
  • So live and laugh at it all!

45
Were in the Money
  • We're in the Money," lyrics by Al Dubin, music by
    Harry Warren (from the film Gold Diggers of 1933,
    1933)
  • We're in the money, we're in the money
  • We've got a lot of what it takes to get along!
  • We're in the money, that sky is sunny,
  • Old Man Depression you are through, you done us
    wrong.
  • We never see a headline about breadlines today.
  • And when we see the landlord we can look that guy
    right in the eye
  • We're in the money, come on, my honey,
  • Let's lend it, spend it, send it rolling along!
  • Oh, yes we're in the money, you bet we're in the
    money,
  • We've got a lot of what it takes to get along!
  • Let's go we're in the money, Look up the skies
    are sunny,
  • Old Man Depression you are through, you done us
    wrong.
  • We never see a headline about breadlines today.
  • And when we see the landlord we can look that guy
    right in the eye
  • We're in the money, come on, my honey,
  • Let's lend it, spend it, send it rolling along!
  • Oh, yes we're in the money, you bet we're in the
    money,
  • We've got a lot of what it takes to get along!
  • Let's go we're in the money, Look up the skies
    are sunny,
  • Old Man Depression you are through, you done us
    wrong.
  • We never see a headline about breadlines today.
  • And when we see the landlord we can look that guy
    right in the eye
  • We're in the money, come on, my honey,
  • Let's lend it, spend it, send it rolling along!

46
Lesson 10
  • Grapes of Wrath
  • The students will watch the Grapes of Wrath
  • Oklahoma in the Thirties is a dustbowl and
    dispossessed farmers migrate westward to
    California. After terrible trials en route they
    become little more than slave labor. Among the
    throng are the Joads who refuse to knuckle
    under. http//imdb.com/title/tt0032551/plotsummar
    y
  • Written by Ed Stephan stephan_at_cc.wwu.edu

47
Grapes continued
  • After watching the movie, students need to draw a
    picture, with color, depicting a scene in the
    movie they feel accurately represents this period
    in time. Supplies will be provided for the
    students
  • NCSS Standards I, II, III, V, VI, VII

48
Lesson 11
  • Opponents to Roosevelt
  • Many people felt that F.D.R. was trying to
    circumvent the power of the Supreme Court
  • This political cartoon depicts some of the
    feeling towards Roosevelt at this time
  • Students will be instructed to analyze this
    cartoon, which will be shown on the class room
    smart board and write bulleted responses about
    it.
  • After they have turned in their responses, they
    will be instructed to create their own political
    cartoon in opposition to the New Deal/F.D.R.
  • NCSS Standards I, V, VI

49
Lesson 11 continued
50
Lesson 12
  • Video Clips
  • Students will watch a variety of video clips from
    the internet that will be provided for them
    through the teachers projector monitor. The
    students will watch the clips and write a brief
    summary of what they saw, heard, and felt and how
    those emotions translate to the Great Depression
  • Depression 1
  • Depression 2
  • F.D.R.'s recovery plan
  • NCSS Standards I, II, III, IV, V

51
Instructional Resources
  • Teacher References
  • Class Notes. American history 10. Rob Banks.
    Fairborn High School, Fall 2007.
  • Class Notes. History 212. Dr. Jacob Dorn. Wright
    State University, Winter 2005.
  • Danzer, G., Klor de Alve, J., Krieger, L.,
    Wilson, L., Woloch, N. (2007). The Americans
    Reconstruction to the 21st century. Evanston, IL
    McDougal Littell.
  • Cassutto's, G. (2007). The alphabet soup of new
    deal agencies. Retrieved November 3, 2007 from
    http//www.cyberlearning-world.com/lessons/ushisto
    ry/newdealagencies.htm
  • Pojer, S. (2007). The Great Depression begins
    (1929 1933). Retrieved November 7, 2007 from
    http//historyteacher.net/AmericanHistoryAndGovern
    ment/Topics/Chapter22-TheGreatDepressionBegins.htm

52
Instructional Resources
  • Class Notes. American history 10. Rob Banks.
    Fairborn High School, Fall 2007.
  • These are notes that my cooperating teacher at
    Fairborn High School has provided me with. These
    resources included worksheets, PowerPoint
    presentations, chapter overviews, and assessment
    tools.

53
Instructional Resources
  • Class Notes. History 212. Dr. Jacob Dorn. Wright
    State University, Winter 2005.
  • This class gave a thematic survey of events,
    forces, groups, and individuals that contributed
    to and helped to shape an American civilization
    on the North American continent. It spanned the
    time period of 1877 to the present. These notes
    gave good background and in depth knowledge on
    the Great Depression.

54
Instructional Resources
  • Danzer, G., Klor de Alve, J., Krieger, L.,
    Wilson, L., Woloch, N. (2007). The Americans
    Reconstruction to the 21st century. Evanston, IL
    McDougal Littell.
  • This is the text book that is used for this
    particular history class. It covers American
    history from the end of the American Civil War
    through the beginning of the 21st century. The
    book is broken down into seven units and consists
    of twenty six chapters. The chapters used for
    this resource unit included the end of chapter 13
    (The Roaring Life of the 1920s) most of chapter
    14 (The Great Depression Begins), most of chapter
    15 (The New Deal), and the beginning of chapter
    16 (World War Looms). This tool provided very
    good background and activity ideas. It also gave
    ideas for assessment opportunities.

55
Instructional Resources
  • Cassutto's, G. (2007). The alphabet soup of New
    Deal agencies. Retrieved November 3, 2007 from
    http//www.cyberlearning-world.com/lessons/ushisto
    ry/newdealagencies.htm
  • This resource was pulled from the web and gave
    the idea for the Alphabet Soup of the New Deal
    game. The project listed in this resource unit is
    an adaptation that uses a more student centered
    style of learning.
  • Students will make a poster board depicting
    between 8 and 10 acronyms from the New Deal era.
    The students will tell what the acronym stands
    for, give a brief synopsis of what the group
    accomplished, and a draw/copy a picture of the
    group or an accurate representation of the group.

56
Instructional Resources
  • Pojer, S. (2007). The Great Depression begins
    (1929 1933). Retrieved November 7, 2007 from
    http//historyteacher.net/AmericanHistoryAndGovern
    ment/Topics/Chapter22-TheGreatDepressionBegins.htm
  • This website was rich with information,
    assessment ideas, and teaching tools. The website
    had a wide spectrum of history knowledge that
    spanned from American History, to European
    History, to Global Studies, to Advanced Placement
    European History. Each sub-category had syllabi,
    assignments, quizzes, web links, and review
    questions.
  • The link that I used was located under American
    History Government Main Page Chapter 22
    (The Great Depression Begins, 1929-1933)
  • This site gave sources, questions, terms, and
    quiz questions

57
Instructional Resources
  • Delong, J. (1997). Slouching towards utopia? The
    economic history of the twentieth century-XIV.
    The great crash and the great slump. Retrieved
    October 28, 2007 from http//econ161.berkeley.edu/
    TCEH/Slouch_Crash14.html
  • This site gives an immense amount of information
    and resources. It provides graphs as well as
    world background to the Great Depression. This
    site was developed by a professor at the
    University of California, Berkeley and has many
    different chapters at a persons disposal, not
    just material on the Great Depression.

58
Instructional Resources
  • Student References
  • Danzer, G., Klor de Alve, J., Krieger, L.,
    Wilson, L., Woloch, N. (2007). The Americans
    Reconstruction to the 21st century. Evanston, IL
    McDougal Littell.
  • This is the text book that is used for this
    particular history class. It covers American
    history from the end of the American Civil War
    through the beginning of the 21st century. The
    book is broken down into seven units and consists
    of twenty six chapters. The chapters used for
    this resource unit included the end of chapter 13
    (The Roaring Life of the 1920s) most of chapter
    14 (The Great Depression Begins), most of chapter
    15 (The New Deal), and the beginning of chapter
    16 (World War Looms). This tool provided very
    good background and activity ideas. It also gave
    ideas for assessment opportunities.

59
Instructional Resources
  • Kirk, K. (2005). The Great Depression treasure
    hunt. Retrieved November 7, 2007 from
    http//web.dps.k12.va.us/gibson/7th20Grade20Webp
    age20by20Kirk/Depression_Thunt.htm
  • This activity will get the students involved with
    the Great Depression through technology. The web
    quest has many links and educational tools that
    the students will benefit from. There are
    interactive questions as well as a work sheet
    that the students will use to guide their
    endeavors during the activity.

60
Instructional Resources
  • Gibson, K. Causes of the Great Depression.
    Retrieved November 7, 2007 from
    http//web.dps.k12.va.us/gibson/7th20Grade20Webp
    age20by20Kirk/Causes20of20the20Great20Depres
    sion_GO.gif
  • This is a very simple diagram that uses main
    ideas to help break down the causes of the Great
    Depression in a visual manner. Students could use
    this as a starting point and as time went on they
    could fill in details under each category.
    Students learn in many different ways, and the
    more diverse learning techniques that are
    implemented in the classroom the more students
    will benefit.

61
Instructional Resources
  • Delong, J. (1997). Slouching towards utopia? The
    economic history of the twentieth century-XIV.
    The great crash and the great slump. Retrieved
    October 28, 2007 from http//econ161.berkeley.edu/
    TCEH/Slouch_Crash14.html
  • This site gave a very informative graph that the
    students will use and analyze to show the effects
    of the Great Depression, not only in America but
    on a World Wide scale. Although this unit is
    geared toward an American history course, world
    wide context is always pertinent information.

62
Instructional Resources
  • Encyclopedia Britannica. (2007). Tenant farming.
    Retrieved November 3, 2007 from Encyclopedia
    Britannica Online http//www.britannica.com/eb/ar
    ticle-9071664
  • This gives students definitions that are more
    complete and easy to understand in a real world
    context compared to text-book definitions. This
    particular definition gave students insight into
    tenant farming and its impact in the 1930s.

63
Instructional Resources
  • Ganzel, B. Farming in the 1930sThe dust bowl.
    Retrieved November 2, 2007 from
    http//livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe30s/water
    _02.html
  • This website gives definitions and first hand
    video account of people who lived through the
    dust bowl and the experiences that they took from
    this time period.

64
Instructional Resources
  • Ibis Communications. (2007). History in motion
    The dust bowl 1936. Retrieved November 8, 2007
    from http//www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/himdustbow
    l.htm
  • This website gives first hand historical
    accounts. This particular video gives a good
    representation of what someone living through the
    dust bowl would have seen during one of the
    storms.

65
Instructional Resources
  • F.D.R. Memorial. (2004). A new deal. Retrieved
    November 8, 2007 from http//www.nps.gov/fdrm/gene
    ration/newdeal.htm
  • This website gives a very good overview of what
    the new deal was trying to accomplish and the
    goals that F.D.R. set out to accomplish. It is
    short but very concise. Students can read this
    and use it as a cheat sheet for quick reference.

66
Instructional Resources
  • Peters, G. (1999). Franklin D. Roosevelt First
    fireside chat (banking). Retrieved November 5,
    2007 from http//www.presidency.ucsb.edu/mediaplay
    .php?id14540admin32
  • This is a clip of F.D.R.s first fireside chat
    where he addressed the nation about banking. This
    resources allows the students not only to hear
    the words of F.D.R. but allows them to see the
    person as well. It is a first hand account and is
    a very good educational tool.

67
Instructional Resources
  • Eidenmuller, M. (2001). Franklin Delano
    Roosevelt Pearl Harbor address to the nation.
    Retrieved October 30, 2007 from
    http//www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/fdrpearlh
    arbor.htm
  • This website gives a first hand account of
    F.D.R.s speech to the nation. In addition to
    giving the audio, this website has a transcript
    of his speech so students can read along as
    F.D.R. is speaking.

68
Instructional Resources
  • Lavender, C. Songs of the Great Depression.
    Retrieved November 8, 2007 from
    http//www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/laven
    der/cherries.html
  • This website gives three examples of songs/poems
    that were written at this time. Although there is
    no audio streaming from this website, it would
    not be very difficult to find a copy of one of
    the songs for the students to listen to. Music
    often reflects the culture of a time period and I
    feel that these are three good reflections of the
    Great Depression.

69
Instructional Resources
  • Ford, J. (1940). The grapes of wrath (movie).
    Retrieved November 2, 2007 from
    http//imdb.com/title/tt0032551/
  • Oklahoma in the Thirties is a dustbowl and
    dispossessed farmers migrate westward to
    California. After terrible trials en route they
    become little more than slave labor. Among the
    throng are the Joads who refuse to knuckle under.
    plot summary
  • This movie will give students a different form of
    exposure to the hardships that people faced in
    the 1930s

70
Instructional Resources
  • Cassutto's, G. (2007). The alphabet soup of New
    Deal agencies. Retrieved November 3, 2007 from
    http//www.cyberlearning-world.com/lessons/ushisto
    ry/newdealagencies.htm
  • This resource was pulled from the web and gave
    the idea for the Alphabet Soup of the New Deal
    game. The project listed in this resource unit is
    an adaptation that uses a more student centered
    style of learning.
  • Students will make a poster board depicting
    between 8 and 10 acronyms from the New Deal era.
    The students will tell what the acronym stands
    for, give a brief synopsis of what the group
    accomplished, and a draw/copy a picture of the
    group or an accurate representation of the group.

71
Instructional Resources
  • What the president wants. This is a political
    cartoon that was pulled from the internet on
    November 4, 2007 from http//www.nisk.k12.ny.us/fd
    r/1937/37_scgifs/small/37021601.gif
  • This cartoon depicts Roosevelt trying to squash
    the Supreme Court with his New Deal. This cartoon
    shows the opposite side of what many students are
    taught about F.D.R. For most students F.D.R is
    portrayed as a knight in shining armor that
    rescued America from the Great Depression. This
    cartoon, and the activity that goes along with
    it, gives perspective to other points of view.

72
Instructional Resources
  • Library of Congress. (2007). Scenes from the
    Great Depression 1935-1945. Retrieved November
    5, 2007 from http//youtube.com/watch?vpgR2Buke5M
    Q
  • This gives a great picture show and has music
    from the time period in the background. This
    should get an emotional response from students.

73
Instructional Resources
  • (2007).The Great Depression (Britannica.com).
    Retrieved November 5, 2007 from
    http//youtube.com/watch?vTCNKq0-9p3w
  • This video shows the panic of the Stock Market
    crash in 1929. It gives first hand video of the
    panic in the streets as well as the ramifications
    felt worldwide.

74
Instructional Resources
  • (2007). U.S. thrilled as FDR outlines
    recovery,1933/10/23 (1933). Retrieved November 5,
    2007 from http//youtube.com/watch?vPXY7TkrPPzI
  • This is the actual video of a F.D.R. speech to
    the nation. He speaks about farm recovery, money
    security, and home foreclosure.

75
Assessments
  • Web Quest-20 points
  • Paragraph from picture-10 points
  • My Family Assignment-20 points
  • Fireside Chat Notes and Class Discussion -15
    points
  • Alphabet Soup Poster-20points
  • Poetry/Music S.O.A.P. 15 points
  • Grapes of Wrath Poster- 20 points
  • F.D.R. Political Cartoon 10 points for
    analysis 10 points for creating a new picture
  • Response to Video Clips 5 points for each video
    clip response (15 points total)
  • Unit Test 50 points

76
Unit Test Questions
  • Multiple Choice Questions
  • The strongest opposition to F.D.R.s New Deal
    came from?
  • Migrant Workers
  • Business Leaders
  • Factory Workers
  • Recent immigrants
  • In the 1930s, which geographic change most
    influenced the westward migration of thousands of
    people from the Southern Great Plains?
  • Extended drought in farming areas
  • Excessive flooding of the Mississippi
  • Earthquakes in Pacific coastal regions
  • Destructive hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico

77
Unit Test Questions
  • Multiple Choice Questions
  • 3. What event most closely associates with the
    end of the Great Depression?
  • Passage of the Social Security Act
  • Beginning of WWII
  • Re-election of F.D.R. in 1940
  • Announcement of the Marshall Plan
  • 4. The Dust Bowl experiences of the Oklahoma
    farmers during the Great Depression demonstrated?
  • The effect of geography on peoples lives
  • The success of government farm subsidies
  • The limitation of civil liberties during times of
    crisis
  • The result of the Indian Removal Act

78
Unit Test Questions
  • Short Answer
  • Give 3 examples of Alphabet Soup agencies. Give
    the acronym, the actual name, and something that
    the agency accomplished
  • How did the Dust Bowl impact farmers in Oklahoma?

79
Unit Test Questions
  • Extended Response
  • In four to six sentences, explain how the
    prosperity of the 1920s facilitated the economic
    collapse of the 1930s.

80
Intervention and Adaptation
  • Any student that needs interventions or
    adaptations will be accommodated. The student can
    sit closer to the front of the room to see the
    PowerPoint presentation more clearly. The student
    can be provided with audio equipment to hear
    lectures/audio clips more efficiently. Extra time
    will be granted for tests if need be. When
    needed, an intervention specialist will be
    provided. Extra time, or alternate assignments,
    will also be provided for reading and writing
    assignments for students who need it.

81
Reflection
  • Since I have been unable to implement this
    resource unit, I have no reflection at this time.
    In the future I hope to use this as an
    educational tool that facilitates learning in my
    classroom.
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