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Using Data to Set Priorities for Teaching and Learning HSTW Assessment

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Using Data to Set Priorities for Teaching and Learning HSTW Assessment Illinois State HSTW Data Workshop Bloomington, Illinois October 21-22, 2008 – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Using Data to Set Priorities for Teaching and Learning HSTW Assessment


1
Using Data to Set Priorities for Teaching and
Learning HSTW Assessment
  • Illinois State HSTW Data Workshop
  • Bloomington, Illinois
  • October 21-22, 2008

2
Welcome and Introductions Icebreaker
Metaphorical Thinking
  • Finish this sentence
  • A school without data is like a(n)
    __________________________________________________
    ____________ because _______________________.

3
Workshop Objectives
  • Understand the 2008 HSTW Assessment and
    Assessment Report
  • Use data to analyze your school/district/states
    challenges and develop an action plan for
    addressing those challenges
  • Develop a plan for engaging others in analyzing
    assessment results and using data to make change

4
The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB)
HSTW
  • Founded in 1948 to improve the plight of the
    south through a focus on education
  • Nonprofit, nonpartisan organization
  • Works with leaders and policy-makers in 16 member
    states
  • Provide data to legislatures and state boards of
    education for decision making
  • Focus on improving education pre-K through best
    practice
  • Network states

5
High Schools That Work and Making Middle Grade
Work
HSTW
  • HSTW is the largest and oldest of SREBs school
    improvement initiatives for secondary schools
  • 1987 27 HSTW sites
  • 2008 1,000 HSTW sites in 32 states
  • MMGW was founded to focus on middle grades issues
  • 1998 25 MMGW sites for research
  • 2001 MMGW opened to all
  • 2008 300 MMGW sites in 16 states

6
High Schools That Work (HSTW)
7
HSTW Key Practices
HSTW
  • High Expectations
  • Program of Study
  • Academic Studies
  • Career/Technical Studies
  • Work-Based Learning
  • Teachers Working Together
  • Students Actively Engaged
  • Guidance
  • Extra Help
  • Culture of Continuous Improvement

8
What Will it Take?
  • Improvement at the same time in both
  • Student achievement
  • Student completion rate
  • Truly use data for improvement
  • Process
  • Performance

9
Data Inquiry Process - Data Walk
  • Your facilitator will direct your group to a data
    poster.
  • We will rotate clockwise to posters. There are
    twelve different posters.
  • I will add information about the posters after
    each rotation.
  • As a group, try to determine How is the poster
    organized?

10
Data Inquiry Process
  • Rotate to the next poster.
  • There are multiple measures of data on these
    posters.
  • What types of data do you think were collected
    and analyzed to provide the information you see
    on the posters?

11
2008 HSTW Assessment
  • NAEP-like subject tests
  • Reading, Mathematics, Science
  • Scale 0-500
  • Student Survey
  • Course History
  • School and Classroom Experiences
  • Teacher Survey
  • Reports produced by Educational Testing Service
  • Data/Survey linked to HSTW Key Practices

12
Data Inquiry Process
  • Rotate to the next poster.
  • What are the subjects of this data set?
  • What is the purpose of this data set?

13
2008 Assessment Participation
  • 2008 HSTW Assessment
  • 1,048 schools
  • 61,234 students
  • 51,064 teachers
  • Given to seniors in even years
  • Sample of 60 per school
  • School improvement data

14
Data Inquiry Process
  • Rotate to the next poster.
  • Where are college-readiness indicators located on
    the posters?
  • Discuss your definitions of college-readiness.

15
Readiness Requirements
  • SAT scores
  • 500 or higher ready for college level work
  • Below 450 remediation
  • Select universities (1100 score for acceptance)
  • ACT College-readiness Benchmarks
  • English 18
  • Reading 21
  • Mathematics 22
  • Science 24
  • HSTW Readiness Goals
  • Reading 250
  • Mathematics 257
  • Science 258

16
Data Inquiry Process
  • Rotate to the next poster.
  • How does this data relate to other data your
    school typically reviews?
  • Whats the difference in the types of data on all
    these posters?
  • What is the value of using both types of results
    data?

17
Multiple Measures
Perceptions
School Processes
Student Achievement
Effort
Demographics
18
Data Inquiry Process
  • Rotate to the next poster
  • Predict your schools students responses
  • Top two
  • Bottom two

19
Data Inquiry Process
  • Rotate to the next poster. On the last rotation
  • Which of the indicators on your groups final
    poster do adults in the school community have
    control over?
  • Which indicators would it cost you money to
    change?

20
Debriefing the Data Walk
  • Process-performance data relationship
  • What can we control?
  • How much will it cost us to change?
  • Issues facing schools improving achievement and
    completion rate at the same time

21
Debriefing the Data Walk
  • What makes HSTW schools different?
  • Process v. Performance
  • Effort v. Ability
  • Successful schools are improving by focusing on
    things they control and influence
  • We must take ownership of what we can control.

22
The Essential Question
HSTW
  • Why do students at most-improved schools make
    greater gains in achievement than students at
    non-improved schools?

23
The Detailed Answer
  • More students at most-improved schools
  • Completed the HSTW-recommended curriculum in
    reading, math and science
  • Experienced high expectations in the classroom
  • Experienced reading, writing and math skills
    across the curriculum
  • Were engaged in science
  • Experienced quality career/technical studies and
    work-based learning
  • Had access to quality extra help and guidance
  • Understood the importance of learning and doing
    well in high school

24
The Short Answer
HSTW
  • The most-improved schools more fully implemented
    the HSTW design.
  • They took action to increase student achievement.

25
Interpreting the 2008 HSTW Assessment
26
2008 HSTW Assessment
  • NAEP-like subject tests
  • Reading, Mathematics, Science
  • Student Survey
  • Course History
  • School and Classroom Experiences
  • Teacher Survey
  • Administered to all or a random sample of 60
    seniors in January 2008
  • Comprehensive report disaggregating achievement
    by school/classroom practices

27
2008 Assessment Participation
  • 2008 HSTW Assessment
  • 1,048 schools
  • 61,234 students
  • 51,064 teachers
  • 2008 Middle Grades Assessment
  • 309 schools
  • 18,300 students
  • 10,758 teachers

28
2008 HSTW Assessment Results All Sites
55
53
51
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
29
2008 HSTW Assessment Results All Illinois Sites
66
59
61
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
30
2008 HSTW Assessment Results
HSTW Goal 85
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
31
Report Format
  • Executive Summary (pg. 1-2)
  • Overview (pg. 3-24)
  • Full Report
  • Indices (pg. 25-36)
  • Benchmarks (pg. 37-57)
  • Student survey results (pg. 58-209)
  • Teacher survey results (pg. 210-241)
  • Appendix (pg. 242-258)

32
Test Development
  • Why revise the assessment?
  • Refresh subject tests
  • Add utility
  • Purpose
  • Continue measuring continuous school improvement
  • Add measure of student college- and
    career-readiness

33
Test Development
  • Determine broad guidelines
  • Specify content to be included
  • Develop and review test questions
  • Write performance level descriptors
  • Review performance level descriptors
  • Administer assessment
  • Standard setting workshop
  • Research and validity studies

34
Test Content
  • Reading
  • 80 informational texts 20 literary nonfiction
  • Includes meaning vocabulary
  • Includes paired texts (to assess critical
    analysis)
  • Does not include literary fiction or poetry

35
Test Content
  • Mathematics
  • 10 - Number Properties and Operations
  • 30 - Measurement/Geometry
  • 25 - Data Analysis, Statistics and Probability
  • 35 - Algebra

36
Test Content
  • Science
  • 40 - Life science
  • 40 - Physical science
  • 20 - Earth and space science

37
Test Details
  • Reading
  • 90 minutes in length
  • 5 passages, 46 MC questions, 2 CR questions
  • Mathematics
  • 70 minutes in length
  • 50 MC questions and 2 CR questions
  • Graphing calculator for some questions
  • Science
  • 70 minutes in length
  • 50 MC questions and 2 CR questions

38
Standard Setting
  • What is a cut score?
  • The minimum test score a student must earn to be
    considered at a certain performance level
  • Three cut scores result in four levels of
    performance.

below Basic
Proficient
Advanced
Basic
Cut Score A
Cut Score B
Cut Score C
39
Standard Setting
  • Finding the target student

Basic Proficient
Target Basic Student
40
Standard Setting
Reading Mathematics Science
Basic 250-271 257-291 258-285
Proficient 272-301 292-318 286-310
Advanced 302-500 319-500 311-500
Students scoring below 250 in reading, 257 in
mathematics or 258 in science are considered to
be performing below the Basic level.
41
Test Scores
  • All three tests are scored on a scale of 0 to
    500.
  • Scores are not comparable across subject areas
    (i.e., a score of 270 in reading is not the same
    as a 270 in mathematics).
  • Students performing below a 250 in reading, 257
    in mathematics or 258 in science are considered
    performing below the Basic level in that subject
    area.
  • The readiness goals are set at the basic level in
    each subject area (reading 250 mathematics
    257 science 258).

42
Performance Level Descriptors
  • Pages 11-13
  • Read the basic, proficient and advanced
    descriptors for each subject test
  • In 2 or 3 sentences, describe what it means for a
    student to achieve in each level

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Interpreting Scores
  • Raw scores mapped to scale scores

Raw Scale
0 0
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2 66
. .
. .
. .
52 368
53 407
54 500
44
Interpreting Scores
  • No direct comparisons of test scores!!!
  • Or the percentage of students meeting readiness
    goals
  • Or the percentage of students at each performance
    level
  • But you can compare survey data!!!

45
Interpreting Scores
  • Page 14
  • Take 5 minutes to discuss these scenarios at your
    table. Then well discuss as a group.

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Interpreting Scores
  • I had 28 students earn the HSTW Award of
    Educational Achievement in 2006. That number
    decreased to 15 in 2008. Does that mean these
    students didnt perform as well?

Not necessarily!
47
Interpreting Scores
  • The reading goal went from 279 in 2006 to 250 in
    2008. Does that mean it is easier to meet the
    goal?

No! New tests and new standards Theyre just
different!
48
Interpreting Scores
  • Our schools 2008 mean math score is 267. It was
    298 in 2006. Does that mean we did worse?

No! We need to look at the concordance tables to
find out.
49
Interpreting Scores
  • We do have a way to estimate change in
    performance from 2006 to 2008 by using the
    concordance tables produced by ETS.

50
BREAK
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51
Using Concordance Tables to Estimate Change in
Achievement
52
Concordance Tables
  • Relate the performance of two different
    assessments of the same general content (e.g.,
    the SAT and the ACT tests)
  • Provide an estimate of how achievement changed
    from 2006 to 2008

53
Concordance Tables
  • Keep in mind
  • The scores from the 2006 and 2008 assessments are
    not interchangeable because
  • The test content changed from 2006 to 2008
  • The 2008 scales could not be equated to the 2006
    scales
  • The 2008 assessment is on a new reporting scale

54
Concordance Tables
  • Keep in mind
  • The concordance tables are not comparable across
    content areas
  • Student performance could have changed, but the
    change is not measurable because the same
    students did not take both assessments (2006 and
    2008)

55
(No Transcript)
56
Concordance Tables
  • To evaluate the sites overall mean scores
  • Obtain the overall subject mean score from 2006
    (from 2006 report)
  • Using that subjects concordance table, locate
    the 2006 mean score in the 2006 score column.
  • Read across the row of the table to find the
    corresponding score from the 2008 assessment.
  • Use this number to make an approximate comparison.

57
Concordance Tables
  • To evaluate the sites performance relative to
    the HSTW network
  • Obtain the overall subject mean score from 2006
    (from 2006 report)
  • Using that subjects concordance table, locate
    the 2006 mean score in the 2006 score column and
    locate the percentile that corresponds to the
    mean.
  • Obtain the overall subject mean score for 2008.
  • Using that subjects concordance table, locate
    the 2008 mean score in the 2008 score column and
    locate the percentile that corresponds to the
    mean.
  • The difference in the two percentiles will
    indicate whether the sites mean has increased or
    decreased relative to the HSTW network.

58
Concordance Tables
  • Example
  • 2006 Mean Reading Score 262
  • 2008 Mean Reading Score 244
  • If you compared them directly, you would think
    reading achievement decreased by 18 points. But
    is that accurate? Lets check the concordance
    table

59
228 lt 244 (2006 estimate) (2008
mean)
Increased from the 25th percentile in 2006 to the
41st percentile in 2008! Achievement increased
more than the network as a whole.
262 228
Reading achievement has improved!!!
60
Concordance Tables
  • Page 20
  • Use the concordance tables to estimate the change
    in achievement for your school/district/state
    from 2006 to 2008.

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61
Utilizing the Executive Summary
62
Approaching the Report
  • Before analyzing data, ask yourself who
    participated in this assessment?
  • Random sample or all students?
  • Career/technical or all students?
  • Who completed the assessment?
  • Page 59 of assessment report
  • What is your category?

63
Executive Summary
  • Now that we know who participated, how did we do
    overall?

64
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65
(No Transcript)
66
Utilizing the Executive Summary Pairs Check
a Name ____________ Name ____________ Date
____________ Date ____________
1 a
2 a
3 a
4 a
5 a
Sponge Sponge a
67
Executive Summary
  • Pages 21-22
  • Use the executive summary to obtain an overall
    picture of your school/district/states
    performance.

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Share
  • What value does this data provide?
  • How can you use this executive summary in your
    school/district/state?

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Utilizing the Overview
71
Overview
  • Now that weve gotten a picture of overall
    performance, where can I get some more details?

72
(No Transcript)
73
(No Transcript)
74
Overview
  • Pages 23-29
  • Use the overview to obtain a more detailed
    picture of your school/district/states
    performance.

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Share
  • Did you notice anything interesting in this data
    that you want to explore further?
  • If you could increase one or two indices by 20 or
    30 percent over the next two years, which ones
    would have the greatest impact on student
    achievement and the other indices?

76
Getting Students to Take a Rigorous Curriculum
77
Key Practice Program of Study
HSTW
Have students complete a challenging program of
study with an upgraded academic core and a
concentration.
78
HSTW Recommended Curriculum
HSTW
  • Four credits in college-prep/honors English
  • Students read 8-10 books a year
  • Students write weekly
  • Students complete at least one major research
    paper
  • Four mathematics credits Algebra I, geometry,
    Algebra II and above
  • Three lab-based science credits at the
    college-prep level four credits with a block
    schedule
  • Three credits of social studies four credits
    with a block schedule
  • Mathematics and science in the senior year

79
Recommended Concentrations
HSTW
  • Mathematics/science four credits in each field,
    with at least one at the Advanced Placement level
  • Humanities four credits each in college-prep
    level language arts and social studies, with at
    least one at the college level and four
    additional credits from foreign language, fine
    arts, journalism, debate, music, etc.
  • Career/technical four credits in a planned
    sequence of courses within a broad career field
    pre-engineering, health/medical science,
    construction, etc.

80
HSTW-Recommended Curriculum and Academic
Achievement
HSTW
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
81
HSTW-Recommended Curriculum and Academic
Achievement - Illinois
HSTW
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
82
Which Actions Can You Take to Get Students to
Take the Right Courses?
HSTW
  • Enroll ALL students in the core
  • Eliminate 15-20 percent of low-level
    courses/sections annually to enroll more students
    in higher level courses
  • Investigate alternative schedules to allow more
    time for students to take critical courses
  • Use the core as the default curriculum
  • Get guidance staff on board

83
Which Actions Can You Take to Get Students to
Take the Right Courses?
HSTW
  • Raise graduation requirements
  • Strengthen guidance and advisement - involve
    parents
  • Develop student handbook with career pathways and
    related course of study
  • Eliminate smorgasbord scheduling
  • Use guest speakers, hold career expos and college
    fairs
  • Establish small learning communities

84
Standards-Based Reform
HSTW
  • The quality and intensity of the high school
    curriculum are powerful predictors of success in
    college
  • Preparedness for postsecondary education depends
    on
  • specific courses taken
  • rigor of the curriculum
  • quality of the instruction
  • effort of the student

85
Activity
HSTW
  • Using your schools data, complete tables on
    pages 31-32 in your participant guide.
  • Using your results, answer the questions on pages
    32-33.

86
Review
HSTW
  • What does this type of curriculum data tell us
    about our schools?
  • How can this data be used to impact student
    achievement?
  • What actions can be taken to increase the numbers
    of students taking a rigorous college-prep
    curriculum?

87
BREAK
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1000
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500
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400
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310
320
010
009
008
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003
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STOP
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019
018
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016
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88
High Expectations and Extra Help
89
HSTW Key Practices Motivate more students to
meet high expectations by integrating high
expectations into classroom practices and giving
students frequent feedback. Provide a
structured system of extra help to enable
students to meet higher standards.
HSTW
90
Agreeing on A-, B- and C-level Work Suggested
Strategies
  • Use basic, proficient and advanced
  • NAEP National Readiness Standards
  • Use select universities, regional universities,
    community college and high school graduation
  • Use procedural/comprehension, application/analysis
    , and synthesis/evaluation
  • Intellectual (Webb/Bloom)

91
Emphasize College Readiness Requirements
  • SAT scores
  • 500 or higher ready for college level work
  • Below 450 remediation
  • Select universities (1100 score for acceptance)
  • ACT College-Readiness Benchmarks
  • English 18
  • Reading 21
  • Mathematics 22
  • Science 24

92
Actions for Defining the Amount and Quality of
Work Expected
HSTW
  • Benchmark assignments and assessment to
    proficient level/grade level
  • Develop common course syllabi, rubrics and
    end-of-course exams
  • A, B, C, Not-yet grading scale

93
High Expectations
HSTW
  • Teachers often clearly indicated the amount and
    quality of work that are necessary to earn a
    grade of A or B at the beginning of a project or
    unit.
  • Teachers were frequently available before, during
    or after school to help them with their studies.
  • Usually spent one or more hours on homework each
    day.
  • Often revised essays or other written work
    several times to improve their quality.
  • Often worked hard to meet high standards on
    assignments.

94
Emphasis on High Expectations
?
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
95
Emphasis on High Expectations - Illinois
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
96
Emphasis on High Expectations
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
97
Sticking to ExpectationsActions for Revising
Work
  • Three-week assessment
  • Requiring extra help for those not meeting
    standards
  • Teachers do not let students get by without doing
    work

98
Extra Help
HSTW
  • Often able to get extra help from teachers when
    needed without difficulty.
  • Teachers are frequently available before, during
    or after school to help them with their studies.
  • Extra help received often helps them to
    understand their schoolwork better.
  • Extra help received often helps them get better
    grades.

99
Emphasis on Extra Help
?
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
100
Emphasis on Extra Help - Illinois
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
101
Emphasis on Extra Help
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
102
A Comprehensive Extra Help Program Must Include
HSTW
  • Continuous extra help to meet standards
  • Middle grades actions
  • Ninth-grade transition
  • High school, postsecondary and careers
    transitions
  • Develop independent learners

103
Activity
HSTW
  • Using your schools data, complete tables on
    pages 35-36.
  • Using your results, answer the questions on pages
    37-38.

104
Review
HSTW
  • What does this type of data tell us about our
    schools?
  • How can this data be used to impact student
    achievement?
  • What actions can be taken to increase the
    expectations of students and the numbers of
    students receiving quality extra help?

105
Quality Career/Technical Studies and Work-Based
Learning
106
HSTW
HSTW CT Key Practices
Provide more students access to intellectually
challenging career/technical studies in
high-demand fields that emphasize the
higher-level mathematics, science, literacy and
problem-solving skills needed in the workplace
and in further education. Enable students and
their parents to choose from programs that
integrate challenging high schools studies and
work-based learning and are planned by educators,
employers and students.
107
Top 5 Mean Reading Scores by CT Field
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
108
Top 5 Mean Math Scores by CT Field
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
109
Top 5 Mean Science Scores by CT Field
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
110
Top 5 Completing the Recommended Curriculum by CT
Field
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
111
Quality C/T Studies
HSTW
  • Read non-school-related materials outside of
    class for one or more hours in a typical week.
  • Used math to complete challenging assignments in
    career/technical classes at least weekly.
  • Read and interpreted technical books/manuals in
    career/technical classes at least weekly.
  • Read a career-related article and demonstrated
    understanding at least monthly.
  • Used computer skills to complete assignments in
    CT at least monthly.

112
Quality C/T Studies (continued)
HSTW
  • Had challenging assignments in CT at least
    monthly.
  • Completed a project requiring research and plan.
  • Had to meet standards on a written exam to pass
    CT course.
  • Completed a senior project.
  • Spoke or visited with someone in a career they
    aspire to.
  • Spent time on CT homework each day.

113
Emphasis on Quality Career/Technical Studies
?
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
114
Emphasis on Quality Career/Technical Studies -
Illinois
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
115
Emphasis on Quality Career/Technical Studies
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
116
Integrating Academics into CT Studies
HSTW
  • Career/technical teachers often stressed reading.
  • Career/technical teachers often stressed writing.
  • Career/technical teachers often stressed
    mathematics.
  • Used math to complete challenging assignments at
    least weekly.
  • Read and interpreted technical books and manuals
    at least weekly.
  • Used computer skills to complete an assignment or
    project at least weekly.

117
Emphasis on Integrating Academics into CT
?
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
118
Emphasis on Integrating Academics into CT -
Illinois
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
119
Emphasis on Integrating Academics into CT
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
120
Conditions for Supporting Integration
HSTW
  • Common planning time
  • Standards-based, not activity-based
  • Create organizational structure that will support
    teacher collaboration
  • Provide large blocks of instructional time for
    completion of complex tasks
  • Provide professional development to support
    teachers
  • Establish clear expectations for teachers
    Collaboration by invitation does not work

121
Quality Work-Based Learning
HSTW
  • Observed veteran workers performing certain jobs.
  • Had someone teach them how to do the work.
  • Employers encouraged them to develop good work
    habits at least monthly.
  • Employers encouraged them to develop good
    customer relations skills at least monthly.

122
Emphasis on Work-Based Learning
?
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
123
Emphasis on Work-Based Learning - Illinois
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
124
Emphasis on Work-Based Learning
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
125
Activity
HSTW
  • Using your schools data, complete tables on
    pages 40-42.
  • Using your results, answer the questions on pages
    43-44.

126
Review
HSTW
  • What does this type of data tell us about
    career/technical studies and work-based learning
    in our schools?
  • How can this data be used to impact student
    achievement?
  • What actions can be taken to increase the quality
    of C/T studies and work-based learning?

127
Day One Exit Ticket
HSTW
  • Use the  ? card found on page 47.
  • Please write down the positives ( ) and the
    questions (?) you have from day one and give them
    to the presenter as you leave.

128
Welcome to Day Two!
129
Review of Day One
HSTW
  • Using Data to Take Action
  • Interpreting the 2008 HSTW Assessment
  • Using Concordance Tables to Estimate Change in
    Achievement
  • Utilizing the Executive Summary
  • Utilizing the Overview
  • Rigorous Curriculum
  • High Expectations and Extra Help
  • Quality CT Studies and Work-Based Learning

130
Questions from Day One
  • ???

131
Plan for Day Two
  • Quality Instruction
  • Guidance and Transitions
  • Leadership and School Improvement
  • Developing an Action Plan
  • Using data to identify challenges
  • Developing a plan to address challenges
  • Engaging others in using data and taking action

132
Quality Instruction
133
HSTW Key Practices
HSTW
  • Engage students in academic and career/technical
    classrooms in rigorous and challenging
    assignments using research-based instructional
    strategies and technology.

134
Engaging Students in Relevant Instruction
HSTW
  • Provide teams of teachers from several
    disciplines the time and support to work together
    to help students succeed in challenging academic
    and career/technical studies.
  • Integrate reading, writing and speaking as
    strategies for learning in all parts of the
    curriculum and integrate mathematics and science
    in career/technical classrooms.

135
SREBs Literacy Goals
HSTW
  • Students will read the equivalent of 25 books per
    year across the curriculum.
  • Students will write weekly in all classes.
  • Students will use reading and writing strategies
    to help them understand and use the content of
    all classes.
  • Students will write investigative research papers
    in all classes.
  • Students will be taught as if they were in honors
    language arts classes.

136
Literacy Across the Curriculum
HSTW
  • Often use word-processing software to complete
    assignments.
  • Often revise written work to improve quality.
  • Sometimes or often write in-depth explanations
    about projects.
  • Discuss or debate with others about what they
    read at least monthly.
  • Read and interpret technical books in CT at least
    monthly.
  • Read an assigned book demonstrate understanding
    at least monthly.
  • In a typical week, read non-school materials
    outside of class for two or more hours.
  • Complete graded short writing assignments in
    English at least monthly.
  • Complete graded short writing assignments in
    science at least monthly.
  • Complete graded short writing assignments in
    social studies at least monthly.

137
Emphasis on Literacy
?
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
138
Emphasis on Literacy - Illinois
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
139
Emphasis on Literacy
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
140
Numeracy Across the Curriculum
HSTW
  • Took a math class during the senior year.
  • Took at least four math courses in grades 9-12.
  • Math teachers sometimes or often show how math
    concepts are used to solve problems in real-life
    situations.
  • Use a graphing calculator to complete assignments
    at least monthly.
  • Complete a math project using math in a way that
    would be used in a work setting at least monthly.
  • Orally defend a process used to solve a problem
    at least monthly.
  • Worked with other students on a challenging math
    assignment group and individual grade at least
    monthly .
  • Worked in groups to brainstorm how to solve a
    problem at least monthly.
  • Solved math problems with more than one possible
    answer at least monthly.
  • Solved non-textbook math problems at least
    monthly.
  • Used math to complete CT assignments at least
    monthly.

141
Emphasis on Numeracy
?
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
142
Emphasis on Numeracy - Illinois
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
143
Emphasis on Numeracy
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
144
Engaging Science Experiences
HSTW
  • Completed three or more CP physical science, CP
    biology/biology 2, anatomy, CP chemistry, physics
    or AP science
  • Science teachers often show them how concepts are
    used to solve problems in real-life situations.
  • Took a science class during the senior year.
  • Use science equipment to do science activities in
    a laboratory with tables and sinks at least
    weekly.
  • Read an assigned article or book (other than
    textbook) dealing with science at least monthly.
  • Use science equipment to do science activities in
    a classroom at least monthly.
  • Work with other students on a challenging science
    assignment at least monthly.
  • Prepare a written report of lab results at least
    monthly.

145
Emphasis on Engaging Science
?
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
146
Emphasis on Engaging Science - Illinois
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
147
Emphasis on Engaging Science
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
148
Actions for Engaging Students in Research-Based
Instructional Strategies
HSTW
  • Project-based learning
  • Cooperative learning
  • Student-designed research
  • Integrated, interdisciplinary studies
  • Integrating Technology
  • Effective direct instruction

149
How will you improve the quality of instruction?
  • Focus on Improving Professional Practice
  • Common Planning Time
  • Integration
  • Common Unit Planning, Syllabi, Exams, etc.
  • Peer Observations
  • Demonstration Classrooms
  • Professional Development Follow-up
  • Marzanos Classroom Instruction that Works
  • Kagan Strategies
  • Team Teaching/Buddy Teaching
  • Teacher Evaluation Annual Plan for Improving

150
Activity
HSTW
  • Using your schools data, complete the tables and
    answer the questions on pages 48-54.

151
Review
HSTW
  • What does this type of data tell us about quality
    instruction in our schools?
  • How can this data be used to impact student
    achievement?
  • What actions can be taken to increase the quality
    of instruction?

152
Guidance and Transitions
153
Key Practice Guidance and Advisement Involve
students and parents in a guidance and advisement
system designed to ensure that students complete
an accelerated academic program of study and a
major.
HSTW
154
Providing Timely Guidance
HSTW
  • Reviewed the sequence of courses they planned to
    take at least once a year.
  • Received the most helping in planning their h.s.
    education plan by the end of 9th grade.
  • When planning and reviewing their four-year plan,
    talked with parents at least once a year.
  • A teacher/counselor talked to them individual
    about plans for after high school.
  • Spoke with or visited someone in a career they
    aspire to.
  • Someone from a college talked to them about going
    to college.
  • Received information about applying to college.
  • Had an adult mentor all four years.

155
Emphasis on Guidance
?
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
156
Emphasis on Guidance - Illinois
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
157
Emphasis on Guidance
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
158
Emphasis on Perceived Importance of High School
HSTW
  • Their courses are sometimes or often exciting and
    challenging.
  • They often try to do their best work in school.
  • They never or seldom fail to complete or turn in
    their assignments.
  • Most of their teachers often encourage them to do
    well in school.
  • Their teachers often care about them enough that
    they will not let them get by without doing the
    work.
  • It is very important to study hard to get good
    grades.
  • It is very important to participate actively in
    class.
  • It is very important to attend all of their
    classes.
  • It is very important to take a lot of
    college-preparatory classes.

159
Emphasis on Perceived Importance
?
?
?
?
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment
160
Emphasis on Perceived Importance - Illinois
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Illinois Sites
161
Emphasis on Perceived Importance
Source 2008 HSTW Assessment, All Sites
162
Why target middle school transition?
HSTW
  • The transition point from middle school to high
    school has the highest percentages of dropouts
    nation wide.
  • The highest failure rate occurs in grade nine.
  • Preparing students for high school work, directly
    impacts retention.

163
How can school leaders make sure that students
are ready for rigorous high school studies?
HSTW
  • District, high school and middle school leaders
    can
  • Establish readiness indicators for challenging
    high school English, mathematics and science
    courses
  • Align curriculums, teacher assignments and
    assessments to the readiness indicators and
  • Set goals to annually increase the percentages of
    students having successfully completed Algebra I
    by the end of grade eight.

164
Actions for Transition from Middle Grades to High
School
HSTW
  • Structured extra help programs in grades 7 and 8
  • 4 to 6 week summer bridge program for students
    who need accelerated instruction in math, English
    and reading
  • Develop courses in grades seven and eight to give
    extended time to read, write and do math

165
Actions for Transition from Middle Grades to High
School Continued
HSTW
  • Orient students and parents to high school
    expectations
  • Reduce the ratio of students to teachers in grade
    nine
  • Get a master teacher to lead a team of teachers
    in core academic courses in grade nine

166
What makes a high quality Ninth-grade Redesign
program?
HSTW
  • Early identification of students
  • A lower student-teacher ratio in grade nine
  • Qualified teachers with depth of content
    knowledge teach challenging content
  • School schedules that allow students to be
    double-dosed English/reading and mathematics
  • A career exploratory course for ninth-graders

167
What makes a high quality Ninth-grade Redesign
program?
  • Catch-up courses with standard-based Curriculum
    and unit planning by teachers
  • Ninth-grade Academies where teachers are
    organized into common planning teams
  • Recruitment of the best teachers to lead the
    ninth-grade teams
  • Movement beyond remedial instruction
  • Comprehensive evaluation plan

168
Why target postsecondary transition?
HSTW
  • Senior year not taken seriously
  • Low ACT and SAT scores
  • High remedial rate in English and mathematics
  • Students unprepared for workforce
  • National completion rate for college only 39.9

169
Research Based Strategies for Postsecondary
Transition
HSTW
  • Students earn college credit while in high
    school.
  • Enroll unprepared students in transition
    mathematics and English courses.
  • Courses aligned to college and career readiness
    standards
  • Ensure that students who do not plan to go on to
    further study are in a CT program.
  • Develop extra help for students having trouble
    graduating.

170
Additional Actions for Making the Senior Year
Count
HSTW
  • Have community college administer placement exam
    during 11th grade
  • ACT Test for everyone in 11th grade
  • Reality check prior to the senior year with
    parents, adviser and counselor
  • Enroll seniors in upper-level courses
  • Enroll all seniors in at least three academic
    courses
  • Consider requiring a senior project that includes
    a research paper, a product or service, an oral
    presentation and a power point

171
Emphasis on Transitions
HSTW
  • Teachers report that they meet with teachers from
    feeder middle grades or junior high schools to
    discuss expectations, content knowledge and
    performance standards for students entering their
    high school at least annually.
  • Teachers report that their school effectively
    uses a required parent-student-school conference
    to plan or review the high school program of
    study for every entering ninth-grader.
  • Teachers report that their school effectively
    uses a summer bridge program in reading and
    mathematics to help selected eighth-graders get
    ready for high school.
  • Teachers report that their school effectively
    uses a schedule that allows double periods in
    reading and mathematics for students who need
    extra help.
  • Teachers report that a caring adult is assigned
    to mentor each entering ninth-grader.
  • Students report that they earned or attempted to
    earn college credit in high school by taking
    classes at a local four-year college, Advanced
    Placement courses at their high school, classes
    at a community or technical college, a
    joint-enrollment class at their high school or a
    Web-based course.

172
Activity
HSTW
  • Using your schools data, complete the tables and
    answer the questions on pages 56-60.

173
Review
HSTW
  • What does this type of data tell us about
    guidance opportunities in our schools?
  • How can this data be used to impact student
    achievement?
  • What actions can be taken to increase the
    guidance provid
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