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Unit 1: Good learning and what makes for a good learning objective

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By the end of the session you will see how effective planning leads to effective teaching. understand the centrality of learning to the teaching process – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Unit 1: Good learning and what makes for a good learning objective


1
Unit 1 Good learning and what makes for a good
learning objective
Presenters Name
XX.XX.XX
2
  • By the end of the session you will
  • see how effective planning leads to effective
    teaching
  • understand the centrality of learning to the
    teaching process
  • understand something about the neurological
    process of learning
  • know how to set a detailed and appropriate
    learning objective
  • know how you can use key vocabulary to support
    the learning
  • have identified some non-negotiables of lesson
    planning.

3
  • What Ofsted expects
  • The most important role of teaching is to
    promote learning and to raise pupils
    achievement. Teaching should be understood to
    include teachers planning and implementing of
    learning activities, including the setting of
    appropriate homework as well as marking,
    assessment and feedback. It encompasses
    activities within and outside the classroom, such
    as additional support and intervention.
  • School Inspection Handbook (2013)
  • Discuss
  • What planning are we expected to present
    regularly?
  • What planning would inspectors want to see?

4
Lesson planning the DfE view
  • Lesson planning is one of the issues most
    frequently cited by teachers as creating
    workload. Teachers often produce lengthy
    individual lesson plans, especially when schools
    are preparing for Ofsted inspections, as there is
    a common misconception that Ofsted inspectors
    require detailed written plans for every lesson.
    This can lead some teachers to spend a minimum of
    two hours a week just filling in lesson plan
    templates time that could be better spent
    planning meaningful, motivating teaching.

5
  • The DfE view
  • The government wants to bust this myth by making
    it clear that neither the Department for
    Education nor Ofsted require written lesson plans
    for every lesson. Instead, inspectors may want to
    see where the lesson they observe fits in the
    sequence of teaching.

6
At the heart of the educational process lies the
child
  • Discussion
  • How do you ensure that the child is at the centre
    of your lesson planning and teaching?

7
Where learning happens
Cortex (the thinking brain) holds memory,
experience and learning
Midbrain (primitive brain) processes stimuli,
reacts to threats.
Brain stem (reptilian brain) controls autonomic
function
Cerebellum controls coordination.
8
Left and right brain
Speech production
Frontal lobes emotion
Language understanding
Right hemisphere creativity, music, art big
picture
Meaning
Left hemisphere analysis, detail
9
Putting learning at the centre
10
  • Understanding the Loop

Learning
11
  • If the learning is not clear
  • the focus becomes the activity
  • you can then only assess that the doing is done
  • you cannot clearly assess the quality of the
    learning
  • the risk then is that the teaching centres on how
    to complete the task and not on the learning that
    lies behind it.

12
  • You cannot teach understanding
  • You can teach knowledge.
  • You can teach skills.
  • Understanding happens when the pupil demonstrates
    learned skills or applied knowledge through the
    task.
  • That is why the learning and not the task must be
    at the heart of the lesson.

13
  • Understanding understanding
  • The job of the hippocampus is
  • to replay experiences until
  • they are embedded as
  • learning.

This is the hippocampus
14
A clear, specific learning objective, rooted in
the learning
  • Focus on the learning and not the activity.
  • Strip back the activity until we get to the
    learning.
  • If were clear about the learning then we are
    clear about the assessment.

15
Make notes on and use evidence from across a text
to explain events or ideas
  • Is this a learning objective or a doing
    objective?
  • What does it actually mean?
  • Would the pupils know what they will be learning?
  • What is the learning that will take place in the
    lesson?
  • What is the expected outcome and how will it be
    measured?

16
I can explain events from evidence in the text
  • Is this a learning objective or a doing
    objective?
  • What does it actually mean?
  • Would the pupils know what they will be learning?
  • What is the learning that will take place in the
    lesson?
  • How will success be measured?

17
How will notes help me explain the events in a
text?
  • Is this a learning objective or a doing
    objective?
  • Would the pupils know what they will be learning?
  • What is the learning that will take place in the
    lesson?
  • How has the focus shifted?

18
Questions are good but dont overplay a good idea!
  • We were wondering
  • We are learning to
  • The question of the day is
  • Todays mission

Careful with this one!
19
  • Sharing the learning objective
  • When do you share the learning?
  • Always?
  • Do all pupils have to write it down?
  • Why?
  • How do you refer to it?
  • The WALT?
  • The WILF?
  • The Can I?

20
  • Activity getting to the learning
  • Choose one of these activity-based objectives and
    decide how it can be presented so that the
    learning objective is more precise, accurate and
    focused on the learning rather than the activity
  • Year 4 We are learning to write an autumn poem.
  • Year 8 Use and interpret maps and scale
    drawings in the context of mathematics.

21
  • Key vocabulary teach it and display it
  • Every lesson has its discrete vocabulary.
  • Its not a secret so share it early.
  • Just the key words those that could be new to
    some of the pupils.
  • Keep them on display it helps the spelling and
    the memory.
  • Use them in the summary.

22
  • Activity
  • Plan the key vocabulary to support the lesson(s)
    for which you have just written the learning
    objective.

23
  • Activity The non-negotiables of lesson planning
  • If lesson planning is to be consistent across the
    school then, irrespective of style, there should
    be elements that are non-negotiable.
  • In pairs/threes discuss what these might be.
  • Share them with the group.
  • The next slide shows the seven suggested
    non-negotiables that are covered over the course
    of this training.

24
The Magnificent Seven
  • Clear, specific learning objective, rooted in the
    learning.
  • Key vocabulary teach it, display it.
  • Differentiated learning outcomes.
  • Differentiated activities.
  • Key questions deepen and challenge thinking.
  • Shared success criteria.
  • A detailed lesson summary.

25
  • In the next session
  • What do we mean by differentiation?
  • How do we match the work to the needs of the
    pupils?
  • Why should we differentiate twice for effective
    teaching?
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