THE CHALLENGE OF CULTURE CHANGE: EMBEDDING RESTORATIVE PRACTICES IN SCHOOLS Based on presentation by Margaret Thorsborne Manchester, 2005 and - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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THE CHALLENGE OF CULTURE CHANGE: EMBEDDING RESTORATIVE PRACTICES IN SCHOOLS Based on presentation by Margaret Thorsborne Manchester, 2005 and

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Title: THE CHALLENGE OF CULTURE CHANGE: EMBEDDING RESTORATIVE PRACTICES IN SCHOOLS Based on presentation by Margaret Thorsborne Manchester, 2005 and


1
THE CHALLENGE OF CULTURE CHANGEEMBEDDING
RESTORATIVEPRACTICES IN SCHOOLSBased on
presentation by Margaret ThorsborneManchester,
2005and
paper by Blood and Thorsborne - IIRP website
www.iirp.org (follow links to IIRP conference
papers Building a Global Alliance, Sydney,
2005)
2
  • Organisations with a traditional culture no
    longer produce anywhere close to the results
    required.and these cultures are extremely
    resilient.highly resistant to change
  • Lee, 2004

3
  • Culture is the result of messages that are
    received about what is really valued. People
    align their behaviour to these messages in order
    to fit in. Changing culture requires a systematic
    and planned change to these messages, whose
    sources are behaviour, symbols and systems.
  • Taylor, 2004

4
MESSAGE MANAGEMENT
  • Messages from behaviour
  • The management team and those considered
    important are watched by others
  • Messages from symbols
  • Actions, decisions and situations visible to
    a large number of people - and to which they
    attribute meaning
  • Messages from systems
  • How your organisation rewards, measures,
    manages and communicates what is important
  • Taylor, 2004

5
TRANSFORMATIONAL CHANGE
  • The most significant determinant of your
    organisations culture will be the leadership
    style of managers at all levels
  • Lee, 2004

6
TRANSFORMATIONAL PROCESS
  • .will change mind-sets, target values and
    build a culture which can truly support new
    strategies and organisational aspirations.
  • However it can only be driven by passionate and
    persistent leadership at the top.
  • Therefore, transformational change begins with
    transforming the mind-sets of managers.
  • Lee, 2004

7
STAGES
  1. Gaining Commitment
  2. Developing a Shared Vision
  3. Developing Responsive and Effective Practice
  4. Developing a Whole School Approach
  5. Professional Relationships

8
MAKING A CASE FOR CHANGE
  • Building the case for investing in cultural
    improvement requires a thorough understanding of
    the cost of the current culture
  • Taylor, 2004

9
FIVE FUNDAMENTAL LEADERSHIP PRACTICES
  • Challenging the process
  • Inspiring a shared vision
  • Enabling others to act
  • Modeling the way, and
  • Encouraging the heart
  • Kouzes Posner (1997)

10
BUILDING A CASE FOR CHANGE
  • Identifying the need
  • (the cost of current practice)
  • Qualitative data - wide dissatisfaction with the
    ineffectiveness of current practice -
    conversations in staff rooms and staff meetings,
    student and parent feedback, school reviews,
    union involvement
  • Quantitative data -survey data e.g. bullying,
    student safety and well-being/mental health
    exclusion and suspension rates, detention rates,
    overuse of time-out facilities, student absences,
    staff absences, stress/sick leave, measures of
    student engagement/disengagement, academic
    results, retention figuresneed to unpack data
    for meaning

11
ESTABLISHING BUY-IN
  • Share school data and RJ research with senior and
    middle managers, student support services,
    governing bodies, parent bodies, local government
    and other agencies
  • Engage senior levels in the department (at state,
    regional and district offices) professional
    bodies e.g. principals associations, unions
  • Identify schools which are ready to take up
    organisational change - negotiate an MOU
    regarding obligations, accountabilities, support
    mechanisms
  • Identify dedicated leadership team within the
    school to anchor the change program

12
DEVELOPING A SHARED VISION
  • Key people must be clear about the
    organisational goals - what the organisation
    will look like when they get there - and being
    very clear about what they want to measure and
    how that will happen and why it is important
  • But more than anything, they must understand
    that this will mean, in all likelihood, a change
    in the culture - that is, how we do things
    around here or how we do everything around
    here

13
PREFERRED OUTCOMES
  • Shift towards positive relationship management
  • Balance between prevention, intervention and
    crisis management
  • Improvement in statistics (detention, time-out,
    suspensions, exclusions, absenteeism,)
    increased options for managing behaviour
  • Staff who are struggling with discipline are
    identified early and supported in meaningful ways
  • Quality and nature of the dialogue about kids is
    supportive

14
PREFERRED OUTCOMES (CONTINUED)
  • Case management approach to problem-solving
  • Classroom teachers solve more issues themselves
  • Students are self-regulating and better
    problem-solvers
  • Survey data shows improvements over a variety of
    measures (e.g. safety, wellbeing, school
    connectedness, staff morale and stress levels,
    parent satisfaction)
  • Greater engagement in curriculum, increased
    retention rates

15
TRAINING, MAINTENANCE AND SUPPORT
  • What model of training is to be used (given adult
    learning needs)?
  • Who gets trained and in what order?
  • Costs of training? Funding sources?
  • Managing staff turnover and relief teachers, and
    induction for new students and their families
  • Collegial support and supervision
  • Ongoing CPD and access to latest research
  • Increasing the range of options
  • Networking

16
MONITORING FOR QUALITY STANDARDS
  • The acquisition of new skills requires coaching
    in a climate of encouragement, honest feedback
    and support particularly when we are shifting
    from ingrained traditional approaches.data
    collection, continuous improvement loop and
    professional dialogue

17
MONITORING AND SUPPORTING BEST PRACTICE
  • RP coordinator - staffing implications
  • Integrity of practice amongst senior and middle
    managers
  • Collegial support and resourcing for preparation,
    facilitation and debriefing for high level
    interventions e.g. conferences
  • Supportive approach to supervision of Restorative
    Practice
  • Access to latest research/reading
  • Provision of high quality ongoing PD

18
Hierarchy of Responses (proactive-reactive)
System and School Imperatives
Whole School (Big Picture) Preferred Outcomes
Behaviour Mgt Policy Review Development
Best Practice
Relational/Restorative Philosophy
19
VERTICAL CONSISTENCY
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • POLICY
  • PROCEDURES
  • PRACTICE

20
MANAGING THE TRANSITION
  • Identify core group to lead
  • Keep up the dialogue
  • Take a long term strategic approach (3-5 years)
  • Understand the tensions
  • Work first with interested staff
  • Leave old structures/processes in place in
    parallel
  • Involve as many staff as possible in restorative
    processes
  • Explain decisions, share improvements in data,
    stories
  • Use a restorative approach for staff matters
  • Walk the talk and hold steady in the face of
    criticism
  • Participate in professional forums and networks

21
TIMEFRAME INDICATORS OF CHANGE
12-18 months Changing dialogue. Pockets of practice. Improved statistics. Gaining Commitment. Increased options for managing behaviour.
12-24 months Altered dialogue processes. Alignment of policy procedure. Increased skill development. School community commitment.
22
TIMEFRAME INDICATORS OF CHANGE (Continued)
24- 36 months Embedding of practice at all levels. Altered operating framework. Reviewing policy and procedure. Creative solutions emerge.
4-5 years Best Practice. Behaviour change embedded. Cultural change across school
community.
23
WIDENING THE LENS
  • By thinking more broadly
  • within a whole school approach
  • it becomes possible to see where else
    restorative philosophy can be applied

24
PROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
  • Promote openness, honesty, transparency and
    fairness
  • Use Restorative Approaches for managing staff
    issues
  • Challenge practice behaviour in a supportive
    way
  • Engage whole staff and wider school community
  • Management walking the talk

25
DIFFUSION MODEL OF INNOVATION
34
34
13
16
3
Early Adopters
Early Majority
Late Majority
Innovators
Laggards
Rogers, 95
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