BEHAVIORALBASED SAFETY MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – BEHAVIORALBASED SAFETY MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 13237-YjVlM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

BEHAVIORALBASED SAFETY MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW

Description:

In the practice of behavioral-based safety (BBS), here are four related points: ... Freedom of movement - Saves time. Behavioral Action Plan - Wearing Safety Glasses ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:784
Avg rating:5.0/5.0
Slides: 81
Provided by: windows
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: BEHAVIORALBASED SAFETY MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW


1
BEHAVIORAL-BASEDSAFETY MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW
2
IMPLEMENTATION UPDATE
  • START I was developed in 1991
  • START II was developed in 1994
  • START I II were revised in 1996
  • New segments for Process Safety Environmental
    were developed in 1996
  • In 1999 START I and II were reformatted and
    combined to better reflect new behavioral
    developments
  • New database programs were designed to manage
    data
  • Implementation became more flexible and
    customized
  • Since the split of the company, strategy has been
    to re-energize simplify the process by
    refocusing on observation programs, measurements
    removing behavioral barriers. Additional
    behavioral tools are available, but not mandatory
    (perception survey, incentive programs, etc.

3
WHY DID WE DEVELOP START
  • Safety performance had plateaued
  • Organizational changes
  • Losing emphasis on Management Systems
  • Changing nature of FMC Management style/methods
  • FMC Safety Management System was developed in
    1978
  • We did not have a formal process in place for
  • systematically addressing at-risk behavior

4
WHAT IS START
  • Safety Training and Response Techniques (START)
  • A new way of managing safety in FMC Technologies
  • Building block process
  • Focus on
  • employees as an equal partner
  • CARING and teamwork
  • Behaviors
  • culture - core values
  • management systems
  • Utilizes Applied Behavioral Analysis

5
START PROCESS OBJECTIVES
To strengthen our Global Safety Culture
by
  • Building our Informal Management Systems
  • (values, caring about people, walking our
    talk
  • Superbly executing our Formal Safety Management
    Systems (Program Elements)
  • Focusing on upstream factors and behaviors that
    lead to accident and injuries (prevention)

6
STRATEGY FOR MANAGING HSE
HSE Core Values Policy
Management Systems -
Environmental - Safety
- Industrial Hygiene -
Health - Product Safety
- Due Diligence
- Field Service
Site HSE Policy, Procedures, Programs Actions
Risk Compliance Management Incident-Free Work
Environment
Corporate Site HSE Assurance Audit Process
7
CORE HSE BELIEFS
  • Goal is continuous improvement
  • Risk management (hazard controls, behaviors) and
    pollution prevention are the focus
  • All occupational injuries/illnesses and
    environmental incidents can be prevented
  • Line management is responsible and accountable
    HSE
  • Employees are involved in the HSE programs and
    activities at all levels of the organization
  • Working safely and with regards for the
    environment are conditions of employment
  • HSE management and efficient production are equal

8
SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
  • Statement of policy
  • Management direction and commitment
  • Assignment of location safety coordinator
  • Employee roles and responsibility
  • Hazard Control
  • Safety education and training
  • General safety communications
  • Safety procedures and rules
  • Audits and inspections
  • Incident investigations
  • Emergency planning and medical programs
  • Behavior-based safety technology
  • Development of an annual action plan and
    maintenance of data
  • Safety program evaluation and audit
  • Site security

9
START PROCESS
10
START RESOURCES
  • Corporate
  • Corporate Director EHS
  • Outside Consultants
  • Field Resources
  • Network
  • Plant / Site
  • Champion
  • Steering Committee

11
SITE SAFETY AND INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE ORGANIZATION
12
APPLIED BEHAVIORAL ANALYSIS AND ACTION PLANNING
13
ATTITUDES OR BEHAVIOR? Where should we focus
our attention first?
14
Reasons Sites Focus First on Attitudes
  • Most believe that attitude is important
  • Attitude has the power to change behavior
  • An attitudinal approach appeals to common
    sense
  • Therefore, we are tempted to focus on
    attitudes first

15
DEFINITIONS
Attitude - Deep-seeded feeling or emotion -
Internally focused Behavior - An observable
action - Externally focused
16
Reasons Why Behavioral - Based Safety Management
is Right
  • Behaviors can be measured and therefore
    managed
  • Changing behavior leads to changing attitudes
  • Avoids personality conflicts and fault finding
  • Embraces employee involvement
  • Provides valuable feedback

17
BEHAVIORAL-BASED SAFETY MANAGEMENT
A process that promotes continuous improvement
through the identification,targeting and feedback
about critical safety behaviors well in advance
of first-aid injuries or illnesses.
18
BEHAVIORS AS A LEADING INDICATOR OF PERFORMANCE

Fatal Injuries
Serious Injuries -
Recordables - Lost Workdays
Minor Injuries (First Aid) Near Miss Incidents
BEHAVIORS
Systems and Processes Management Systems,
Accountability, Safe Practices,
Engineering Controls, Audits/Inspections, etc.
Values Beliefs All accidents can be prevented,
HSE Focus in all we do, Safety is a top priority,
everyone is responsible for safety
19
  • In the practice of behavioral-based safety (BBS),
    here are four related points
  • . The goal is behavioral change.
  • . Some behaviors are harder to change than
    others.
  • . Behavioral change often requires system
    change.
  • . To change employee behavior, expect to change
  • management behavior.

20
DEFINITION Enabled Behavior
  • An enabled behavior is one over which an
    employee
  • has control.
  • An enabled behavior is an instance of how we
    do
  • things around here.

21
DEFINITION Difficult Behavior
A difficult behavior is a partially enabled
behavior. It is a behavior that can be
performed, but only at the cost of going out of
ones way because, for instance, the needed tools
or equipment are not located near he work station.
22
DEFINITION Non-enabled Behavior
A non-enabled behavior is one over which an
employee has no control. It is a behavior that
we are supposed to do around here but, in fact,
do not have the equipment or the time or the
permission to perform.
23
  • Upgrading difficult (partially-enabled) behaviors
    into enabled behaviors requires
  • Applied behavior analysis
  • Action planning
  • Performance feedback

24
  • Upgrading non-enabled behaviors into enabled
    (fully-supported) behaviors requires
  • addressing the management and systems issues
    that
  • prevent employees from performing the behavior
  • safely
  • changing employee perception about whether the
  • organization will allow them to perform the
    behavior
  • without serious negative consequences

25
ABCANALYSIS (Antecedent, Behavior,
Consequence)
26
ABC Analysis of Unsafe Behavior
  • A - ANTECEDENT - Event that triggers a
    behavior
  • B - BEHAVIOR - Observable action (measurable)
  • C - CONSEQUENCE - Outcome or result of behavior

27
THE THREE KEYS TO USING"CONSEQUENCES" TO CHANGE
AN UNSAFE BEHAVIOR
  • Timing
  • Consistency
  • Significance

28
Timing
"A consequence must occur soon after a behavior
to be most effective."
29
Consistency
"A consequence that is certain to follow a
behavior is seen as a strong deterrent to
unwanted behavior."
30
Significance
"The significance of a positive response has been
shown to be more powerful in changing behavior
than a negative exchange."
31
SOON - CERTAIN - POSITIVE
32
ABC Analysis Example
ABC ANALYSIS S/L C/U /-
A B
C
- Uncomfortable - Failure to Wear -
Comfortable S C
Safety Glasses - Fog-up - See Better S
C - No Discipline -
Discipline L U - -
Wont be Injured - Maybe
Injury L U - -
Unavailable - Saves Time
S C - Peer Pressure
- Peer Approval S C
33
THE SAFETY DILEMMA
Many safe behaviors are punishing -
Uncomfortable - Restricts motion -
Inconvenient - Unavailable - Difficult Many
unsafe behaviors are rewarding - Faster -
Comfortable - Freedom of movement - Saves
time
34
Behavioral Action Plan - Wearing Safety Glasses
Action Steps Date/Responsibility
3/94 Assembly Dept. Manager Assembly START
Team Member. 5/94 Assembly START Team
1. Provide multiple styles of safety
glasses and arrange for proper fitting.
(Review recommendations with assembly
employees for their input. 2. Choose an
anti-fogging solution for Assembly
Department employees.
35
Action Steps Date/Responsibility
3. Identify and recommend work area
modifications that will impact the fogging
issue. 4. Retrain employees on the need to
wear safety glasses. 5. Evaluate stores and
area supply cabinets to ensure that
there is an adequate supply of safety
glasses.
10/94 - Engineering Department and Assembly
START Team Reps 2/94 - START Team 2/94 - START
Team Reps.
6. Increase safety audits in the Assembly
Department and focus on safety glasses. 7.
Review status report of audits and action
plan with all employees.
Immediately/all trained auditors Monthly/START
Team Representative and Supervisors
36
HIERARCHY OF HEALTH AND SAFETY CONTROLS
1. Elimination or Substitution 2. Engineering
Controls 3. Warnings 4. Training and
Procedures Administrative Controls 5. Personal
Protective Equipment
Most Effective
Least Effective
37
Process Summary
  • 1. Identify the key non-enabled and/or
    difficult (partially enabled) behaviors for which
  • improved performance is wanted to
    making them enabled behaviors through
  • upgrading.
  • 2. Perform Applied Behavioral Analysis on
    the selected key Behaviors - ABCAnalysis
    a. Identify the Antecedents (Triggers) and
    Consequences (Outcomes) that are
  • reinforcing the selected At
    Risk behaviors. B. Identify the
    Antecedents and Consequences that are triggering
    and reinforcing
  • the Safe Behavior to take
    place.
  • 3. Develop an Action Plan using the
    Hierarchy of Hazard Controls to problem-solveand
    create antecedents which reinforce the Safe
    Behaviors to take place, and also Consequences
    which offer a net gain over Negative
    Consequences.
  • Implement, train, and follow-up to create and
    sustain habitual use of the Safe
  • Behavior.

38
THE BEHAVIORAL OBSERVATION MODEL
39
IDENTIFYING AND PRIORITIZING KEY BEHAVIORS
40
FOUR (4) STEP PROCESS FOR IDENTIFYING AND
PRIORITIZING KEY BEHAVIORS
  • Identify behaviors for each plant area or work
  • group.
  • 2. Prioritize behaviors based on frequency
    (pareto analysis), severity and/or risk
    potential.
  • 3. List behaviors into specific categories.
  • 4. Develop written definition for the key
    behaviors.

41
SOURCES FOR IDENTIFYING BEHAVIORS
  • HISTORICAL DATA SOURCES
  • Incident Investigations
  • First-Aid and Near-Miss Reports
  • EMPLOYEE SOURCES
  • Employee Interviews
  • Behavioral Audits/Job Observations
  • JOB-SPECIFIC SOURCES
  • Employee Interviews
  • Job Procedures
  • Non-Routine/New Jobs

42
HOW DO YOU PINPOINT BEHAVIORS WHEN THERE ARE FEW
INCIDENTS?
  • Conduct observations of each work site.
  • Conduct brain storming sessions during safety
  • meetings.
  • Evaluate other sources of incidents - workers
  • compensation, OSHA 300
  • log, etc.
  • Focus on well known high risk behaviors - VDT
  • usage, material handling operations, moving
    heavy objects.

43
PARETO ANALYSIS OF INCIDENT REPORTS
KEY BEHAVIORS OF TOTAL INCIDENTS Eye and Face
Protection 19 Body Placement 14 Hand
Protection 14 Tool Use 12 Line of
Fire 11 Foot Protection 10 Pre-Job
Inspection 7 Confined Space 5 Breaking
into Lines 4 Tool Condition 4
44
EXAMPLES OF BEHAVIORAL CATEGORIES
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Positions of People
  • Tools and Equipment
  • Procedures and Orderliness
  • Line of Fire
  • Material Handling

45
BEHAVIORAL AUDIT FORM
  • Location ________________________
    Date ____________
  • SAFE
    UNSAFE
  • 1.0 - Procedures and Orderliness
  • 1.1 - Breaking into Process
    _____ _____
  • 1.2 - Pre-job Inspection _____ _____
  • 2.0 - Tools and Equipment
  • 2.1 - Condition _____ _____
  • 2.2 - Use _____ _____
  • 3.0 - Personal Protective Equipment
  • 3.1 - Eye and Face _____ _____
  • 3.2 - Hand _____ _____
  • 3.3 - Foot _____ _____
  • 4.0 Positions of People
  • 4.1 - Placement
    _____ _____
  • 4.2 - Line of Fire
    _____ _____

46
DEFINITION OF BEHAVIOR (GLOVES)
Leather gloves shall be worn in the assembly
department at all times when handling parts.
Cloth gloves will not be allowed. Modifications
to gloves such as cutting off the glove fingers
is prohibited. OR Leather gloves should be
worn in the assembly department when there is a
risk of being cut by the parts. Employees may
use cloth gloves for all other instances. Gloves
should not be modified.
47
THE BEHAVIORAL AUDIT PROCESS
(Planning and Scheduling)
48
FOUR (4) STEP PROCESS FOR CONDUCTING BEHAVIORAL
AUDITS
  • Observe and Inspect
  • React
  • Communicate
  • Follow-Up

49
REASONS THAT AUDITS FAIL TO REDUCE INJURIES
1. They focus more on conditions than
behaviors 2. They aren't conducted frequently
enough to change behavior 3. They don't
cover all plant areas or all employees 4. They
aren't thorough enough 5. They focus on the
wrong unsafe behaviors
50
REASONS AUDITS DON'T FOCUSON BEHAVIORS
  • Behaviors occur very rapidly
  • Auditors are unfamiliar with the work/job
    procedures
  • Audits are not scheduled around employee activity
  • Auditors don't know the safety procedures or
    rules
  • Auditors don't know the causes of behaviors and
    resultant incidents that have occurred
  • Auditors don't review the results of previous
    audits
  • Auditors feel uncomfortable approaching employees
  • Auditors don't focus on the key unsafe behaviors
    that lead to injuries

51
FREQUENCY OF AUDITS
  • Train 10 of the workforce as auditors
  • - Mostly front line supervision and
    employees
  • Auditors conduct 2 audits per week
  • - 10-15 minutes per audit
  • All members of management that are not included
    in the 10 should conduct at least 1 audit per
    month

52
SCOPE OF BEHAVIORAL AUDITS
  • Weekly
  • All shifts
  • All work areas
  • Monthly
  • All employees
  • More Frequent for Special Circumstances
  • New processes
  • High injury periods
  • High stress periods
  • New employees

53
BEHAVIORAL AUDIT FORM
  • Location ________________________
    Date ____________
  • SAFE
    UNSAFE
  • 1.0 - Procedures and Orderliness
  • 1.1 - Breaking into Process
    _____ _____
  • 1.2 - Pre-job Inspection _____ _____
  • 2.0 - Tools and Equipment
  • 2.1 - Condition _____ _____
  • 2.2 - Use _____ _____
  • 3.0 - Personal Protective Equipment
  • 3.1 - Eye and Face _____ _____
  • 3.2 - Hand _____ _____
  • 3.3 - Foot _____ _____
  • 4.0 Positions of People
  • 4.1 - Placement
    _____ _____
  • 4.2 - Line of Fire
    _____ _____

54
SUMMARY OF PLANNING AND SCHEDULING AN AUDIT
PROGRAM
  • AUDITS NEED TO
  • Focus more on behaviors then conditions
  • Be conducted frequently enough
  • 10 workforce
  • 2 audits per week
  • 10-15 minutes
  • Cover all plant areas and employees
  • Be thorough and systematic
  • Focus on the right (key) behaviors

55
THE BEHAVIORAL AUDIT PROCESS
(Observation and Inspection Step)
56
FACTORS THAT INFLUENCEOBSERVATION
  • The ability to use our senses (hear, smell, feel,
    see)
  • Background and experience
  • Attitudes and opinions about a person or event
  • Ability to connect all of our senses into
    something meaningful

57
A GOOD OBSERVER RECOGNIZES 3 KEYS
  • Attention
  • Perception
  • Observation
  • Attention - Is the act of heeding or listening
  • Perception - Is the awareness of objects, people,
    things, etc. through our senses
  • Observation - Act of taking note of---act of
    considering a fact or occurrence

58
8 STEPS FOR CONDUCTING THE OBSERVATION AND
INSPECTION STEP OF THE AUDIT PROCESS
  • BEGIN EACH OBSERVATION WITH AN OPEN MIND
  • Set aside your opinion or attitudes about the
    people or activity you are observing
  • INTRODUCE YOURSELF TO THE EMPLOYEE(S) YOU WILL BE
    OBSERVING AND STATE YOUR INTENTIONS

59
  • STAND BACK AND OBSERVE THE WORK AREA WHERE YOU
    CAN CLEARLY SEE THE WORK ACTIVITY AND USE AS MANY
    OF YOUR SENSES AS POSSIBLE
  • Look for evaporative acts
  • If you observe someone about to be injured, stop
    the job immediately
  • Do a head-to-toe check for PPE
  • DON'T BE SATISFIED WITH GENERAL IMPRESSIONS
  • Look at everything that is taking place around
    you
  • Be alert to your impressions and follow-up by
    looking more closely at everything
  • Observe for specific acts or conditions that form
    your impression

60
  • ASK WHY IS THIS HAPPENING AND WHAT IS THE
    POTENTIAL FOR INJURY WHILE CONDUCTING THIS JOB?
  • Visually compare what you are observing with the
    correct way to do the job
  • Discover the underlying causes of unsafe
    behaviors and conditions (these are initial
    antecedents and consequences)
  • COMPARE THE CURRENT WORK BEHAVIORS TO THE LIST OF
    KEY BEHAVIORS LISTED ON YOUR AUDIT FORM
  • IDENTIFY OTHER UNSAFE BEHAVIORS AND CONDITIONS
    THAT ARE PRESENT
  • "CLOSE THE DISTANCE" WITH THE EMPLOYEES YOU ARE
    OBSERVING AND GIVE VERBAL FEEDBACK

61
THE BEHAVIORAL AUDIT PROCESS
  • ("Closing the Distance"
  • - Reaction Step)

62
APPROACHES FORCLOSING THE DISTANCE"(Partial
List)
  • Communicate the positive behaviors first - then
    the unsafe behaviors
  • One-on-one approach - low key
  • Show respect
  • Humorous approach
  • Questioning approach
  • Offer assistance
  • Relate unsafe behavior to a previous injury or
    near-miss
  • Direct approach
  • Do not argue with an employee - if necessary
    involve a 3rd party
  • Don't preach or criticize - stick to the facts
  • Use a caring approach
  • Listen to the employee response
  • One of our former "START I" students defined a
    successful approach as "one where both parties
    could walk away with their dignity intact"

63
6 STEPS FOR "CLOSING THE DISTANCE"
  • Start by reinforcing the positive behavior and
    acknowledging any progress
  • When discussing unsafe behavior, stick to the
    facts and be specific - don't use the word but -
    it's a psychological eraser.
  • Ask questions to determine the antecedents that
    are triggering the unsafe behavior and the
    consequences that are reinforcing it
  • Listen actively to the responses
  • Check your understanding of the situation
  • Close the discussion with an agreement to work
    safely and follow-up on suggestions for
    improvement

64
ESTABLISHING A BASELINEOF SAFE BEHAVIOR
65
SEGMENT OBJECTIVES
  • Record behavioral information on our audit
    inventory forms
  • Establish a baseline of safe behavior - "START"
    Index (Optional)

66
STEPS FOR RECORDING BEHAVIORS
  • All safe and unsafe behaviors relating to a
    specific behavior are counted.
  • If you see an unsafe behavior that is not on the
    key behavior inventory also score it. Record it
    under the category of other observations.

67
STEPS FOR RECORDING BEHAVIORS (con't)
  • The comment section of the audit inventory sheet
    is used to comment on the behaviors that you have
    observed and any feedback from employees. This
    information helps you begin the "ABC" analysis
    and to identify key behaviors that you may have
    overlooked
  • Submit the audit inventory report to your "START
    Champion or Area Team Leader.
  • Don't write the employee's name on the audit
    inventory form.

68
STEPS FOR RECORDING BEHAVIORS (con't)
  • The "START" Index is calculated by
  • "START" Index Safe Observations
  • Total Observations
  • TOTAL Safe Observations Unsafe
    Observations

X 100
69
BASELINE OF SAFE BEHAVIOR
Baseline Total / 6
62
70
THE BEHAVIORAL AUDIT PROCESS
  • Measurement and Feedback
  • (The Communication and
  • Follow-Up Steps)

71
BEHAVIORAL SAFETY MEETING TOPICS(Examples)
  • Review of Audit Data
  • Review of Feedback Graphs and Charts
  • Conduct "ABC" Analysis of Key Behaviors
  • Action Plan Development and Problem-Solving
  • Update of Key Behaviors
  • Status Reports and Follow-Up on Key Action Items
  • Answer Questions and Concerns
  • Give Positive Recognition

72
START Behavior Index
Scheduled Audits
Audits Completed
73
FMC Technologies Behavioral Index
Safe (Behavioral" Index)


100

80

Baseline


60

40
20
(Recordable Incident Rate)


4.0
3.0
Annual Objective

2.0

1.0

0
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
74
HOW TO TROUBLE-SHOOT YOUR"START" INDEX (SI)
  • "START" Index increases and incident rates stay
    the
  • same or increase, or your "START" Index
    begins to
  • decrease
  • 1. EVALUATE YOUR BEHAVIORAL
  • REINFORCEMENT (Consequences)
  • You may be using a consequence (reinforcer) that
    is not reinforcing the behaviors you are wanting
    to affect

75
HOW TO TROUBLE-SHOOT YOUR"START" INDEX (SI)
  • EVALUATE YOUR KEY BEHAVIORS
  • You may have missed a key behavior
  • during your initial identification process
  • There may have been significant changes
  • in the work area that could impact the key
  • behaviors
  • You may not have included new behaviors
  • from recent incident investigation reports

76
HOW TO TROUBLE-SHOOT YOUR"START" INDEX (SI)
  • ANALYZE YOUR AUDIT PROCESS
  • You may not be auditing all employee
  • You may not be auditing all key behaviors
  • You may not be auditing all work areas
  • You may not be auditing all shifts
  • You may not be auditing frequently enough
  • There may be repeated unsafe behaviors listed on
    the comment section of the audit form that should
    be added to your key behavior list
  • Employees may be behaving differently during
    observations
  • Auditors may be scoring the audit sheet, but not
    doing the audits

77
PERCEPTION SURVEY (Culture Assessment)
78
(No Transcript)
79
QUESTIONS COMMENTS ?
80
(No Transcript)
About PowerShow.com