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By reading food labels and handling foods safely, you can avoid many food-related health problems.

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By reading food labels and handling foods safely, you can avoid many food-related health problems. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: By reading food labels and handling foods safely, you can avoid many food-related health problems.


1
By reading food labels and handling foods safely,
you can avoid many food-related health problems.
2
  • food additives
  • foodborne illness
  • pasteurization
  • cross-contamination
  • food allergy
  • food intolerance

3
Nutrition Label Basics
Food labels provide information about the
ingredients and nutritional value of foods.
Food labels provide essential information.
4
Nutrition Label Basics
Among other things, the food label lists
the name of the food product.
the amount of food in the package.
the name and address of the company that makes,
packages, or distributes the product.
the ingredients in the food.
the Nutrition Facts panel, which provides
information about the nutrients found in the
food.
5
Ingredient List
  • The ingredients in a food appear on the label in
    descending order by weight.
  •  
  • Food labels that list several similar
    ingredients, like different types of sweeteners,
    list each one separately.

6
Food Additives
  • Some foods contain food additives.

Food additives
Substances added to a food to produce a desired
effect
7
Food Additives
  • Food additives may be used

to keep a food safe for a longer period of time
to boost its nutrient content
to improve its taste, texture, or appearance
8
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
Calories
Nutrients
Vitamins and Minerals
Footnote
Percent Daily Value
9
Nutritional Claims
  • Federal law gives uniform definitions for the
    following terms that make claims about
    nutritional value.

Contains none, or an insignificant amount, of a
given component.
Free
Can be eaten regularly without exceeding your
daily limits for fat, saturated fat, cholesterol,
sodium, or calories.
Low
Must contain one-third fewer calories, one-half
the fat, or one-half the sodium of the original
version.
Light
10
Nutritional Claims
Reduced
The food contains 25 percent fewer calories, or
25 percent less of a given nutrient, than the
original version.
Provides at least 20 percent of the daily value
for a vitamin, mineral, protein, or fiber.
High
Good Source of
Provides 10 to 19 percent of the daily value for
a vitamin, mineral, protein, or fiber.
Must be low in fat and saturated fat
cholesterol, and sodium and provide at least 10
percent of the daily value for vitamin A, vitamin
C, iron, calcium, protein, or fiber.
Healthy
11
Organic Food Labels
Foods labeled as organic
are produced without the use of certain
agricultural chemicals
cannot contain genetically modified ingredients
cannot be subjected to certain types of radiation
12
Open Dating
  • Many food products have open dates on their
    labels.
  •  
  • These dates help you determine how long the food
    will remain fresh.

13
Open Dating
The last day on which a store should sell a
product.
Sell by dates
The last day on which a products quality can be
guaranteed.
Use by or expiration dates
Freshness dates
The last date on which a product is considered
fresh.
The day on which a food was processed or
packaged.
Pack dates
14
Food Safety
Handling food carefully can help you avoid
foodborne illnesses and other hazards.
Washing your hands is one way to prevent the
spread of pathogens that cause foodborne
illnesses.
15
Food Safety
  • About 76 million Americans become ill as a result
    of foodborne illnesses each year.

Foodborne illness
Food poisoning
16
Food Safety
  • Foods can contain pathogens, or disease-causing
    organisms. Pathogens can also produce poisons
    that cause illness.
  •  
  • Learn what causes foodborne illnesses to protect
    yourself and keep food safe.

17
How Foodborne Illness Occurs
  • Bacteria and viruses cause most cases of
    foodborne illness.
  •  
  • Some pathogens are naturally present in healthy
    animals.

18
How Foodborne Illness Occurs
  • Food can become contaminated if washed with water
    that contains traces of human or animal wastes.
  •  
  • Infected humans who handle food can spread
    pathogens.

19
How Foodborne Illness Occurs
Cramps
Common Symptoms of Foodborne Illness
Diarrhea
Fever
Nausea
Vomiting
20
How Foodborne Illness Occurs
If the following symptoms are present, consult a
doctor
A fever higher than 101.5 degrees F
Prolonged vomiting or diarrhea
Blood in the stool
Signs of dehydration, including a decrease in
urination, dry mouth and throat, and feeling
dizzy when standing
21
Keeping Food Safe to Eat
  • The pasteurization of milk and juices helps
    prevent E. coli infection.

Pasteurization
Treating a substance with heat to kill or slow
the growth of pathogens
22
Keeping Food Safe to Eat
  • The Dietary Guidelines outline four basic steps
    for keeping food safe

1
Clean
2
Separate
3
Cook
4
Chill
23
Keeping Food Safe to Eat
  • Clean

To avoid cross-contamination, keep foods
separate thoroughly wash produce always use
clean utensils, cutting boards, plates, and
platters and wash your hands frequently.
Cross-contamination
The spreading of pathogens from one food to
another
24
Keeping Food Safe to Eat
  • Clean

Washing hands, produce, utensils, and surfaces
carefully is the first step in preventing
foodborne illnesses.
25
Keeping Food Safe to Eat
  • Separate

The foods most likely to carry pathogens are raw
meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs.   To avoid
cross-contamination, separate these from other
foods and always use clean cutting boards,
plates, and platters.
26
Keeping Food Safe to Eat
  • Cook

To determine whether meat, poultry, and egg
dishes are cooked thoroughly, use a food
thermometer to measure the internal temperature
of the food.
27
Keeping Food Safe to Eat
  • Chill

Refrigeration slows the growth of harmful
bacteria.   Refrigerate or freeze meat, poultry,
and other perishable foods as soon as you bring
them home from the store.
28
Keeping Food Safe to Eat
  • Chill

Thaw frozen foods in the refrigerator, in a
microwave, or under cold running water.
  Discard any food that has been sitting out at
room temperature for two hours or longerone hour
when the temperature is above 90 degrees F.
29
Food Sensitivities
  • Food sensitivities, including food allergies and
    food intolerances, can make some foods dangerous
    to eat.

Food allergy
A condition in which the bodys immune system
reacts to substances in some foods
30
Food Sensitivities
Milk
Eggs
Peanuts
The most common allergens are found in these
foods. Food labels must say if a food product
contains any of these ingredients or any protein
derived from them.
Tree Nuts
Soybeans
Wheat
Fish
Shellfish
31
Food Sensitivities
  • The symptoms of food allergies vary from mild to
    life threatening. Mild symptoms include

Gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea,
vomiting, or diarrhea.
Skin irritations, such as rashes, hives, or
itching.
32
Food Sensitivities
  • The most dangerous allergic reaction is
    anaphylaxis, a condition in which the throat
    swells up and the heart has difficulty pumping.
  •  
  • Anaphylaxis can be life threatening and requires
    immediate medical attention.

33
Food Sensitivities
  • A food intolerance is more common than a food
    allergy.

Food intolerance
A negative reaction to food that doesnt involve
the immune system
34
After You Read Reviewing Facts and Vocabulary
  1. What does the term light mean when used on a food
    label?

The food contains one-third fewer calories,
one-half the fat, or one-half the sodium of the
original version.
35
After You Read Reviewing Facts and Vocabulary
  1. What is the difference between a sell by date and
    a use by date?

A sell by date is the last day on which a store
should sell a product. A use by date is the last
day on which a products quality can be
guaranteed.
36
After You Read Reviewing Facts and Vocabulary
  1. What is another term that refers to foodborne
    illness?

Food poisoning
37
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