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The NEW TAKS Secrets for Success

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Review upcoming changes in the accountability system for Texas. Engage in a process for analyzing the Spring 2003 assessment data ... SSI - GAR. TEC 28.0211 ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The NEW TAKS Secrets for Success


1
The NEW TAKS Secrets for Success
  • www.esc13.net/cc/tasa03.html
  • TASA Summer Conference
  • June 22, 2003
  • Dr. Janet Russell, TEA
  • Dr. Eileen Reed, ESC XIII
  • Dr. Ervin Knezek, ESC XIII
  • jcrussel_at_tea.state.tx.us
  • ervin.knezek_at_esc13.txed.net www.tea.state.tx.us
  • eileen.reed_at_esc13.txed.net www.esc13.net/taks

2
…objectives for today
  • Review upcoming changes in the accountability
    system for Texas
  • Engage in a process for analyzing the Spring 2003
    assessment data and using that data to plan for
    instruction
  • Revisit the TEKS for success on TAKS
  • Analyze resources and professional development
    opportunities

3
…some housekeeping
  • Attend to your needs
  • Take care of yourself
  • Return to the group when signaled
  • Limit table talk
  • Have some fun!

4
a look from the outside in….
ACCOUNTABILITY
5
…the big picture
6
this year…
  • TAKS field tests
  • TAKS assessments
  • TAAS
  • SDAA/LDAA
  • RPTE
  • SSI Implementation
  • Alternate

7
…whats still changing?
  • Accountability System
  • New ratings and standards
  • Student Success Initiative
  • Promotion standards
  • Linking TAKS to grade level promotion
  • Assessment System
  • Standards for passing
  • TAKS
  • SDAA, LDAA, RPTE, LEP-Math

8
Accountability System Adequate Yearly Progress
9
Transition
  • Current accountability system
  • Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS)
  • Annual dropout rates
  • New accountability system
  • Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS)
  • Longitudinal completion rates
  • Other measures

10
Developing the New Accountability System
  • TEA Staff Research
  • January 2003 August 2003
  •  January May Pre-TAKS Research
  • August Post TAKS Research
  • Commissioners Accountability Advisory Committee
    Early October 2003
  • Commissioners Preliminary Accountability
    Decisions Late October 2003
  • Analyze State Survey Results
  • Commissioners Final Accountability Decisions for
    2004 and Beyond - Early December 2003

11
Accountability System
  • In 2003, no ratings are planned to be issued
    however all scores will be released to the public
  • Beginning in 2004, ratings will be based on TAKS
    (including the new assessments) and the
    completion rate
  • Districts and campuses will be classified as
    exemplary, recognized, acceptable, and low
    performing

12
2003 State Accountability Plan
The 2003 accountability procedures have been
designed to accomplish multiple objectives,
including
  • Meeting statutory requirements and ensuring
    institutional accountability
  • Providing districts, campuses, education service
    centers (ESCs), and the state with data for
    planning

13
2003 State Accountability Plan
  • Advising districts and campuses that are most in
    need of improvement
  • Transitioning from the current accountability
    system to the new one

14
Campus and District Evaluations
  • Campus and district performance evaluations will
    identify the indicators and student groups that
    do not meet the 2004 accountability standard(s).
  • Districts will receive an overall designation
  • 2003 Performance Meets 2004 Standard(s), or
  • 2003 Performance Does Not Meet 2004 Standard(s)

15
Campus and District Evaluations
  • Site visits will occur during the 2003-04 school
    year for districts with accountability ratings
    of
  • - Academically Unacceptable
  • - Does Not Meet 2004 Standards
  • Campuses will not receive the designations
  • - 2003 Performance Meets/Does Not Meet 2004
    Standard(s).

16
New Complexity
  • More state accountability requirements
  • New federal accountability requirements
  • Unanswered questions re implementation of NCLB
  • Effects of the legislative session, which could
    create more changes/requirements

17
More Measures in Base Indicators!
  • TAAS 15 measures
  • 3 assessment subjects for 5 student groups
  • TAKS 30 measures
  • 6 assessment subjects for 5 student groups
  • Dropout/completion rate
  • 5 student groups
  • SDAA results

18
Texas Accountability Changes for the Future,
2003 and Beyond
  • New Statutory Requirements
  • TAKS results, including additional subjects and
    grades
  • Results of SDAA
  • Use of completion rates either in conjunction
    with, or in lieu of, annual dropout rates
  • Incorporation of a new improvement measure
  • Results of Student Success Initiative and
  • Progress of prior year failers

19
Features of the Accountability System Expected to
Be Retained
  • Multiple rating categories
  • Performance of student groups
  • Ratings based on multiple indicators
  • Student mobility adjustment
  • Small numbers rules for smaller campuses
  • Reports and other recognitions based on
    performance results

20
Longitudinal Completion Rate
  • Built on same data as the dropout indicator
  • Better answers the question being asked by the
    general public How many students drop out before
    graduating?
  • Provides more data through categories
  • Graduated
  • Received GED
  • Continued High School
  • Dropped Out

21
Comparison of Annual Dropout Rate and
Longitudinal Completion Rate
2001 Annual Dropout Rates (Gr. 7-12)
Class of 2001 Longitudinal Completion Rate (4-yr)
22
Annual Dropout Rate vs. Longitudinal Completion
Rate
23
Leaver Data System Safeguards
  • Improved data reporting requirements and edit
    software
  • New desk-audit procedure and annual independent
    audit
  • Accountability consequences
  • Increase in level of felony for changing student
    records
  • 3rd degree felony for record-tampering
  • 2nd degree felony for record-tampering with
    intent to harm or defraud

24
Our Challenge
  • To make the transition to an equally successful
    system that incorporates new state goals and
    state and federal requirements.
  • Student identifying information is criticalwe
    must have accurate student identification
    information to link student data across years.

25
New Federal Requirements
  • Assessment and accountability provisions in the
    No Child Left Behind legislation
  • Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
  • Additional student groups
  • Minimum size criteria
  • Mobility adjustment
  • 95 testing requirement (5 limit on absences)
  • 1 ARD exemptions limitations

26
What is No Child Left Behind?
  • The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is a sweeping
    education reform plan, affecting both elementary
    and secondary schools.
  • It asks schools to describe their success in
    terms of what each student accomplishes.
  • Sets goal for 100 of all students to pass
    rigorous State assessments by 2013-14.

27
What Is NCLB Designed to Achieve?
  • Stronger accountability
  • Increased flexibility and local control of
    federal funds
  • Emphasis on teaching methods that have been
    proven to work
  • Expanded options for parents

28
When Did the Act Become Law?
  • The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) was signed
    into law on January 8, 2002, and became effective
    in Fall 2002. Some provisions became effective
    January, 2002.

29
NCLB Accountability
  • Stronger academic standards
  • Tests aligned with rigorous State standards
  • Adequate yearly progress
  • Results reported according to student groups

30
NCLB Accountability
  • School report cards which detail student
    performance
  • Consequences for schools that fail to make
    progress
  • Within twelve years, all students performing at a
    proficient level under their states standards

31
Under the accountability provisions of No Child
Left Behind, all campuses and school districts
and the state are evaluated for Adequate Yearly
Progress (AYP). If a campus, district, or state
that is receiving Title I, Part A funds fails to
make AYP for two consecutive years, that campus
or district or state enters school improvement
status and is subject to certain school
improvement activities, supplemental education
services requirements, and/or corrective action.
32
What Are the Criteria for Meeting AYP?
  • To meet AYP, for all districts and campuses, all
    students, and each student group (African
    American, Hispanic, white, economically
    disadvantaged, special education, and limited
    English Proficient) meeting minimum size criteria
    must meet

33
  • The performance standard for percent proficient
    (AYP target) or performance gains criteria
    separately for reading/language arts and
    mathematics, and
  • The standard for participation in the assessment
    program separately for reading/language arts and
    mathematics.

34
Additional Indicator
  • Graduation rate or attendance rate at the all
    students level only
  • High school graduation standard
  • 70
  • Attendance rate standard
  • 90

35
AYP Targets for Reading / English Language Arts
and Mathematics
36
AYP Performance Gains
  • For all students and each student group that
    fails to meet percent proficient, AYP is met if
  • 10 decrease from prior year in of students
    failing to perform at the proficient level, and
  • Improvement on the other measure
    (graduation/attendance)

37
AYP Participation
  • In addition to the performance requirement, all
    students and each student group must meet a 95
    participation requirement
  • Grades 3-8 and 10 summed across grade levels by
    subject for reading/language arts and mathematics

38
AYP Participation
39
What Results Are Evaluated for AYP?
  • TAKS- English and Spanish

40
Minimum Size Criteria
50/10/200 50 or more students in the group, and
the group must comprise at least 10 of all
students or 200 or more students in the student
group, even if the group represents less than 10
of all students.
41
Comparison of Selected Assessment and
Accountability Provisions Texas and NCLB
42
Required Data Elements for State Report Card
  • Aggregated and disaggregated student performance
    data
  • Comparison to State performance
  • Percent of students not tested
  • Recent two-year trend in student achievement data

43
Required Data Elements for State Report Card
  • Graduation rates for secondary school students
    disaggregated by student group
  • Information on attendance indicator disaggregated
    by student group
  • Information on performance of LEAs re AYP and
    names of schools identified for school
    improvement under section 1116

44
Required Data Elements for State Report Card
  • Professional qualifications of teachers in the
    State
  • of teachers with emergency or provisional
    certification
  • of classes in the State, not taught by highly
    qualified teachers
  • Aggregate and disaggregated by high-poverty
    compared to low-poverty schools

45
For More Information
  • TEA 2003 Accountability website
  • http//www.tea.state.tx.us/perfreport
  • The No Child Left Behind website
  • www.nochildleftbehind.gov

46
…assessment system
  • TAKS
  • SDAA
  • LDAA
  • RPTE

SSI - GAR
47
TEC 28.0211
  • Students in Grades 3 (reading), 5 and 8 (reading
    and mathematics) must demonstrate proficiency in
    the subjects required in order to advance to the
    next grade.
  • Grade 3 in 03
  • Grade 5 in 05
  • Grade 8 in 08

48
…SSI an overview
gt16,000 students have NOT met standard after 2
administrations
MUST meet standard on BOTH reading and math!
49
SSI thinking ahead…
  • Curriculum taught by March
  • Grade five must meet the standard on BOTH reading
    and mathematics
  • Higher standards for grade 3 next year
  • Panel recommendation for grades 5 and 8
  • 16,429 third graders didnt pass reading after
    two attempts

50
Data Overview 2003 Spring TAKS Data How did we
do?
51
Goals
  • Analyze data to determine current performance
    demonstrated by our students
  • What do we know?
  • Use the analysis to think about making needed
    changes so all students meet the higher standards
  • What do we do with what we know?

52
Elementary Level
  • 3rd Grade Reading and Math
  • 4th Grade Writing
  • 5th Grade Reading and Math
  • 5th Grade Science
  • 5th Grade All Tests

Remember the Student Success Initiative at Grades
3 and 5
53
…phase in
54
Standard Error of Measurement
The simplest, most non-technical way to think of
the standard error of measurement is the
following If a single student were to take the
same test repeatedly (with no new learning taking
place between testings and no memory of question
effects), the standard deviation of his/her
repeated test scores is denoted as the standard
error of measurement. What is the difference
between the "standard deviation of scores on a
test" and the "standard error of measurement on a
test"? When one refers to the standard deviation
of scores on a test, usually he/she is referring
to the standard deviation of the test scores
obtained by a group of students on a single test.
It is a measure of the "spread" of scores between
students. When one refers to the standard error
of measurement on a test, he/she is referring to
the standard deviation of test scores that would
have been obtained from a single student had that
student been tested multiple times. It is a
measure of the "spread" of scores within a
student had the student been tested repeatedly.
55
Spring 2003 TAKS 3rd Grade Reading - MARCH State
Level Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
02-03 03-04 AYP Target 46.8 04-05 thru
05-06 53.5
56
Spring 2003 TAKS 4th Grade Writing State Level
Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
57
Spring 2003 TAKS 5th Grade Reading State Level
Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
SSI at Panel In 2005
02-03 03-04 AYP Target 46.8 04-05 thru
05-06 53.5
58
Spring 2003 TAKS 3rd Grade Mathematics State
Level Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
02-03 03-04 AYP Target 33.4 04-05 thru
05-06 41.7
59
Spring 2003 TAKS 5th Grade Mathematics State
Level Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
SSI at Panel in 2005
02-03 03-04 AYP Target 33.4 04-05 thru
05-06 41.7
60
Spring 2003 TAKS 5th Grade Science State Level
Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
Included in AYP 2007-08
61
Spring 2003 TAKS 5th Grade All Tests State Level
Met Standard Results at 2 SEM Below Panel
  • Reading
  • Mathematics
  • Science

62
Secondary Level
  • 7th Grade
  • Writing
  • 8th Grade
  • Reading, Math, Social Studies, All tests taken
  • 9th Grade
  • Reading, Math, All tests taken
  • 10th Grade
  • English Language Arts, Math, Science, Social
    Studies, All tests taken
  • 11th Grade
  • All tests taken

63
Spring 2003 TAKS 7th Grade Writing State Level
Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
64
Spring 2003 TAKS 8th Grade Reading State Level
Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
SSI in 2008
02-03 03-04 AYP Target 46.8 04-05 thru
05-06 53.5
65
Spring 2003 TAKS 8th Grade Mathematics State
Level Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
SSI in 2008
02-03 03-04 AYP Target 33.4 04-05
06-07 41.7
66
Spring 2003 TAKS 8th Grade Social Studies State
Level Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
67
Spring 2003 TAKS 8th Grade All Tests Taken State
Level Met Standard Results at 2 SEM Below Panel
  • Reading
  • Mathematics
  • Social Studies

68
Spring 2003 TAKS 9th Grade Reading State Level
Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
Will Graduate At 1 SEM
69
Spring 2003 TAKS 9th Grade Mathematics State
Level Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
Scheduled to Graduate at 1 SEM
70
Spring 2003 TAKS 9th Grade All Tests Taken State
Level Met Standard Results at 2 SEM Below Panel
Will Graduate At 1 SEM
  • Reading
  • Mathematics

71
Spring 2003 TAKS 10th Grade English Language
Arts State Level Met Standard Results with
Phase-In Data
Graduating at 2 SEM
02-03 03-04 AYP Target 46.8 04-05 thru
05-06 53.5
72
Spring 2003 TAKS 10th Grade Mathematics State
Level Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
Scheduled to Graduate at 2 SEM
02-03 03-04 AYP Target 33.4 04-05 thru
05-06 41.7
73
Spring 2003 TAKS 10th Grade Science State Level
Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
Will graduate At 2 SEM
Included in AYP 2007-08
74
Spring 2003 TAKS 10th Grade Social Studies State
Level Met Standard Results with Phase-In Data
Will Graduate At 2 SEM
75
Spring 2003 TAKS 10th Grade All Tests Taken State
Level Met Standard Results at 2 SEM Below Panel
Will Graduate At 2 SEM
  • English/LA
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Social Studies

76
Spring 2003 TAKS 11th Grade All Tests Taken State
Level Met Standard Results at 2 SEM Below Panel
Graduating Under TAAS
  • English/LA
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Social Studies

77
Data provides valuable information at multiple
levels.
78
  • TAKS performance data are useful in helping
    schools evaluate the academic achievement and
    progress of individual students.
  • TAKS performance data are useful in evaluating
    the effectiveness of instructional programs at
    the classroom, school, district, and state
    levels.
  • ULTIMATE GOAL To improve student learning and
    instructional programs

79
Desired Alignment
Taught Curriculum
Written Curriculum TEKS
Assessed Curriculum TAKS
80
  • The Best Way To Prepare Students
  • For TAKS
  • TEACH the TEKS

81
Changes in Reporting TAKS Data
  • There are three categories for performance on
    TAKS commended, met standard, and did not meet
    standard. Standards are being phased in over a 3
    year period.
  • There is no TLI.
  • There is no objective mastery.

82
Summary Data By Objective Has Changed
  • Objective information is limited to total number
    of items tested, average number of items correct,
    and percentage of average items correct.

83
Summary Information By Objective Has Changed
84
Changes in Reporting TAKS Data
  • Demographic groups now being reported per NCLB
  • African-American
  • Hispanic
  • White
  • Economically Disadvantaged
  • Limited English Proficient (LEP)
  • Special Education

85
TAKS Phase-In for Met Standard Grade 11 Exit
Level
First class that must meet exit level
requirements for graduation
86
TAKS Phase-In for Met Standard Grade 11 Exit Level
  • The delayed phase-in schedule for grade 11 is
    based on the following
  • The grade 10 tests have been built to be
    predictors of performance on the grade 11 tests.
    Therefore, the standards in place when students
    take the grade 10 TAKS must be extended to grade
    11 so that for both years those students are
    required to meet the same passing standard. For
    example, eleventh graders who take the exit level
    test in spring 2004 will be subject to the 2 SEMs
    below the panels recommendations to meet the
    standard. This is the same standard that was in
    effect when these students were tenth graders.
  • The standard in place for each class when they
    begin grade 10 is the standard that will be
    maintained throughout those students high school
    careers. For example, seniors in 2005 who must
    take one or more exit level retests will be
    subject to the TAKS passing standard that was in
    place at the time they started grade 10 in 2003.

87
The Test!
  • How hard was it?

88
…a look ahead
  • Review the content, context, and cognitive level
    of the assessment… TAKS show and tell
  • Revisit the TEKS for success on TAKS

89
  • Content what is assessed
  • Context how it is assessed
  • Complexity level of difficulty at which it is
    assessed

90
…Blooms Taxonomy
  • Evaluation
  • Synthesis
  • Analysis
  • Application
  • Comprehension
  • Knowledge

91
…and Erickson, too
92
a look from the outside in….
ACCOUNTABILITY
93
…the big picture
94
…TAKS objectives
  • Umbrella statements that serve as headings under
    which student expectations from the TEKS can be
    meaningfully grouped
  • Broad statements useful in reporting to parents
    and others
  • NOT translations or rewordings of the TEKS
  • Generally the same for Grades 3-8 and 9-11

95
…reading the TEKS
  • Objective 1
  • The student will demonstrate an understanding of
    numbers, operations, and quantitative reasoning.
  • (4.2) Number, operation, and quantitative
    reasoning. The student describes and compares
    fractional parts of whole objects or sets of
    objects. The student is expected to
  • (B) model fraction quantities greater
    than one using concrete materials and pictures

96
TEKS Important Vocabulary
  • Such as is followed by
  • Examples, or representative illustrations, that
    teachers may choose to use but are not required
    to use
  • Other examples may be used.
  • Including is followed by
  • Specific examples that must be taught
  • Other examples may also be used.

97
…organizing the TEKS
  • Categorize TEKS within a Lesson Plan
  • Enduring Understandings
  • Important to Know and Do
  • Worth Knowing
  • Integrate with Important Processes and Skills

Worth Knowing
TAKS
Important to Know and Do
Enduring Understandings
Wiggins and McTigue, Understanding by Design,
1999.
98
TEKS
  • Now that I have this information, what should I
    do to prepare students?
  • Teach the TEKS!

99
..the key
THE TEKS
100
Reading
101
..reading
  • Longer passages at all grades
  • More expository text
  • Paired selections except at grade three
  • Narrative, expository, mixed passages
  • New objectives/Student Expectations tested
  • True summary
  • Context
  • Dictionary usage
  • Fact and Opinion
  • Graphic organizers

102
…the objectives (gr. 3-8)
  • The student will
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of culturally
    diverse written texts
  • Apply knowledge of literary elements to
    understand culturally diverse written texts
  • Use a variety of strategies to analyze culturally
    diverse written texts
  • 4. Apply critical-thinking skills to analyze
    culturally diverse written texts

103
Grades 10 11 ELA (reading section) Grade 9
Reading
  • Objective 1
  • Basic understanding of the text
  • Objective 2
  • Knowledge of literary elements and techniques
    as used in texts
  • Objective 3
  • Critical analysis and evaluation of texts and
    visual representations

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Writing
110
…the writing TEKS
  • Were organized to ensure that at each grade level
    students acquire the writing skills they will
    need for success in the next grade.
  • Even though only some writing TEKS will be
    tested, ALL TEKS must be taught to ensure that
    students receive a solid program of writing
    instruction.

111
…back to Blooms Taxonomy
Evaluation Synthesis Analysis Application Comprehe
nsion Knowledge
Where do most of the student expectations fall in
Blooms Taxonomy?
112
…TAKS writing
In order for students to be successful writers,
writing must occur at every grade level, not
merely at the tested grades. -Introduction to
TAKS
113
Unless writing is rooted in conviction, the
practice endures like an unwanted guest. --Les
Parsons Response Journals
revisited
114
…guidelines for writing
  • Student selects approach
  • Must use standard English prose
  • Four point scale
  • Focused, holistic scoring using a rubric
  • Use of standard English integral part of rubric
  • Expectations appropriate for grade level and
    testing situation

115
Remember this…
  • Struggling readers are struggling writers .
    Students who have difficulty putting their
    thoughts into writing struggle to succeed in
    social studies,science and many areas other than
    language arts.

116
…what does the test look like?
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TAKS revising and editing
  • Whats the difference?

119
In revision you When editing you
  • Substitute
  • Add
  • Delete
  • Reorder words, phrases, sentences, ideas and/or
    sections in your draft.
  • Make your writing ready for publication by
    focusing on conventions and mechanics such as
  • Punctuation and capitalization
  • Spelling
  • Sentence Syntax
  • Paragraph structure

120
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123
  • Are students offered opportunities to go
    through the complete writing process from
    prewriting to publishing?

124
  • Since the written composition results indicate
    a clustering of students at the Score Point 2
    level, what instructional strategies and
    professional development opportunities are
    available to help students move to the higher
    score points?

125
  • Since most students are clustered at the
    score point 1 level (partially sufficient) for
    the short answer responses, does daily
    instruction include opportunities for students to
    use text evidence to support their individual
    ideas about what they read?

126
  • When discussing a reading selection in class, are
    teachers focusing on questions that require
    analytical and critical-thinking skills?

127
  • Do teachers understand the TEKS well enough to
    teach them at the depth and complexity necessary
    to develop good readers and writers?

128
  • Are teachers connecting reading texts as a
    part of their classroom instructional program?

129
Mathematics
130
Mathematics
  • More complex problems
  • Fewer objectives more student expectations
    less predictable test
  • ALGEBRA!
  • Applied measurement
  • Logical reasoning
  • Graphing calculators

131
Mathematics TAKS Objectives Grades 3-8
  • The student will demonstrate an
  • understanding of
  • 1. Numbers, operations, and quantitative
    reasoning
  • 2. Patterns, relationships, and algebraic
    reasoning
  • 3. Geometry and spatial reasoning

132
Mathematics Objectives Grades 3-8, continued
  • The student will demonstrate an
  • understanding of
  • 4. Concepts and uses of measurement
  • 5. Probability and statistics
  • 6. Mathematical processes and tools used in
    problem solving

133
High School Mathematics Objectives
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136
MATH or READING?
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Curriculum Questions Following Data Analyses
  • Does the curricula used in the classroom require
    students to apply the mathematics they are
    learning in problem solving situations?
  • How well does the rigor of the mathematics
    instructional program and materials prepare
    students for the rigor of TAKS?

142
  • Are students proficient in using technology?
  • Are students using mathematical modeling to find
    and communicate solutions?
  • Are teachers asking students questions that
    require them to think, talk, and write to
    communicate the mathematics they are learning?
  • Are diverse student populations performing at
    equivalent levels?

143
Science
144
Science
  • Elementary Test of Gr. 2, 3, 4, 5
  • Including lab equipment
  • Good labs and field experiences
  • IPC and Biology
  • Formula charts
  • Application of concepts

145
Science Objectives Grades 10 and 11
  • The student will demonstrate an
  • understanding of the
  • 1. Nature of science
  • 2. Organization of living systems
  • 3. Interdependence of organisms and their
    environment
  • 4. Structures and properties of matter
  • 5. Motion, forces, and energy

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Social Studies
152
Social Studies
  • Including CONTENT, CONTENT, CONTENT (names and
    dates)
  • Primary sources
  • Applied facts
  • Historical context
  • Exit level
  • Early US history (Gr. 8)
  • TEKS common to World History and World Geography
  • US History Since Reconstruction

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Social Studies Objectives Grades 8, 10, and 11
  • The student will demonstrate an understanding of
  • 1. Issues and events in U.S. History
  • 2. Geographic influences on historical issues
    and events
  • 3. Economic and social influences on
    historical issues and events
  • 4. Political influences on historical issues
    and events
  • 5. The student will use critical-thinking skills
    to analyze social studies information

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Curriculum and Professional Development
Overarching Questions
  • All social studies TEKS for all grades 1-12 are
    to be taught. Are they currently being taught?
  • Some course content and concepts are tested
    across grade levels and courses, especially US
    history. Are they taught at each course/grade
    level?

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Curriculum and Professional Development
Overarching Questions
  • Are social studies skills being taught
    sufficiently at each grade level?
  • Are ALL social studies teachers involved in data
    analysis? Data-driven decision-making?

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What did we see?
  • Most SEs assessed
  • Higher levels of thinking required
  • Complex reading in the content areas
  • INCLUDING… lots of content
  • Items asked in better ways
  • Declining performance 3-11

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Data Analysis
  • What do I do with all this data?
  • A process for improvement!

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Step One Examine the TEKS clustered under each
TAKS objective in light of student performance.
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Step Two For objectives where students did not
perform well, think about how to improve delivery
of instruction so that student learning increases.
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Step Three Ask Probing Questions
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  • Step Four
  • Look at this years scores using next years
    standards

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  • Step Five
  • Look at the student population groups

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Test scores… a new set of numbers
  • Raw score
  • Number of items answered correctly on a subject
    area test.
  • Review the phase in standards.
  • TAKS scale score (4 digits)
  • Statistic that provides a comparison of scores
    with the standard and accommodates for
    differences in the difficulty of the test form
    used for each administration.
  • used to determine whether a student met the
    standard or achieved commended performance, but
    it cannot be used to evaluate student progress
    across grades

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Standards
  • Commended performance (may be in accountability)
  • Met the standard.
  • Did not meet the standard
  • Higher ed equivalency (coming soon)
  • No TLI
  • No objective mastery
  • Phased in standards

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Appropriate Score Uses
  • INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS
  • provide information about academic areas of
    relative strength or weakness.
  • Objective-level data can provide survey
    information to help identify areas in which a
    student may be having difficulty
  • GROUPS OF STUDENTS
  • Test results can be used to evaluate the
    performance of a group over time.

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Item analysis reports
  • Coming in July
  • Used for
  • Error analysis
  • Instructional intervention
  • Curriculum rework

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Data deconstruction!
  • Blow it up!
  • A process to use with teachers!
  • Process v. product
  • Do it with them?
  • Do it for them?

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Process overview
  • Campus student group analysis
  • Areas of strength/concern
  • By student group
  • By objective
  • Three lenses (2 SEM, 1 SEM, PANEL)
  • Gap analysis
  • The curriculum review
  • Content review
  • TEKS to TAKS
  • Item by item review and reflection

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Data analysis
  • Are there performance gaps?
  • How far away from 90 is each group at the panel
    recommendation?
  • Any student group to be concerned about?
  • Why?

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Item Analysis Considerations
  • Patterns in errors
  • Even distribution of incorrect answers
  • A highly chosen incorrect answer
  • Errors made by high performers
  • Reasons for errors
  • Instruction
  • Content (Not taught)
  • Context (Not taught the way it was assessed)
  • Complexity (Not taught at the level of
    complexity)
  • Crossover issues (reading level, technology use,
    etc)

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Reviewing instruction
  • Current units of instruction
  • Instructional plan
  • Instructional intervention

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Data analysis
  • What program issues do we need to consider?
  • Complete the objective analysis
  • What objectives were low?
  • How low were they?
  • Which TEKS were assessed? (released test)
  • Which items did students miss? Why?
  • Intervention analysis
  • Group students by intervention
  • Who succeeded?
  • Class analysis
  • Were any classes struggling as a whole?
  • Is there a need for additional teacher training?

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TEKS
  • Now that I have this information, what should I
    do to prepare students?
  • Teach the TEKS!
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