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Creating a Strategic Roadmap for Nursing Education in Minnesota

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Title: Creating a Strategic Roadmap for Nursing Education in Minnesota


1
Creating a Strategic Roadmap for Nursing
Education in Minnesota
  • Nursing Workforce Data
  • Presented by Mary Rothchild
  • March 1, 2005

2
MN Nursing WorkforceA Current View
  • Nurses With Current License
  • Source MN Board of Nursing

3
MN Nursing WorkforceA Current View
  • Average Age of Nurses with Current License
  • Source MN Board of Nursing

4
MN Nursing WorkforceA Current View
  • Age of RN and LPN licensees
  • Source MN Board of Nursing

5
MN Nursing WorkforceA Current View
  • RNs With Current Licensure by Age Group
  • Source MN Board of Nursing

6
MN Nursing WorkforceA Current View
  • Average Age at Time of LicensureBy Degree Type

7
MN Nursing WorkforceA Current View
  • RNs in Minnesota were three years older than
    those in the rest of the nation (45.3 years
    versus 42.4 years) in 2000.
  • The RN workforce is predominately white,
    non-Hispanic (98 percent).
  • RNs have a median job tenure of ten years and
    average job tenure of 12 years in 2002.
  • Fifteen percent of active RNs planned to leave
    nursing in the next two years (estimated to be
    8,000 RNs).
  • Source MDH, MN Registered Nurse Survey, 2003

8
MN Nursing WorkforceA Current View
  • Educational Attainment of MNs RN Nursing
    Workforce

9
Nursing Education U.S.
  • According to the National Council of State Boards
    of Nursing, the number of first-time, U.S.
    educated nursing school graduates who sat for the
    NCLEX-RN decreased by 20 from 1995-2003. A
    total of 19,820 fewer students sat for the exam
    in 2003 as compared with 1995.
  • 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003
  • Dplm 7,335 6,346 5,240
    3,978 3,161 2,679 2,310 2,424 2,565
  • BSN 31,195 32,278 31,828 30,142
    28,107 26,048 24,832 25,806 26,630
  • Assoc 57,908 55,554 52,396 49,045
    45,255 42,665 41,567 42,310 47,423
  • Total 96,438 94,178 89,464 83,165
    76,523 71,392 68,709 70,540 76,618

10
MN Nursing Education
  • Number of associate degree and baccalaureate
    graduates for last three decades Source MN
    Board of Nursing

11
MN Nursing Education
NURSING GRADUATES REPORTED
Source MN Board of Nursing
12
MN Nursing Education Trends in Enrollment
  • 11 percent growth in the number of AD/RNs
    graduating from Minnesotas nursing programs from
    2002 to 2003.
  • Total number of nursing graduates has increased
    due to increase in admissions in established
    AD/RN programs. Existing programs have expanded
    enrollment in a variety of locations and on new
    schedules, such as twice yearly admission and
    evening/weekend classes.

13
MN Nursing Education Trends in Enrollment
  • 4.75 percent growth in graduation from BSN
    programs between 2002 2003.
  • Additional increase in BSN graduates will be
    evident in 2004 graduate report due to new
    programs.
  • Total AD/RN and BSN ENROLLMENT growth was
    estimated to be 15 percent between 2003 and 2004,
    according to informal survey of nursing
    deans/directors.

14
MN Nursing Education Trends in Mobility
Number of LPNs completing RN programs compared to
PN graduates Source MN Board of Nursing
15
MN Nursing Education Trends in Mobility
Number of RNs completing BSN programs compared to
total AD/RN graduates
16
MN Nursing Education - Student Age
  • Student Age by Program Type
  • MDH Nursing Student Survey 2000

17
MN Nursing Education Nontraditional Students
  • Since 1995, the average age of graduates is
    nearly 31 years (7 years older than a decade ago.
  • Nearly 20 percent of 4-year program graduates are
    also considered nontraditional.
  • The number of part-time students has tripled
    since the 1970s.

Source AACN, May 2003
18
MN Nursing Education Nontraditional Students
  • The multi-generational nature of students and
    faculty often result in disconnects over work,
    authority, relationships, and the nature of
    learning.
  • Faculty are challenged by the broad range of
    student capabilities
  • Students are busier with multiple
    responsibilities for family, work, and financial
    commitments.

Source AACN, May 2003
19
MN Nursing Education Race
  • Race of Students
  • Exception Metro area PN schools have 30-50
    non-white students during any given time.

Source MDH Nursing Student Survey, 2000
20
MN Nursing Education
  • Many students have responsibilities beyond
    school
  • marriage
  • family and children
  • work 86 work
  • money

Top Reasons for Program Choice
MDH Nursing Student Survey 2000
21
MN Nursing Education - Supply
  • The number of graduates from MN nursing programs
    preparing to take the RN exam has been rising
    since 2000 increasing from 1,534 in 2000 to
    1,848 in 2003.
  • 87 percent of this growth occurred in MnSCU
    institutions.
  • Students taking the exam for the first time.
  • Source MN Board of Nursing

22
RN Supply
  • For FY 2003, 2,076 graduates of Minnesota RN
    programs passed the nursing exam and have current
    registration.
  • In addition, 800 RN candidates from other
    jurisdictions passed and 1,110 licensed
    candidates from other jurisdictions were licensed
    in Minnesota by endorsement.
  • Consequently, in FY 2003 there were 3,986 current
    RN licensees with active registration added to
    the supply, compared to 2,413 in 2000.1
  • 1 Minnesota Board of Nursing

23
Vacancy Trend - Minnesota
Source MDEED LMI
24
Nursing Demand
  • There are two sources of demand for new nurses -
    growth and replacement.
  • The DEED Labor Market Information Office produces
    statewide 2002-2012 occupational employment
    projections. The annual average number of RN job
    openings is projected to be 2,660. This figure
    includes openings due to growth (1,582) and due
    to the need to replace RNs who retire or
    permanently leave the occupation (1,078).1
  • There are 33,026 Minnesota RNs with current
    registration between the age of 45 and 60. Based
    on the age of current RNs, an average of 1,965
    RNs will reach 60 years of age each year between
    2005 and 2015.2 This level is somewhat higher
    than the DEED projected replacement and does not
    include other RNs who leave the occupation before
    retirement.
  • 1 Minnesota Department of Employment and
    Economic Development-LMI. Minnesota Occupational
    Employment Projections, 2002-2012.
  • 2 Minnesota Board of Nursing

25
Nursing Supply/Demand
  • Projected Gap While there is a moderate shortage
    of RNs at the present time, research indicates
    that the shortage will grow in severity, if
    current trends prevail.
  • Projections of nursing supply and demand show a
    shortage of RNs in Minnesota in 2015 ranging from
    2,4001 to 9,2002.
  • 1 National Center for Health Workforce Analysis.
    Projected Supply, Demand, and Shortages of
    Registered Nurses 2000-2020. July 2002.
  • 2 National Center for Health Workforce
    Analysis. Whats Behind HRSAs Projected Supply,
    Demand, and Shortages of Registered Nurses,
    DRAFT, June 2004.

26
Nursing Demand
  • In addition to the number of new nurses needed to
    replace those retiring, more RNs will be hired
    due to the healthcare needs of the Baby Boom
    generation.
  • The population of Minnesotans 65 years and older
    is projected to increase by 53 percent between
    2005 and 2020.1 This population has over twice
    as many contacts with physicians than the
    population under 65 years of age.
  • 1 Minnesota Planning, Office of the State
    Demographer, Minnesota Population Projections
    2000-2030, October 2002.

27
Nursing Demand
  • The projected number of additional RNs needed
    ranges from 789 a year2 to 1,5823
  • Even though the above data on growth and
    replacement varies by source, the combined total
    annual demand is roughly the same 2,660 to
    2,775.
  • 2 National Center for Health Workforce
    Analysis. Projected Supply, Demand, and Shortages
    of Registered Nurses 2000-2020. July 2002.
    National Center for Health Workforce Analysis.
    Whats Behind HRSAs Projected Supply, Demand,
    and Shortages of Registered Nurses, DRAFT, June
    2004. Average change in FTE demand 2005 to 2015
    from both models divided by 10.
    (((50,229-42,247)(50,400-42,600)/2)/10789
  • 3 Minnesota Department of Employment and
    Economic Development-LMI Office. Minnesota
    Employment Projections, 2002-2012. Average
    annual openings due to growth 15,821/10 1,582

28
Nursing Demand
29
A Serious Shortage Projected
According to HRSA, todays MN 1,600 nursing
vacancies will more than double to 4,400 by 2010
and will keep rising to an estimated 9,200
vacancies by 2015.
30
Three Key Factors Limiting Expansion of Nursing
Education Programs in Minnesota
  • From a Fall 2001 Summit on Nursing Education
    Capacity, sponsored by MnSCUs Healthcare
    Education Industry Partnership, Colleagues in
    Caring Collaborative, and Minnesota Hospital
    Association
  • 1. Program funding State and national studies
    put cost of upper division RN costs at 21,000
    per year per student MnSCU tuition is less than
    ¼ cost of program (AACN, HEIP)

31
Three Key Factors Limiting Expansion of Nursing
Education Programs in Minnesota
  • 2. Clinical education often taxes the ability of
    both large and small facilities campuses compete
    for limited available sites.
  • 3. Availability of qualified faculty
  • A survey by AACN found that 1/3 of schools
    responding cited faculty shortages as the reason
    for not accepting all qualified students.
  • Nearly all nursing programs in MnSCU have
    experienced problems hiring qualified faculty.
  • The average age of faculty is over 50.
  • National accreditation standards require Masters
    and Doctoral preparation. Highly educated nurses
    command high salaries in practice settings, far
    above campus salaries.

32
Future Trends - Education
  • Nursing schools would have to increase enrollment
    by 40 percent annually just to compensate for
    retiring RNs. (Peter Buerhaus)
  • The number of nurses pursuing masters degrees
    and doctorates has tripled over the past two
    decades. (AACN)
  • By 2015, AACN wants all nurse doing advanced
    practice work to hold a doctorate of nursing
    practice.

33
Future Trends - Education
  • Availability of nursing education through
    for-profits and distance learning (U of Phoenix
    claims largest nursing school with 6,000 students
    enrolled in 10 states and online )
  • Increasing diversity of nursing students and the
    patient population.
  • Whole patient care helping patients manage
    symptoms and chronic conditions for long-term
    care.

34
Creating a Strategic Roadmap for Nursing
Education in Minnesota
  • Mary Rothchild
  • Minnesota State Colleges Universities
  • 651-297-1858
  • Mary.rothchild_at_so.mnscu.edu
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