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A Changing World: Helping Students Prepare for Life in a Scary World that We Know Little About

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Title: A Changing World: Helping Students Prepare for Life in a Scary World that We Know Little About


1
A Changing World Helping Students Prepare
forLife in a Scary World thatWe Know Little
About
  • Chris Droessler
  • College Tech Prep Consultant
  • NC Department of Public Instruction
  • Chris.Droessler_at_dpi.nc.gov

2
QR-Code
  • www.ctpnc.org/presentations

3
SurprisesFuture DemandChanging World
  • www.ctpnc.org/presentations

4
Degree Level MattersPeople with more education
make more money than those with less education
5
Average Starting Salaries for2009 College
Graduates in FL
  • 47,708 Associate in Science (community college)
  • 44,558 Bachelor degree (private college)
  • 39,108 Certificate (community college)
  • 36,552 Bachelor degree (state college)
  • Miami Herald - Jan 1, 2011

6
2006-2016 Projected NC EmploymentEducation
Required
work exp.
Bachelors degree
long OJT
Bachelor work exp.
Masters degree
Doctorate degree
Professional
1,2 year college
mod. OJT
Associate degree
short OJT
NC Employment Security Commission
7
2008 NC High School Graduate Intentions
Other
Employment
Military
Trade and Business Schools
Private Junior Colleges
Public Senior Institutions
Community and Technical Colleges
Private Senior Institutions
NC Public Schools Statistical Profile 2008
8
Postsecondary Intentions vs. Reality
Graduate Intentions
Education Required
OJT
4 year
11.6
20.1
9
4 year
1-2 year
47
1-2 year
OJT
38
59.6
9
On the Job Training Required(2008 NC Starting
Salaries - 2016 High Demand)
33,110 long OJT Elevator Installers and
Repairers 28,920 mod. OJT Refractory Materials
Repairers, Except Brickmasons 27,880 long
OJT Reinforcing Iron and Rebar Workers 27,730 lo
ng OJT Boilermakers 27,180 long OJT Heating,
Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and
Installers 26,930 mod. OJT Sales
Representatives, Services, all other 26,920 mod.
OJT Tank Car, Truck, and Ship Loaders 26,700 lo
ng OJT Millwrights 26,590 long
OJT Electricians 26,280 long OJT Plumbers,
Pipefitters, and Steamfitters 25,840 long
OJT Stonemasons 24,730 long OJT Terrazzo
Workers and Finishers 23,950 long
OJT Plasterers and Stucco Masons 23,720 long
OJT Opticians, Dispensing 23,710 long
OJT Recreational Vehicle Service
Technicians 23,510 mod. OJT Dental
Assistants 23,180 mod. OJT Models 23150 mod.
OJT Mechanical Door Repairers 23040 short
OJT Helpers--Extraction Workers 23000 short
OJT Riggers 22650 long OJT Carpenters 22220 mod.
OJT Paving, Surfacing, and Tamping Equipment
Operators 22060 long OJT Video Equipment
Technicians 21960 mod. OJT Surveying and Mapping
Technicians 21780 short OJT Building Cleaning
Workers, all other 21670 mod. OJT Multiple
Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders,
Metal and Plastic 21610 mod. OJT Sheet Metal
Workers 21600 mod. OJT Advertising Sales
Agents 21560 mod. OJT Pipelayers 21230 mod.
OJT Painters, Construction and Maintenance 21200
mod. OJT Medical Assistants 21130 mod.
OJT Roofers 21100 long OJT Interpreters and
Translators 21060 mod. OJT Insulation Workers,
Mechanical 21040 short OJT Bill and Account
Collectors 20760 short OJT Medical Equipment
Preparers
10
Associate Degree Required(2008 NC Starting
Salaries - 2016 High Demand)
47,920 Radiation Therapists 45,600 Diagnostic
Medical Sonographers 45,280 Dental
Hygienists 42,630 Registered Nurses 38,470 Res
piratory Therapists 35,910 Radiologic
Technologists and Technicians 35,870 Physical
Therapist Assistants 35,810 Cardiovascular
Technologists and Technicians 29,700 Medical
Equipment Repairers 27,410 Forensic Science
Technicians 26,870 Paralegals and Legal
Assistants 26,660 Biological Technicians 25,24
0 Life, Physical, and Social Science Technicians,
all other 25,190 Medical and Clinical
Laboratory Technicians 24,520 Agricultural and
Food Science Technicians 23,280 Occupational
Therapist Assistants 22,190 Social Science
Research Assistants 19,740 Medical Records and
Health Information Technicians 18,340 Veterinary
Technologists and Technicians
11
Bachelor Degree Required(2008 NC Starting
Salaries - 2016 High Demand)
65,690 Physician Assistants 58,180 Computer
Software Engineers, Systems Software 55,220 Cons
truction Managers 55,050 Aerospace
Engineers 53,970 Computer Software Engineers,
Applications 47,340 Financial
Analysts 46,980 Biological Scientists, all
other 46,710 Computer Systems
Analysts 46,380 Life Scientists, all
other 45,650 Occupational Therapists 45,590 En
vironmental Engineers 44,400 Industrial
Engineers 42,900 Database Administrators 42,31
0 Logisticians 40,430 Biomedical
Engineers 40,260 Network and Computer Systems
Administrators 38,690 Technical
Writers 37,890 Network Systems and Data
Communications Analysts 37,010 Personal
Financial Advisors 35,020 Social and Community
Service Managers 34,120 Compensation, Benefits,
and Job Analysis Specialists 33,410 Surveyors 32
,250 Business Operations Specialists, all
other 31,510 Medical and Public Health Social
Workers 31070 Training and Development
Specialists 30700 Multi-Media Artists and
Animators 30100 Special Education Teachers,
Preschool, Kindergarten, and Elementary
School 29860 Child, Family, and School Social
Workers 29480 Elementary School Teachers, Except
Special Education 29260 Special Education
Teachers, Middle School 28170 Kindergarten
Teachers, Except Special Education 27850 Athletic
Trainers 27520 Adult Literacy, Remedial
Education, and GED Teachers and
Instructors 27510 Meeting and Convention
Planners 27310 Directors, Religious Activities
and Education
12
Doctorate/Professional Degree Required(2008 NC
Starting Salaries - 2016 High Demand)
166,400 Surgeons 136,450 Internists,
General 125,320 Anesthesiologists 116,900 Obst
etricians and Gynecologists 113,440 Family and
General Practitioners 109,350 Pediatricians,
General 106,380 Psychiatrists 87,020 Pharmacis
ts 86,250 Podiatrists 60,950 Optometrists 54
,990 Chiropractors 51,790 Computer and
Information Scientists, Research 30,850 -
49,650 Postsecondary Teachers 48,280 Lawyers
48,010 Veterinarians 46,720 Physicians and
Surgeons, all other 45,950 Physicists 45,100 Ph
ysics Teachers, Postsecondary 43,150 Atmospheric,
Earth, Marine, and Space Sciences Teachers,
Postsecondary 43090 Nursing Instructors and
Teachers, Postsecondary 42990 Biological Science
Teachers, Postsecondary 41420 Biochemists and
Biophysicists 41300 Agricultural Sciences
Teachers, Postsecondary 40960 Medical
Scientists, Except Epidemiologists 40900 Geograph
y Teachers, Postsecondary 40730 Chemistry
Teachers, Postsecondary 40250 Economics
Teachers, Postsecondary 39060 Clinical,
Counseling, and School Psychologists 38980 Law
Teachers, Postsecondary 38790 Computer Science
Teachers, Postsecondary 38580 Forestry and
Conservation Science Teachers, Postsecondary 3842
0 Psychology Teachers, Postsecondary 37810 Archit
ecture Teachers, Postsecondary 36930 Philosophy
and Religion Teachers, Postsecondary 36890 Anthro
pology and Archeology Teachers,
Postsecondary 36840 Postsecondary Teachers, all
other 36190 Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement
Teachers, Postsecondary 36120 Social Sciences
Teachers, Postsecondary, all other 36030 Politica
l Science Teachers, Postsecondary 35930 History
Teachers, Postsecondary 35530 Education
Teachers, Postsecondary 35310 Sociology
Teachers, Postsecondary 34280 Communications
Teachers, Postsecondary 31880 Environmental
Science Teachers, Postsecondary 31430 Social
Work Teachers, Postsecondary 30850 Area, Ethnic,
and Cultural Studies Teachers, Postsecondary 3035
0 Clergy
13
57 of bachelors-seeking studentsearn degree in
6 years National Center for Education
Statistics, U.S. Department of Education
(nces.ed.gov)
14
North Carolina6-year Graduation Rate
2008 57.6 average
15
It makes you think?
What happens to our 4-year program dropouts?
25 of all studentsin Community College have a
4-year degree.
Did we send them to the wrong school?
16
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NC Board of Education Mission
  • Every public school student will graduate from
    high school, globally competitive for work and
    postsecondary education and prepared for life in
    the 21st Century.

18
SurprisesFuture DemandChanging World
  • www.ctpnc.org/presentations

19
If we really want to prepare our students for
successful careers, we need to know all we can
about the rapidly changing job market.
C. Droessler
20
Fastest Growing Occup. in NCRequiring
Postsecondary Education(Total Change in
Positions Projected from 2008 - 2018)
  • 22,800 Registered Nurses
  • 6,710 Accountants and Auditors
  • 5,370 Elementary School Teachers, Except Special
    Education
  • 5,160 Postsecondary Teachers
  • 5,020 Preschool Teachers, Except Special
    Education
  • 4,430 Physicians and surgeons
  • 3,790 Network Systems and Data Communications
    Analysts
  • 3,370 Business Operation Specialists, All Other
  • 3,320 Construction Managers
  • 3,290 Computer Software Engineers, Applications
  • 3,160 Clergy
  • 2,840 Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational
    Nurses
  • 2,630 Middle School Teachers, Except Special and
    Vocational Education
  • 2,500 Real Estate Sales Agents
  • 2,480 Paralegals and Legal Assistants
  • 2,350 Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors

Bureau of Labor Statistics
21
Fastest Growing Occup. in NC(Total Change in
Positions Projected from 2008 - 2018)
  • 32,910 Home Health Aides
  • 22,800 Registered Nurses
  • 18,940 Combined Food Preparation and Serving
    Workers, Including Fast Food
  • 15,720 Retail Salespersons
  • 14,230 Customer Service Representatives
  • 8,260 Cashiers
  • 7,750 Waiters and Waitresses
  • 7,150 Personal and Home Care Aides
  • 6,930 Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers
  • 6,710 Accountants and Auditors
  • 6,680 Construction Laborers
  • 6,190 Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer
  • 5,610 First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Retail
    Sales Workers
  • 5,540 Executive Secretaries and Administrative
    Assistants
  • 5,390 Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing
    Clerks
  • 5,370 Elementary School Teachers, Except Special
    Education
  • 5,260 First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Office
    and Administrative Support Workers
  • 5230 Office Clerks, General
  • 5160 Postsecondary Teachers

Bureau of Labor Statistics
22
Fastest Growing Occup. in USA(Total Change in
Positions Projected from 2010 - 2020)
  • 711,900 Registered Nurses
  • 706,800 Retail Salespersons
  • 706,300 Home Health Aides
  • 607,000 Personal Care Aides
  • 497,700 Driver/Sales Workers and Truck Drivers
  • 489,500 Office Clerks, General
  • 437,300 Laborers and Material Movers, Hand
  • 425,400 Fast Food and Counter Workers
  • 398,000 Combined Food Preparation and Serving
    Workers, Including Fast Food
  • 359,000 Building Cleaning Workers
  • 358,400 Elementary and Middle School Teachers
  • 338,400 Customer Service Representatives
  • 330,100 Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers
  • 328,500 Miscellaneous Healthcare Support
    Occupations
  • 319,100 Laborers and Freight, Stock, and
    Material Movers, Hand
  • 314,600 Software Developers and Programmers
  • 305,700 Postsecondary Teachers
  • 302,000 Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants
  • 262,000 Childcare Workers

Bureau of Labor Statistics
23
Fastest Growing Occup. in NC(Percent Change in
Positions Projected from 2008 - 2018)
450 x 79 360
  • 79 Biomedical Engineers
  • 45 Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists
  • 45 Network Systems and Data Communications
    Analysts
  • 44 Personal and Home Care Aides
  • 42 Dental Hygienists
  • 41 Veterinary Technologists and Technicians
  • 41 Physician Assistants
  • 41 Dental Assistants
  • 40 Home Health Aides
  • 38 Survey Researchers
  • 38 Veterinarians
  • 37 Medical Assistants
  • 36 Financial Examiners
  • 34 Medical Equipment Repairers
  • 34 Pharmacy Technicians
  • 33 Surgical Technologists
  • 33 Personal Financial Advisors
  • 32 Industrial-Organizational Psychologists
  • 31 Athletic Trainers

81,790 x 40 32,910
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Fastest Declining Occup. in NC(Total Change in
Positions Projected from 2008 - 2018)
-4210 Sewing Machine Operators -3730 Textile
Winding, Twisting, and Drawing Out Machine
Setters, Operators, and Tenders -3490 Textile
Knitting and Weaving Machine Setters, Operators,
and Tenders -2610 First-Line Supervisors/Managers
of Production and Operating Workers -2140 Inspec
tors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and
Weighers -1690 Machine Feeders and
Offbearers -1630 Shipping, Receiving, and
Traffic Clerks -1610 Textile Bleaching and
Dyeing Machine Operators and Tenders -1550 Labore
rs and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers,
Hand -1490 Computer Programmers -1460 Packers
and Packagers, Hand -1460 Order
Clerks -870 Helpers--Production
Workers -820 Computer Operators -780 Industrial
Production Managers -720 File Clerks -710 Data
Entry Keyers -700 General and Operations
Managers -690 Maids and Housekeeping
Cleaners -690 Postal Service Mail
Carriers -620 Lathe and Turning Machine Tool
Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and
Plastic -590 Electrical and Electronic Equipment
Assemblers -590 Chemical Equipment Operators and
Tenders -560 Upholsterers -550 Cutting,
Punching, and Press Machine Setters, Operators,
and Tenders, Metal and Plastic -550 Paper Goods
Machine Setters, Operators, and
Tenders -530 Extruding and Forming Machine
Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Synthetic and
Glass Fibers -500 Textile Cutting Machine
Setters, Operators, and Tenders -490 Payroll and
Timekeeping Clerks -480 First-Line
Supervisors/Managers of Transportation and
Material-Moving Machine and Vehicle
Operators -470 Cabinetmakers and Bench
Carpenters -470 Weighers, Measurers, Checkers,
and Samplers, Recordkeeping -470 Chemical Plant
and System Operators -460 Switchboard Operators,
Including Answering Service -450 Printing
Machine Operators -440 Extruding and Drawing
Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal
and Plastic -430 Pressers, Textile, Garment, and
Related Materials -400 Grinding, Lapping,
Polishing, and Buffing Machine Tool Setters,
Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
27
Fastest Declining Occup. in USA(Total Change in
Positions Projected from 2010 - 2020)
  • -96,100 Farmers, Ranchers, and Other
    Agricultural Managers
  • -68,900 Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors,
    and Processing Machine Operators
  • -42,100 Sewing Machine Operators
  • -38,100 Postal Service Mail Carriers
  • -33,200 Switchboard Operators, Including
    Answering Service
  • -31,600 Postal Service Clerks
  • -19,100 Cooks, Fast Food
  • -15,900 Data Entry Keyers
  • -13,200 Word Processors and Typists
  • -13,000 Textile Machine Setters, Operators, and
    Tenders
  • -12,400 Electrical, Electronics, and
    Electromechanical Assemblers
  • -12,400 Miscellaneous Plant and System Operators
  • -11,500 Door-to-Door Sales Workers, News and
    Street Vendors, and Related Workers
  • -10,600 Food Service Managers
  • -10,400 Electrical and Electronic Equipment
    Assemblers
  • -8,800 File Clerks
  • -8,100 Prepress Technicians and Workers
  • -7,400 Computer Operators
  • -6,800 Office Machine Operators, Except Computer

Bureau of Labor Statistics
28
  • Begin with the
  • end in mind.

Does education prepare for a career, or the next
level of education?
29
Whos Writing the Curriculum?
  • Educators? (state, county, school)
  • Business Persons?
  • Politicians?

What are we preparing students for?
  • More Education?
  • Entry-level Career?
  • Life?

30
Vs
  • CompTIA
  • ServSafe
  • ProStart
  • CNA
  • ASE
  • NCCER
  • NIMS
  • PrintEd
  • AWS
  • HS Diploma
  • 2-year Certificate
  • Associate Degree
  • Bachelor Degree
  • Master Degree
  • Doctoral Degree
  • Professional Degree

31
Educational Testing Service, 2006
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SurprisesFuture DemandChanging World
  • www.ctpnc.org/presentations

36
Upsetting the Projection Data
  • Recession
  • Natural Disasters
  • Immigration
  • Automation / Technology
  • Job relocation
  • Elections

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North Carolinas Workforce Challenges
  • 4. Dislocated or young workers in economically
    hard-hit micropolitan and rural areas have very
    limited alternatives for employment.
  • 5. Seeking good-paying jobs, more workers must
    increase their skills by accessing and completing
    education beyond high school or by earning
    industry-recognized credentials.
  • 6. The recession slowed baby boomer retirements,
    but the impact is likely to be felt first and
    greatest in micropolitan and rural areas where
    more workers are near-retirement age.

41
North Carolina Must Consider
  • ensuring that students enroll in educational
    programs that teach the right skills
  • linking the curriculum offered and industry
    needs
  • and integrating work-relevant learning into the
    academic experience.
  • guiding students more effectively in their
    career planning
  • good job opportunities go unfilled for lack of
    available workers.

42
The New Economy
  • New manufacturing jobs require workers with more
    advanced levels of training and education.
  • In many of these instances, however, workers
    entering these industries will be asked to
    perform different tasks and possess different
    skills than the workers who are leaving those
    industries.

43
Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)
occupations
  • A common theme among high growth occupations is
    that they increasingly require mastery of STEM
    skills.
  • Jobs that extensively require these skills are
    often considered mission critical meaning
    that companies build their competitive advantage
    on the talents of people in these occupations and
    that companies risk losing customers or market
    share if they do not have this talent readily
    available or if the workers who occupy these
    positions have obsolete skills.

44
Postsecondary Completion
  • Community colleges represent a critical, more
    financially-accessible resource for preparing and
    training the next generation of the workforce,
    both initially through assisting displaced or
    at-risk workers obtain a high school diploma or
    pass the general educational development (GED)
    exam and through lifelong learning.

45
Programs of Study
  • The key concern among many policymakers is
    whether the programs of study offered at the
    states colleges and universities were relevant
    to business.
  • Educational institutions must continue to expand
    the supply of workers with in-demand skills,
    particularly STEM-related skills.
  • Furthermore, continuous change in industry demand
    suggests that the curriculum in postsecondary
    institutions at the universities as well as the
    community colleges should prepare workers to
    learn and adapt in a dynamic economic
    environment, emphasizing STEM.

46
We Must Consider Policies Aimed At
  • Engaging education at all levels more actively in
    the state's future prosperity by ensuring that
    students enroll in educational programs that
    teach the right skills, linking the curriculum
    offered and industry needs, and integrating
    work-relevant learning into the academic
    experience.
  • Ensuring greater employment stability through
    earned post-secondary education or learned
    adaptable skills by guiding students more
    effectively in their career planning and
    addressing the substantial education or training
    gap that must be met for low-skilled jobseekers
    or workers to compete for good-paying jobs.

47
Final Thoughts
  • A high school diploma alone will no longer offer
    even a remote pathway for future success.
  • For most, the pre-requisites to achieve middle
    class status is the new middle jobs
    post-secondary credential often a two-year
    associate degree at minimum sometimes combined
    with an industry credential and/or a four year
    degree.

48
Economic Development TargetsPiedmont Triad
Partnership
  • Aviation Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Plastics
  • Data Centers
  • Healthcare (incl. Biotech)
  • Logistics Distribution
  • Finance Insurance
  • Arts Tourism
  • Food processing
  • Furnishings

49
Economic Development TargetsResearch Triangle
Regional Partnership
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Informatics
  • Agricultural Biotechnology
  • Pervasive Computing
  • Advanced Medical Care
  • Analytical Instrumentation
  • Nanoscale Technologies
  • Clean/Green Technology
  • Defense Technologies
  • Interactive gaming and E-learning
  • Biological Agents / Infectious Diseases

50
Economic Development TargetsNorth Carolinas
Northeast Commission
  • Agricultural Biotechnology
  • Automotive
  • Aviation/Aerospace
  • Marine
  • Renewable Energy
  • Basic Health Services

51
Economic Development TargetsAdvantageWest
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Entrepreneurial Development
  • Green Energy and Products
  • Health Life Sciences
  • Distribution Logistics
  • Digital Media
  • Data Centers
  • Agribusiness
  • Film

52
Economic Development TargetsCharlotte Regional
Partnership
  • Health Life Sciences (Biotech)
  • Defense Security
  • Energy Environment
  • Financial Services Insurance
  • Motorsports

53
Economic Development TargetsNorth Carolinas
Southeast Commission
  • Distribution Logistics
  • Military Contractors
  • Biotechnology
  • Alternative Energy
  • Boat Building
  • Building Products
  • Agribusiness Food Processing
  • Metal Working

54
Economic Development TargetsNorth Carolinas
Eastern Region
  • Marine Trades
  • Defense/Aerospace
  • Value-added Agriculture
  • Life Sciences
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Tourism

55
NC Strategic Industry Clusters
  • Aviation and aerospace
  • Distribution and logistics
  • Food manufacturing
  • Life sciences and biotechnology
  • Energy and the green economy

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xx
60
xx
61
xx
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xx
63
We are currentlypreparing students for jobs that
dont yet exist
64
using technologies that havent yet been
invented
65
in order to solve problems we dont even know
are problems yet.
66
Who predicted these?
  • Cell phones for everyone
  • iPads, Kindles
  • Smart phones
  • iPod - portable music and videos
  • Hand-held GPS
  • Text messaging
  • Blogs, Twitter
  • MySpace, FaceBook
  • Wikipedia, YouTube

67
Old technologies makinga comeback
  • Vegetable powered-Diesel engines
  • Wind power
  • Rain barrels
  • Recycling building materials
  • Biofuel (Moonshine)

68
If we really want to prepare our students for
successful careers, we need to know all we can
about the rapidly changing job market.
C. Droessler
69
Economic Epochs
  • Agricultural economy (school calendar)
  • Industrial economy (bell schedule)
  • Postindustrial economy
  • Service economy
  • Information economy
  • Knowledge economy
  • Digital economy

70
Workplace Professionalism
  • Punctuality, courtesy, and manners are among the
    qualities many employers see as having fallen
    through the cracks between the Baby Boomer
    generation and succeeding ones.

71
http//www.carteretcountyschools.org/techmedia/pix
/21skills.gif
72
Basic Knowledge Skills
  • English Language (spoken)
  • Reading Comprehension (in English)
  • Writing in English (grammar, spelling, etc.)
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Government/Economics
  • Humanities/Arts
  • Foreign Languages
  • History/Geography

73
Applied Skills
  • Critical Thinking, Problem Solving
  • Oral Communications
  • Written Communications
  • Teamwork, Collaboration
  • Diversity
  • Information Technology Application
  • Leadership
  • Creativity, Innovation
  • Lifelong Learning, Self Direction
  • Professionalism, Work Ethic
  • Ethics, Social Responsibility

74
When funds are short we cut
  • Art, Music, Dance, Theater, Computers, Athletics,
    Career and Technical Education
  • These are the programs where students are asked
    to apply the skills they learn in core courses
  • Electives are now essentials !!

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"Content matters, but we need to pare down the
curriculum and leave room for more application,"
said Tony Wagner, an author and co-director of
the Change Leadership Group at the Harvard
Graduate School of Education. "The world doesn't
care what you know. The world cares what you can
do with what you know."
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Whos Writing the Curriculum?
  • Educators?
  • Business Persons?
  • Politicians?

What are we preparing students for?
  • More Education?
  • Entry-Level Career?
  • Life?

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21 Things that will be Obsolete by 2020
  • Desks
  • Language Labs
  • Computers
  • Homework
  • The Role of Standardized Tests in College
    Admissions
  • Differentiated Instruction as a Sign of
    Distinguished Teacher
  • Fear of Wikipedia
  • Paperbacks
  • Attendance Offices
  • Lockers
  • I.T. Departments
  • Centralized Institutions
  • Organization of Educational Services by Grade
  • Education Schools that fail to Integrate
    Technology
  • Paid/Outsourced Professional Development
  • Current Curricular Norms
  • Parent-teacher Conference Night
  • Typical Cafeteria Food
  • Outsourced Graphic Design and Web Design

85
Myth 1
  • All of the manufacturing is moving from NC to
    China.

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NC Board of Education Mission
  • Every public school student will graduate from
    high school, globally competitive for work and
    postsecondary education and prepared for life in
    the 21st Century.

93
What is the Purpose of School?
  • Learning how to sit in rows.
  • Learning how to get up and move en masse at the
    sound of a bell.
  • Learning how to stay in place for 40-minute
    increments.
  • Learning how to override your bodily functions.
  • Learning how to answer the questions that the
    person standing in front of the room already
    knows the answer to.
  • Its a training ground for behavioral management.
  • Its the place where kids go to watch adults work
    really hard!

94
The 10 key skills for the future of work
  • Sense-making
  • Social intelligence
  • Novel and adaptive thinking
  • Cross-cultural competency
  • Computational thinking
  • New-media literacy
  • Transdisciplinarity
  • Design mind-set
  • Cognitive load management
  • Virtual collaboration

95
The Career Planning Process
  • Assessments! Skill and interest inventories.
  • Do your homework! Research all careers.
  • Get out there! Job shadowing, internship, etc.
  • Talk to adults! Find out what they do.
  • Pick a career! An entry-level position.
  • Start a plan! Schooling, certification,
    background checks, or other requirements.
  • Choose elective classes based on career plan.
  • Whats next? What does it take to get to the
    next level?

96
Ten-Year Education/Career Plan
Four-Year High School Plan
Goal is high school graduation
Reviewed by parents, counselor
vs
Where do you want to be at age 25? Goal is
successful entry into the workplace
Reviewed by parents, counselor, and future
employers
97
Our Mission
  • Help our students find the right career
  • High demand occupations in growing industries
  • ROI - Education vs. Salary
  • Jobs with potential for advancement
  • Future-proof occupations
  • Transferable skills
  • Job satisfaction

98
Questionsbefore I conclude?
  • Chris Droessler
  • College Tech Prep Consultant
  • NC Department of Public Instruction
  • Chris.Droessler_at_dpi.nc.gov

99
Our Mission
  • Help our students find the right career
  • High demand occupations in growing industries
  • ROI - Education vs. Salary
  • Jobs with potential for advancement
  • Future-proof occupations
  • Transferable skills
  • Job satisfaction

100
Everybodys Working For The Weekend
(Loverboy) Take This Job And Shove It (Johnny
Paycheck) Rainy Days And Mondays Always Get Me
Down (Carpenters) I Dont Like Mondays (Boomtown
Rats) Dont Talk To Me About Work (Lou Reed ) The
Work Song (Billy Squier) Goin To Work (Martina
McBride ) Off To Work (Chicago) Ive Been Working
On The Railroad (John Denver) I Dont Wanna Work
That Hard (Blaine Larsen) Seven Day Weekend
(Abc) The Weekend Song (Alanis Morissette) Living
For The Weekend (Hard-Fi)
101
Passion and Purpose
  • Thriving in your work, not just surviving.
  • Leaving the world a little better off because you
    cared to make a difference in your work.
  • Helping students discover their passion and then
    helping them turn that passion into an
    educational pathway that will lead to a rewarding
    career.

102
Passion and Purpose
103
Help students discover their passion, then help
them get on a pathway where they can turn that
passion into a career.
CLD
104
Thanks for listening!
  • Chris Droessler
  • College Tech Prep Consultant
  • NC Department of Public Instruction
  • Chris.Droessler_at_dpi.nc.gov

105
Confucius Said . . .
I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I
do and I understand. (Confucius, ?500 BC)
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