Using Assessment Data and Student Work to Improve Curriculum Maps and Student Performance - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Using Assessment Data and Student Work to Improve Curriculum Maps and Student Performance PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 1297f7-NTllZ



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Using Assessment Data and Student Work to Improve Curriculum Maps and Student Performance

Description:

... critical skills that align with the concept, ... A diagram/visual that shows connectedness/alignment of district initiatives. Skills ... Check for Alignment: ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:634
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 181
Provided by: beccaandm
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Using Assessment Data and Student Work to Improve Curriculum Maps and Student Performance


1
  • Using Assessment Data and Student Work to Improve
    Curriculum Maps and Student Performance
  • Teachscape
  • Las Vegas, Nevada
  • April 12, 2006

2
Reflections for action.
  • Assessment data need to be examined on two
    fundamental levels.
  • Response to data needs to be cumulative and
    formal.
  • Curriculum Mapping provides the tool for
    integrating data by effectively using technology.
  • A 21st century data base needs a 21st century
    organization.
  • Student performance can and must be improved.
  • The revision of curriculum in response to
    assessment findings should and is leading to
    modernization of our curriculum.

3
Essential Questions
  • How can curriculum mapping improve student
    performance K-12?
  • How can we revise our curriculum maps using
    assessment data cumulatively?
  • How can mapping be implemented by a school or
    district?

4
Creating a New Collaborative Culture to Support
Curriculum Mapping
  • Trainers must diagnose
  • The existing values and social structure of the
    building and school
  • Social and professional groups within the school
  • Common myths and problems discussed in the school
  • Readiness for mapping
  • Perception of students
  • Perception of parents and larger community
  • The view of colleagues within the building

5
Using the CM Implementation Chart
  • A school culture develops when it sees itself
    making progress.

6
Curriculum Mapping and the Research for Effective
Schools
  • Collaboration
  • Reflection
  • Shared Vision for Professional Growth
  • Student Learning
  • The process of curriculum mapping
    incorporates all these principles and brings
    educators together to learn from their practice
    as they share their insights to create a
    positive, effective learning environment for
    students.

7
Curriculum Mapping Requires a Shift in Our
Thinking About Curriculum
  • Curriculum is no longer an individual choice or
    action individual curriculum maps are made
    public
  • Curriculum is never finished rather it is an
    on-going dynamic process

8
Creating A Plan For Differentiated Staff
Development
  • Goals
  • Essential Questions
  • Content
  • Skills
  • Evidence/Product
  • Timeline

9
1 High Technology High CM
2 Low Technology High CM
HIGH
CM Design
4 Low Technology Low CM
3 High Technology Low CM

LOW
LOW
HIGH
TECHNOLOGY
10
Consider a Range of
P.D. Venues
  • Various Groupings
  • Hands-On Labs
  • Small Workshops
  • Work Sessions
  • On-line Courses
  • Staff Development Days Based On Data
  • Observing Mentors
  • Peer Coaching
  • Video Conferencing

11
The Basics terms, purpose, and software
12
Preparation The Prologue
  • Setting up leadership groups in each building
    to create the conditions for success
  • Structuring conditions that will make a
    difference in your planning and initiating
  • Carrying out effective R D for technology and
    long-term plans

Prologue Establishing a Leadership Cadre in each
building.
13
The TRAINERS work with the building planning
team
  • Diagnose present status on CM Implementation
    Chart
  • Become knowledgeable about, and comfortable with,
    the mapping basics
  • Identify and choose a technology format and
    template
  • Identify most valuable forms of assessment.
  • Draft an Action Plan (Timeline) for introducing
    the mapping process to the faculty.

14
Features for software consideration
  • 1) To what extent do you need to see compiled
    data from many maps2) The nature of the
    reports and summaries for which you are
    looking.3) Search possibilities- consider
    every angle for searching the maps that you
    think will be necessary for your faculty and
    administrators. 4) Alignment features with
    standards5) Lesson plan features6) Ease
    of use7) Possibilities for hyperlinks8)
    Technology support9) Training support
  • 10) Means of linking with student performance
    data11) Upcoming versions and new features
  • 12 Budget implications
  • 13) Current options not for profit in area
  • 14) State Education Department policies

15
In order to motivate and engage staff
  • Best Practice
  • Introduce CM as a tool to solve a specific
    teaching and learning problem at the school.
  • Best Practice
  • Introduce CM as a hub for integrating building
    and district initiatives.

16
The Hub Effect
  • Identify initiatives that would be better served
    through the use of the CM review process, for
    example

17
Establishing Purpose for Curriculum Mapping
  • The Use of the Empty Chair
  • Examining Beginning and Future Mapping Tasks

18
Coaching for a Quality Map
Developed with the assistance of Dr. Ann
Johnson Des Moines, Iowa
19
What is mapping?
  • Calendar based curriculum mapping is a procedure
    for collecting a data base of the operational
    curriculum in a school and/or district.
  • It provides the basis for authentic examination
    of that data base.

20
There are three basic elements on a map
  • CONTENT
  • SKILLS
  • ASSESSMENT

21
The elements will eventually be framed focused
around a set of ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
22
..looking deeper
  • Content- is the subject matter itself key
    concepts facts topics important information.
  • Skills- are the targeted proficiencies technical
    actions and strategies.
  • Assessment- is the demonstration of skill
    development and content understanding.

23
Content The subject matter itself
key concepts supported byfacts
eventspertinent informationfocus resources
24
Content Formats
25
Content-
Identify the unit you are working on and write
down the key concepts, BIG IDEAS that you plan
to teach. This will give you the groundwork for
your essential questions.
26
 
27
Content
Identify the critical pieces or subcategories and
include them under the concept, BIG IDEA, or
unit.
28
 
29
Skills
Identify the skills a student would need to
demonstrate and develop in pursuit of the content.
30
Skills are displayed on the map with precision
  • Precise skills are
  • assessed
  • observed
  • described in specific terms
  • Commence with an action verb
  • Are not written as a
  • general process

31
Skills include
  • Precise skills that can be
  • Accessed/measured
  • Observed
  • Described in specific terms
  • Benchmarks and critical skills that align with
    the concept, BIG IDEA, or unit that are
    included in your local and state curriculum
    documents.

32
Skills can come directly from standards
  • Most state standards and organizational standards
    are written as proficiencies.
  • These standards almost always begin with an
    action verb.
  • The standard is integrated directly into the map.

33
Precision Skills within Disciplines
in Science, Precise Inquiry Skills might be
  • Observe and make notations of an event in the
    natural world or space
  • Collect and display data
  • Cite significant variables
  • Pose explanations
  • Predict future results




34
Skills across disciplines precise
skills might include
  • Edit and revise skills in all disciplines
  • Utilize organizational skills
  • Read for decoding
  • Read for text interaction
  • Speak in a range of forums
  • Research using technology for information access
  • Create a technological production purposes
  • Isolate and improve career habits for personal
    and group work

35
 
36
Assessments are the Major Products and
Performances
  • Assessment is a demonstration of learning
  • Assessment is observable evidence
  • They must be nouns.
  • Tangible products
  • Observable performances

37
Assessments
Identify culminating products, projects, and/or
performances that you would accept as evidence
learning.
38
Types of Assessments include
  • Multiple Choice
  • Constructed Response
  • Performance-Based

39
Three Tiers of Skill and Assessment Work
  • Drill Practice
  • Rehearsal Scrimmage
  • Authentic Performance

40
 
41
Essential Questions
Create essential questions that
  • Embody the concept big idea enduring
    understanding
  • Focus instruction and learning
  • Push students to higher levels of thinking.
  • Help students make connections beyond the content
    being studied.

42
 
43
Check for Alignment
  • Unpack the assessment and identify the skills
    students need to successfully complete the
    product, project, and performance.
  • What skills do students need to be able to
    demonstrate to answer the essential questions?
  • Have you incorporated the integrated skills (i.e.
    reading, writing, research) necessary to
    demonstrate mastery?

44
 
45
Clarify the relationship between the map and
lesson plans.
  • -blueprints and construction plans
  • -levels of mapquest

46
Coaching protocols Giving feedback
  • Work with CM Master Rubric
  • Examine examples
  • Model but do not do the work
  • Begin with the personal I found it helped me
  • Develop sets of behaviors from a group about how
    the group can help one another
  • Paired feedback
  • One unit to start

47
Coaching for Essential Questions
48
Essential questions are designed to meet the
needs of YOUR SPECIFIC student population
  • their stage of development
  • Their age group
  • their learning characteristics
  • their communities
  • their aspirations
  • their needs

49
What are the learning outcomes for my students?
  • Enduring understandings
  • Key concepts
  • Critical facts
  • Precision skill development
  • Products and performances

50
Essential questions should align with our key
curriculum elements
  • CONTENT
  • ASSESSMENT
  • SKILLS

51
Why do we need essential questions?
  • Potpourri problem
  • Lack of focus
  • Long term recall
  • Communication between teachers
  • Communication between student and teacher
  • Clarifying purpose
  • Framing connections between content, skill, and
    assessment choices

52
Essential questions designing mental velcro
  • To set direction
  • To increase text interaction and retention
  • To focus content
  • To meet standards
  • To work within time constraints
  • To avoid coverage

53
Refining the content data
  • Revisiting the content section .
  • Revisiting it whether it is based on a topic,
    theme, issue, problem, or work.
  • REFINING and FOCUSING the content using a set of
    essential questions.

54
Design Essential Questions
  • Structure the unit around 2 to 5 essential
    questions
  • Use questions as the scope and sequence of unit
  • Embrace the appropriate standards
  • Engage the learner
  • Inspire the learner
  • Focus the learner

55
Criteria for Essential Questions
  • Highlights conceptual priorities
  • Fulfills outcomes
  • Language for organizing
  • 2 to 5 questions
  • Distinct section
  • Non-repetitive set
  • Realistic set of time
  • POSTED by all
  • Connects a range of disciplines (if.....)
  • Logical sequence
  • Understood by each child
  • Open for investigation

56
Should use language for organizing
  • Since the questions serve an organizational
    purpose similar to chapter headings in a book,
    they should frame a set of activities and plans.
  • They are organizing a set of learning experiences
    and have the breadth to do so.
  • A highly narrow question answerable as a yes/no
    will not work.

57
Highlights conceptual priorities
  • The essential question should have a clear
    CONCEPT embedded.
  • A concept is a relational statement. This
    statement represents a CLEAR understanding and
    idea. FACTS relate directly to the concept to
    support its meaning.
  • EXAMPLE A countrys geography has a direct
    impact on its economy.

58
Fulfills Learning Outcomes
  • A good essential question supports the key
    learning goals that have been determined for your
    learners.
  • There are many possible questions for a unit of
    study, so we must choose those that are the most
    important (the most essential) for our SPECIFIC
    learners.

59
Two to Five Questions
  • In order to keep the unit manageable for students
    and for teachers, it is recommended to use two to
    five questions.
  • On occasion, one question will suffice.
  • Using too many questions often indicates overlap.

60
Distinct section
  • Each question represents a section of study that
    can stand on its own.
  • There should be an inherent integrity to the
    essential question and the set of
    activities/lesson plans that are within its
    grasp.
  • Think of the analogy to chapter headings in a
    book. Every page in any specific chapter belongs
    there.

61
Non-Repetitive Set
  • Questions should not overlap.
  • It is important that a sequence of questions are
    not repetitious.
  • If they are repetitious, this is a sign that they
    can be combined.

62
Realistic set of time
  • An important consideration is how much time is
    available for a unit of study.
  • With a shorter unit, obviously fewer questions
    are possible to investigate.
  • A longer timeframe does not necessarily mean many
    questions are needed, but it does allow for more.
  • The idea is to match the number of questions with
    the goals of the unit and with the available
    timeframe for instruction.

63
POSTED by all
  • A critical instructional strategy is to POST all
    essential questions prominently.
  • EQs should be highly visible. They should be
    featured on all assignments on the blackboard
    and, on tests.

64
Connects a range of disciplines if the unit is an
interdisciplinary design.
  • Essential questions can be used within any
    discipline. (For example, in a biology unit on
    DNA).
  • If you are designing an interdisciplinary unit,
    it is critical that questions embrace all of your
    designated disciplines naturally.
  • A forced connection is a contradiction in terms,
    and students need to see easily how the subject
    area directly relates to the question.

65
Logical sequence
  • The sequence of the questions is very important
    to the learner.
  • There should be a clear sequence to the sets of
    questions.
  • This does not mean that a teacher has to be rigid
    in referring to the questions, but it does
    suggest that there should be a rationale for the
    sequence.

66
Understood by each child
  • The actual word choice for the questions should
    be thoughtfully considered.
  • The questions are FOR THE STUDENTS.
  • They should written with clear and accessible
    language.

67
Open for investigation
  • One of the most exciting aspects of writing
    essential questions is that they can spark
    investigation.
  • Each question can and should frame targeted
    content that the teachers wishes students to
    investigate. (In teacher developed units.)
  • Each question should also BE OPEN for genuine
    investigation as well.

68
Essential Questions as an Organizer
69
FLIGHT
  • What flies?
  • How and why do things in nature fly?
  • How does flight impact human beings?
  • What is the future of flight?
  • Fourth Grade- six week interdisciplinary unit

70
Everyday Physics Transportation Safety
  • How can cars, boats, and airplanes becomes safer
    for passengers?
  • How can principles of force and motion help
    driver effectiveness and safety?
  • Are safety and speed compatible?
  • 12th grade -Physics course-seminar model 6 week
    cycle

71
COMMUNITIES
  • What is a community?
  • What are the characteristics of a rural,
    suburban, and urban community?
  • Second grade science unit on communities

72
INTELLIGENCE
  • What is intelligence?
  • How has intelligence evolved?
  • How is intelligence measured?
  • Is intelligence solely a human phenomenon?
  • How will intelligence be altered?
  • 11th grade-A.P.. Biology -interdisciplinary-four
    week unit

73
Prejudice and Tolerance
  • What are the different kinds of human prejudice?
  • How can tolerance be taught?
  • What has been the impact of individual and group
    prejudice?
  • How can I become more tolerant?
  • 8th grade-interdisciplinary team-thematic unit- 3
    weeks

74
SNOW
  • What is snow?
  • How does it affect people?
  • How does it affect me?
  • First grade-3 weeks-interdisciplinary unit

75
Multiplication
  • How will I ever learn to multiply?
  • Where will I ever use multiplication?
  • Second and Third Grade (multigrade classroom)-
    three week intensive -discipline based-then
    through year

76
Prejudice and Tolerance
  • What are the different kinds of human prejudice?
  • How can tolerance be taught?
  • What has been the impact of individual and group
    prejudice?
  • How can I become more tolerant?
  • 8th grade-interdisciplinary team-thematic unit- 3
    weeks

77
Linking questions to skills and assessments
78
Coherent design
79
Range of situations for questions
  • Classroom unit design specific units of study
  • Classroom strands ongoing school year sets of
    experiences (i.e. writers workshop)
  • School wide initiatives affective or academic
    for short term or long term study
  • Independent study these are designed by the
    student
  • Over-arching questions
  • Unit questions
  • Professional development we should practice what
    we preach and use questions in our own staff
    development

80
Diagnosing Student Needs from Assessment Data
  • Prescribing a Curricular Response in Our Maps

81
Gap analysisMerging Findings into Maps
  • Bi-Level Analysis We examine student work and
    performance data in terms of
  • The subject matter concepts and skills needing
    attention.
  • The requisite language capacity necessary to
    carry out tasks
  • Linguistic patterns
  • High frequency words
  • Specialized terms
  • Editing/revising strategies

82
Every teacher is a language teacher and should
  • identify precision skills
  • elevate reading, writing, speaking, listening
    in every class
  • assess performance of precision language skills
    in all student work.

83
Practice analyzing
  • Actual test items
  • Assignments
  • Performance Tasks
  • Common points of confusion

84
Skill or Activity?
  • Form a poetry circle
  • Bring in pictures of different types of food
  • Create a salt dough map
  • Put together a puzzle of the continents
  • Visit Pendarvis and Bevans mine and view video
    tapes of other mining areas

85
Analyzing the Skills Poetry Example
  • Skill
  • Use an organizer to plan and write an end rhyme
    poem using good organization and word choice
  • Rewritten to reflect more precise skills
  • Use Venn diagram or web to organize poem ideas
  • Demonstrate organization when writing end rhyme
    poem
  • Apply appropriate word choice
  • Write an end rhyme poem

86
Assessment DataInclude all Assessments
  • Crucial component of the maps
  • Often the least developed,
  • Describes the student feedback that informs our
    instruction
  • Balanced mix of assessing of learning and
    assessing for learning
  • Measures the skills and content
  • Assesses multiple skill levels (Blooms)
  • Represents a variety of assessment strategies
  • What does Chapter 3 test tell us?
  • What are the ways (other than tests) you receive
    feedback from your students that informs their
    grades?

87
Assessment Types
  • Selected Response
  • Multiple choice, matching, true/false, fill-in
    blank,
  • Writing Assessments
  • Constructed response, extended response, short
    answer, essay
  • Personal Communication
  • Question/answer, conferences, and interviews
  • Performance-based
  • Skill demonstrations, products, performances

88
Formative and Summative
  • Assessing FOR Learning
  • Process oriented occurs during learning
  • Provides information for modifying teaching and
    learning activities
  • Assists students to self-assess and learn more
  • Assessing Of Learning
  • Designed primarily for purposes of
    accountability, ranking of students and/or
    certifying competence
  • Is an event after learning
  • Measures how much students have learned at a
    particular point in time

89
7 Strategies for Assessing For Learning
  • Provide a clear vision of learning target to
    learner
  • Use models of strong and weak work
  • Offer regular, descriptive feedback
  • Teach students to self-assess and set goals
  • Design lessons to focus on one aspect of quality
    at a time
  • Teach students focused revision
  • Engage students in self-reflection, keeping track
    of their learning and sharing
  • Circle the assessment strategies that you
    currently implement on a regular basis in your
    classroom that assess for learning.

90
Assessments Must Be Balanced
  • of (summative) learning and for (formative)
    learning
  • multiple, varied assessment to serve all learners
  • Keeping in mind that its not the type that
    determines formative or summative its how the
    results are used.

91
Most Frequently Assessed Tasks on Standardized
Exams That We Must Consider When Creating Our Own
Assessments
  • Using and interpreting graphs
  • Making Inferences
  • Using Map and Globe Skills
  • Defending an Idea
  • Critiquing a Solution
  • Determining Cause and Effect Relationships
  • Writing For Different Audiences and for a Variety
    of Purposes
  • Critically Analyzing Written and Other Visual
    Material
  • Editing for Mechanics and Sentence Structure
  • Evaluating and Extending Meaning
  • Synthesizing Information and Ideas

92
Practice Reviewing Maps
  • Look at the Maps for Critique and practice
    looking for
  • Readability
  • Connection between content, skills and
    assessments
  • Balanced assessments
  • Your questions
  • Use the protocol sheet for your comments

93
What are Data?
  • Information organized for analysis or used as the
    basis for decision-making
  • Primary Data Sources
  • Outcome test scores, attendance reports,
    behavior reports, survey results
  • Demographic gender, socio-economic, race,
    disability status, limited English
  • Process practices that make up the
    instructional program
  • the information on curriculum maps is a vital
    source of process data

94
What Data Do The Curriculum Maps Provide?
  • Current, authentic, time-bound process data that
    help us assess
  • the skills/standards are actually taught and
    assessed?
  • If all elements of the standard/learning target
    taught?
  • The amount of time spent teaching the particular
    skills reflective of this learning target or test
    item?
  • Is there enough time?
  • Too much time?

95
What The Maps Provide continued
  • If classroom assessments relate to the learning
    targets and larger standards
  • if the classroom assessments are appropriate
  • if the learning target action verbs are listed on
    the maps
  • If we know and agree with the definition of the
    action verbs?
  • If the vocabulary used on the exam is included in
    the curriculum?

96
Standards Data Alignment
  • Meaningful standards alignment
  • Meaningful alignment to standards
  • What does cover really mean?
  • What do the standards really ask my students to
    know ?
  • How do I connect the standards to the mapping
    data?
  • Assessment piece is key

97
Assessment is a demonstration of learning
  • The focus should be on feedback
  • Designed to help the learner REVISE his or her
    performance independently.
  • The assessments should be cumulative
    progressions.
  • CAN HE or SHE MAKE THE PERFORMANCE BETTER?

98
Assessment should reflect our times
  • screenplays
  • teleplays
  • broadcasts
  • email
  • grant proposals
  • web page
  • spread sheets
  • CAD blueprints
  • forecasts
  • media criticism

99
Technology as a platform for revising assessment
possibilities
  • Curriculum Mapping real time data and revision
  • Electronic site visits
  • Electronic video conferencing
  • Data banks for assessments

100
Improving Assessment Design
  • Editing the maps for a thoughtful application of
    developmental perspectives on the maps.
  • Generating BENCHMARK assessments based on item
    analysis of a sites specific student population.

101
Assessment is a demonstration of learning
  • The focus should be on feedback
  • Designed to reveal knowledge and insight into the
    essential questions
  • Designed to reveal skill acquisition in the
    examination of those questions

102
DEVELOPMENTAL GENRE
  • MATCHING TYPES OF WORK WITH THE CHARACTERISTIC OF
    THE LEARNER

103
Developmental Stages your learners growth
patterns
  • Cognitive
  • Affective
  • Moral
  • Social role taking
  • Physical

104
K-2
  • Sculptures
  • Models
  • Observation notes
  • Captions
  • Story boards
  • Joke-telling
  • Murals
  • Diorama
  • Graphs
  • Charts
  • Checklists
  • Symbol systems
  • Speech to persuade

105
-----------------------Grades 3-5
  • artifact analysis
  • comparative observation
  • play performance
  • newspaper articles
  • math matrix design
  • extended research
  • reports
  • note cards
  • interview questions
  • short stories
  • photo essaytext

106
Grades 6-8
  • the essay, the essay, the essay....
  • hypothesis testing and telling
  • issue based forums
  • blueprints
  • models
  • museum text/captions
  • four note taking forms
  • organizational templates
  • presentation of findings
  • original playwriting
  • simulations

107
Grades 9-10and 11-12
  • position papers
  • legal briefs
  • business plans
  • anthologies
  • choreography
  • game strategy books
  • film criticism
  • policy statements
  • literary criticism
  • professional journals
  • senior defense project
  • workstudy analysis

108
  • Reaching new ground
  • Guiding a staff to establishing benchmark
    assessments

109
Mapping Benchmark Assessments
  • Benchmarks can be designed on multiple levels
    state tests, district, classroom tasks.
  • A school establishes a common set of skills
    needing development.
  • An internally generated benchmark assessment task
    is developed by teachers with the same protocols
    the same timetable.

110
Continued...
  • The task should merge with the ongoing curriculum
    naturally.
  • Student products can then be evaluated both
    vertically and horizontally.
  • Revisions in the curriculum map should reflect a
    few targeted skills needing help.
  • Revisions should be applied thoughtfully to
    developmental characteristics of the learner.

111
Integrating Cross-Curricular
  • Identify grade level benchmarks
  • Use map to identify where skills are being taught
  • Add appropriate benchmarks that may be missing
  • Align with classroom assessments
  • Use feedback from assessments to modify
    instruction if needed

112
Action Verbs Listed in Learning Target
Appropriate Assessment Method
113
High School Standards ExamplesMaking the
Connections
  • Examples
  • 9th grade LA
  • Synthesize the content from several sources on a
    single issue or written by a single author,
    clarifying ideas and connecting them to other
    sources and related topics
  • 9th Grade Math
  • Analyze information found in maps, charts,
    tables, graphs, diagrams, cutaways and overlays

114
  • 9th grade geography
  • Interpret data to make comparisons between and
    among countries and regions including birth rate,
    death rates, infant mortality rates, education
    levels and per capita Gross Domestic Product
  • 11th grade Life Sciences
  • Relate how birth rates, fertility rates and death
    rates are affected by various environmental
    factors
  • 11th grade Science Inquiry
  • Summarize data and construct a reasonable
    argument based on these data and other known
    information

115
Standards and the Maps
  • What do these standards have in common?
  • Could these standards be connected across the
    curriculum?
  • Could teachers gather together across content
    areas and discuss these connections?
  • Would this save time?
  • Would we better meet the standard?
  • Would it increase student understanding?
  • Could we make our assessments more meaningful?

116
Sample State Exam Questions
  • Social Studies
  • Use the following graph to answer the following
    questions
  • Math
  • The graph below represents the relationship
    between distance and time. During what interval
    was Travis average rate of travel the fastest
  • Science
  • Use the table to answer
  • Language arts
  • Choose one of the following ideas for a graphic
    to accompany this passage.
  • What does this information tell us?

117
Analyzing or drilling down into the curriculum
maps to help find answers.
118
One Districts Story
  • Outcomes from the initial cycle of mapping in
    K-12 language arts
  • Writing
  • Unclear from the maps how writing is assessed at
    all grade levels (consistency is needed)
  • Is a common writing rubric needed?
  • What pre-writing, organizational tools are used
    at each level it is inconsistent (outlining,
    4-square, other graphic organizers, etc.)
  • What types of writing are required at each grade
    level?
  • Consistent terminology regarding topic sentence
    and thesis statement
  • How are transition words taught? What are they
    at each level?
  • Parts of Speech
  • What parts of speech should be taught at each
    grade level? There is a focus on nouns and
    verbs what about the other parts of speech?
  • Vocabulary
  • Should we have a vocabulary strand on the maps
    that would include high-frequency words and
    content-specific vocabulary?
  • Phonics
  • What is the definition of phonics, phonemic
    awareness and decoding?
  • Reading
  • Predominance of fiction

119
Outcomes From State Language Arts Exam Analysis
Grades 4,8,10
  • Scored near state average in most areas but there
    were areas in need of attention
  • Editing skills sentence structure, grammar,
    spelling, verb tense
  • Exam Vocabulary challenging language that most
    students probably do not know
  • Ability to summarize, draw conclusions, make
    predictions,
  • most likely, mostly about, least likely, mainly
    about,
  • Nonfiction texts many of the reading excerpts
    were nonfiction
  • Using transition words before, after, although,
    however

120
Comparing the Results
  • How did both processes work together?
  • What themes can you identify across both data
    sources?
  • How would this information improve student
    achievement?
  • How would this information inform teaching and
    learning?

121
The Outcomes K-12 Language Arts
  • Made changes on the maps as the data was
    analyzed, compared and decisions were made
  • Shared writing assessments
  • Analyzed what and how writing organizational
    tools were used (4-square writing)
  • Modified sequence of skills (especially parts of
    speech)
  • Made decisions regarding what can and should go
    and what must be taught in more depth
  • The discussion was student-focused

122
Administrator Support is Crucial!!
  • Administrators must
  • have a good understanding of the process
  • celebrate and recognize the value of the process
    with teachers and communicate this at every
    opportunity
  • communicate the process to School Board and
    parents
  • be flexible and forgiving in order to learn what
    is taught and not taught
  • assure teachers during the mapping process maps
    are not used for evaluation

123
Every teacher is a language teacher and should
  • identify precision skills
  • elevate reading, writing, speaking, listening
    in every class
  • assess performance of precision language skills
    in all student work.

124
ANCIENT EGYPT Land of the Pharaohs
  • Why Egypt?
  • What were major contributions of the Ancient
    Egyptians?
  • What is their legacy?
  • Sixth grade- 7 week humanities unit-middle school
    interdisciplinary team unit

125
The Element of Assessment
  • Assessment is a demonstration of learning
  • Assessment is evidence of the learners growing
    insight and skill

126
Products
  • are tangible objects
  • examples charts stories, poems, models,
    pictures, photos, models, diagrams, spreadsheets,
    maps, etc.

127
Performances
  • are temporal and observable
  • examples debates, role plays, music recitals,
    dramas, athletic events, discussions, etc.

128
Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening A
Developmental Perspective K-2
  • Sculptures
  • Models
  • Observation notes
  • Captions
  • Story boards
  • Joke-telling
  • Murals
  • Diorama
  • Graphs
  • Charts
  • Checklists
  • Symbol systems
  • Speech to persuade

129
-----------------------Grades 3-5
  • artifact analysis
  • comparative observation
  • play performance
  • newspaper articles
  • math matrix design
  • extended research
  • reports
  • note cards
  • interview questions
  • short stories
  • photo essaytext

130
Grades 6-8
  • the essay, the essay, the essay....
  • hypothesis testing and telling
  • issue based forums
  • blueprints
  • models
  • museum text/captions
  • four note taking forms
  • organizational templates
  • original playwriting
  • simulations

131
Grades 9-10and 11-12
  • position papers
  • legal briefs
  • business plans
  • anthologies
  • choreography
  • game strategy books
  • film criticism
  • policy statements
  • literary criticism
  • professional journals
  • senior defense project
  • workstudy analysis

132
Skills should be identified precisely
  • within a discipline
  • across disciplines
  • communicated through curriculum maps
  • revealed through assessments
  • linked to essential questions
  • spiraled with nuance and complexity over time

133
Mapping Benchmark Assessments
  • Benchmarks can be designed on multiple levels
    state tests, district, classroom tasks.
  • A school establishes a common set of skills
    needing development.
  • An internally generated benchmark assessment task
    is developed by teachers with the same protocols
    the same timetable.

134
Continued...
  • The task should merge with the ongoing curriculum
    naturally.
  • Student products can then be evaluated both
    vertically and horizontally.
  • Revisions in the curriculum map should reflect a
    few targeted skills needing help.
  • Revisions should be applied thoughtfully to
    developmental characteristics of the learner.

135
Coaching the Mapping Review Process Revision is
a K-12 Journey
  • Curriculum Mapping as a central tool in the
    revision process.
  • Calendar based to reflect the operational
    curriculum
  • Relies on technology to upgrade our communication
  • Opportunity to efficiently and effectively
    improve and invigorate curriculum

136
Wide Angle and ZOOM
137
Procedures
  • PHASE 1 collecting the data
  • PHASE 2 first read-through
  • PHASE 3 small mixed group review
  • PHASE 4 large group comparisons
  • PHASE 5 determine immediate revision points
  • PHASE 6 determine points requiring some research
    and planning
  • PHASE 7 plan for next review cycle

138
Curriculum Mapping Accentuating Language
Capacity phase l Collecting the Data
  • Eventually each teacher in the building completes
    a map
  • The format is consistent for each teacher but
    reflects the individual nature of each classroom
  • Technology simplifies data collection

139
Collecting Content Data
  • type of focus
  • Topics
  • Issues
  • Works
  • Problems
  • Themes
  • configuration
  • Discipline Field based
  • Interdisciplinary
  • Student-Centered

140
Collecting Skill and Assessment Data
  • Enter the skills and assessments FOREGROUNDED for
    each unit of study or course
  • Precision is the key
  • Enter the skills and assessments that are ongoing
    through the course of a year
  • Portfolio checks
  • Early Childhood assessments

141
phase 2 First Read-Through
  • Each teacher reads the entire school map as an
    editor and carried out the tasks.
  • Places where new information was gained are
    underlined.
  • Places requiring potential revision are circled.

142
Gain information on two levels
  • Read through the maps for elements within and
    between grade levels in targeted subject.
  • Eventually tag every skill entry that
    accentuates reading, writing, speaking,
    listening.
  • Identify those assessments that will prove
    revealing for language needs.

143
Edit for Repetitions
  • Recognizing the difference between repetitions
    and redundancy, identify places where titles are
    repeated skills are being introduced where
    assessments become redundant.
  • Spiraling as a goal.

144
Edit for Gaps
  • Gap analysis is possible in content, skills, and
    assessment based on student performance.
  • Precise language strategies in every class.
  • Assessments based on the students ability to
    self-assess and monitor language skills.

145
Validate standards developmentally
  • Search the maps for places where students are
    completing performance tasks that match your
    standards ON A DEVELOPMENTAL BASIS
  • Identify gaps.
  • Familiarize the staff with the language
    underpinning for each standard in every subject.

146
Edit for timeliness
  • Review the maps for timely issues, breakthroughs,
    methods, materials, and new types of assessment.
  • Contemporary genre.
  • Be vigilant about technology.

147
Edit for Coherence
  • Scrutinize maps for a solid match between the
    choice of content, the featured skills
    processes, and the type of assessment.
  • This is called internal alignment!

148
phase 3Mixed Small Group Review
  • Groups of 5 to 8 faculty members are formed.
  • Groups should be from diverse configurations
    (i.e... different grade levels and departments).
  • The goal is to share individual findings from
    personal read through.
  • Identify areas for further work both subject
    area concerns and language strategy needs.
  • No revisions are suggested.

149
phase 4 Large Group Review
  • All faculty members come together and examine the
    compilation of language related findings from the
    smaller groups.
  • Session is facilitated by principal and/or
    teacher leader

150
phase 5Determine areas for immediate revision
  • The faculty identifies those areas that can be
    handled by the site with relative ease.
  • These are often repeated materials and units
  • The specific faculty members involved in those
    revisions determine a timetable for action.

151
phase 6Determine those areas requiring long term
planning
  • Faculty members identify those areas requiring
    more R D.
  • These are commonly
  • generating staff development for
  • language strategies
  • creating a common set of editing and revision
    standards
  • establishing building based benchmarks for every
    class
  • bridging transitions between buildings.

152
Professional Learning Communities and Curriculum
Mapping
  • A professional learning community is a place
    where teachers and students care about, look
    after, root for one another and work together for
    the good of the whole, in times of need as well
    as time of celebration.
  • Roland Barth

153
Summary Professional learning community tenets
  • Effective Schools research
  • Clear purpose
  • Required product
  • Flexible grouping
  • Opportunities for collaboration and reflection
  • Establishment of common ground shared vision
  • Most important focus - talk about students

154
Shifting to Site-based Councils and District
Cabinets
  • Streamline decision making with mapping by
    shedding existing structures
  • Set-up site-based teaching and learning councils
    to replace existing structures
  • Create bridges and on-going communication between
    buildings, grade levels, and departments.

155
Technology is necessary to create a new type of
paradigm for successful educational planning!
156
Task Decision Making for Curriculum-The Status
Quo
  • Create a flow chart that reflects the current way
    curriculum decision making occurs in your setting
    (school and/or district).
  • Note all external and internal influences on the
    choices that finally reach the classroom teacher
    and our students.
  • Identify if and how assessment data impacts
    decisions.

157
The Role of the School Curriculum (CM) Councils
158
Building Your Curriculum CM
Councils
  • Meets regularly with diary and projected (and
    eventually, essential) maps
  • Focus on school-based curriculum, assessment, and
    instruction
  • Open to all members of school faculty
  • Representatives selected via a job description
  • Determine future focuses for individual/corporate
    staff development

159
Site-Based Councils
  • Rotate council membership
  • Create a job description
  • Look at the issue of time
  • Plan for future staff development
  • Train new staff members on process of mapping,
    etc. (on-going)
  • Note The principal is a sitting member on the
    council.
  • Consider having teachers serve 1, 2, and 3 years
    so no one is on the council for ever
    (rotation-style)
  • Determine times for meetings lengths of meetings
  • Generate agendas for all to see Remember,
    meetings are always open
  • Determine how teachers will be rewarded for time
    on the council

160
Relationship Between Inter-Schools Curriculum
(CM) Councils
Consider Your Feeder Patterns!
161
Receiving and Feeder School Sites
  • It is critical that you focus on the actual
    pattern of students in a K-12 continuum.
  • Larger districts should keep communication
    regularly channeled within specific feeder
    patterns.
  • In school districts set up with short-grade
    spans, feeder patterns can also play a critical
    role (i.e., K-2 3-5 grade levels in one
    buildingacross grade subjects on the high school
    level).

162
The Role of the District Curriculum (CM) Cabinet
These representatives play a crucial role in your
CM success!
163
Creating The District-Level Curriculum Cabinet
  • After the initial pre-curser Exploration of CM
    Process year (if this can feasibly be done,
    please know it is well worth it!), the CM Cabinet
    usually meets three to four times per year
  • There needs to be a balanced number of
    representation from each sites CM Council

164
Creating The District-Level Curriculum Cabinet
(cont.)
  • It is recommended that the district-level
    technology experts are involved in the CM Cabinet
    especially when utilizing an Internet-based
    Curriculum Mapping system
  • Focuses on district-level curriculum, assessment,
    and instruction questions and concerns
  • When more R D is needed, the CM Cabinet sets up
    Task Forces.

165
The CM RD Task Force(s)
166
What is Needed From the Administrators
  • A clear understanding of why you are leading your
    teachers through this process
  • Can you answer the following questions
  • What is your goal?
  • Why is this important to your
  • school?
  • Can you make the case?

167
Challenges
  • Culture and climate
  • Trust
  • Honesty
  • Time
  • Creating ownership and buy-in

168
Connecting to Other Initiatives
  • How will mapping help you meet other initiatives
    in your building or district?
  • How does mapping provide a hub for your district?
  • Illustrate these connections to your staff

169
CM Implementation Plan and Timeline
  • Creating a Professional Development Projected
    Map!
  • What will the steps be and who will be
    responsible along the way?
  • What are the mapping goals for the first year,
    second year, ?
  • What skills will the staff need to be successful
    at completing the goals?
  • What products/evidence will they produce?
  • What resources will be incorporated in the
    process?
  • How will the mappers and staff developers get
    feedback?
  • How will you ensure quality?

170
Goals
  • What do you hope to accomplish with your staff
    this year?
  • How will you use the allocated staff development
    time?

171
Essential Questions
  • What are the broad, overarching questions that
    tie all staff development together for coming
    school year?
  • What is the focus?
  • Why are we doing this?

172
Content
  • The initiative
  • The concept
  • The topic
  • The essential components that you plan to address
    in the training.

173
Skills
  • What are the skills that you want your staff to
    know and be able to do as a result of the staff
    development training?
  • What are the action steps that you plan to focus
    on during the training
  • These are written in action verb form

174
Evidence/Product
  • How will you know that your teachers understand
    what was presented?
  • What will you accept as evidence?
  • Written in noun form

175
Timeline/Assignment
  • What will be required of teachers to complete
    following the staff development session?
  • When will it be due?

176
Understand the Process
  • Participate in the training
  • Become knowledgeable of the process
  • Set the tone
  • Create your own map

177
Creating A Map
  • Administrators can create a map for implementing
    curriculum mapping
  • See sample
  • What might your map of
  • mapping look like?

178
Time and Scheduling
  • Creative ways to work around time and scheduling
    issues
  • early release
  • late starts
  • staff in-service days
  • extended contract
  • providing floating substitute teachers

179
District/Building Leadership
  • Those leading the charge must know why this is
    important
  • Form a steering committee
  • Administrative involvement THIS IS CRUCIAL
  • Connect to district initiatives
  • Create a 3-year plan and communicate that plan to
    all staff before you begin

180
Heads-Up Meeting
  • Classroom teachers from multiple levels
  • Special Education
  • Related Arts
  • Administrators
  • Curriculum leaders
About PowerShow.com