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What do the words "dementia friendly community" mean to people with dementia?

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Title: What do the words "dementia friendly community" mean to people with dementia?


1
What do the words "dementia friendly community"
mean to people with dementia? March
2012 Steve Milton Director Innovations in
Dementia (CIC)
2
Im sorry to tell you that you have the very
early symptoms of Alzheimers Disease? What now?
3
A dementia friendly community can be defined as
being one in which it is possible for the
greatest number of people to live a good life
with dementia .. where people with dementia
are enabled to live as independently as possible
and to continue to be part of their community,
.but at the same time are met with
understanding and given support where necessary.
4
  • A dementia-friendly community is described by
    people with dementia as one that enables them to
  • find their way around and be safe,
  • access the local facilities that they are used
    to (such as banks, shops, cafes, cinemas and post
    offices)
  • ..and maintain their social networks so they
    feel they belong in the community.

5
Findings from DH Dementia and Big Society
ThinkTank March 2011
6
  • People told us about the things which make the
    difference in a dementia-capable community
  •  
  • The physical environment
  • Local facilities especially the people
  • Support services
  • Social networks
  • Local groups
  • This is town with a 'heart' - where the High St
    is the hub and where there is a community centre,
    health centre and day centre with regular events
    and services which are well-publicised
    (supporter from a small town)

7
  • People told us they had stopped doing things in
    their community because
  •  
  • Their dementia had progressed and they were
    worried about their ability to cope
  • They were concerned that people didnt understand
    or know about dementia
  • Almost without exception people blamed
    dementia, rather than shortcomings in the
    environment or community.
  • Very low expectations.

8
  • People told us that they would like to be able
    to
  •  
  • Pursue hobbies and interests
  • Simply go out more
  • Make more use of local facilities
  • Help others in their community by volunteering
  • People told us that 1-1 informal support was the
    key to helping them do these things.

9
  • People told us that communities could become more
    dementia-capable by
  •  
  • Increasing their awareness of dementia
  • How?
  • Communities need knowledgeable input, not least
    from people with dementia
  • There needs to be continued media attention and
    public awareness campaigns
  • Dementia needs to be normalised

10
  • and by making mainstream services and facilities
    can be more accessible for people with dementia.
  • People have told us that to do this
  • Communities need knowledgeable input, not least
    from people with dementia
  • Communities should make better use of existing
    resources
  • Organisations should work together more
    effectively

11
Where might you start building a
dementia-friendly community? The voices of
people with dementia and their carers should be
at the start and the heart of the process of
creating dementia-friendly communities. Dementia-
friendly communities need to be responsive to
what people want, but perhaps more importantly,
people with dementia should have the right to
have a sense of ownership, investment,
responsibility and of connectedness to their own
communities.
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