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Florida Association of School Nurses 10th Annual Conference

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Title: PowerPoint Presentation Author: Diane Mennitt Last modified by: Marsha Studdard Created Date: 12/28/2004 8:52:06 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Florida Association of School Nurses 10th Annual Conference


1
Florida Association of School Nurses 10th Annual
Conference
  • January 29, 2005
  • Orlando, Florida

Florida Department of Education Update
Dianne Mennitt, MS, RN School Nurse
Consultant Student Support Services
Project http//sss.usf.edu
2
Florida Department of Education
  • John Winn, Commissioner of Education
  • Strategic Goals
  • Highest Student Achievement
  • Seamless Articulation and Maximum Access
  • Skilled Workforce and Economic Development
  • Quality, Efficient Services

3
K-12 Public Schools
  • Jim Warford, Chancellor
  • http//www.fldoe.org
  • http//www.firn.edu/doe/commhome/

4
  • Bambi Lockman, Bureau Chief, Exceptional
    Education and Student Services
  • The Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student
    Services (BEESS) administers programs for
    students with disabilities and for gifted
    students. Additionally, the bureau coordinates
    student services throughout the state and
    participates in multiple inter-agency efforts
    designed to strengthen the quality and variety of
    services available to students with special
    needs.

5
Education Goal
  • All children with disabilities receive a free,
    appropriate public education in the least
    restrictive environment that promotes a high
    quality education and prepares them for
    employment and independent living.

6
Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)
  • The term FAPE means special education and related
    services that
  • Have been provided at public expense, under
    public supervision direction, and without
    charge
  • Meet the standards of the State Education Agency
    (SEA)
  • Are provided in conformity with the IEP

7
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE)
  • To the maximum extent appropriate, students with
    disabilities are educated with students who are
    not disabled
  • Removal of students with disabilities from
    regular education occurs only if the nature or
    severity of the disability is such that education
    in regular classes with the use of supplementary
    aides and services cannot be achieved
    satisfactorily

8
Floridas 2004 Hurricane Season
  • Tropical Depression Bonnie
  • Hurricane Charley
  • Hurricane Frances
  • Hurricane Ivan
  • Hurricane Jeanne

www.floridadisaster.org
9
Hurricanes School Closures
  • All 67 school districts missed at least one day
  • 29 districts missed 1-5 days
  • 24 districts missed 6-10 days
  • 14 districts missed 11-21 days

10
Hurricanes
  • Flexibility to Make Up Missed Days
  • Waiver of 180-Day Requirement
  • Delay in Administration of FCAT
  • Hurricane School Grade Appeal Option
  • Working with USDOE on an Appeals Process for
    Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) due to Hardships
  • Extensions to Report Deadlines

11
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12
Overview Topics
  • IDEA Reauthorization
  • Graduation
  • Middle Grades Reform
  • Third Grade Student Progression
  • Accountability
  • Voluntary Pre-K Education Program

13
IDEA Reauthorization
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education
    Improvement Act (IDEIA) of 2004
  • H.R. 1350 Passed by Congress
  • Signed by President Bush on December 3, 2004
  • Public Law No 108-446 http//thomas.loc.gov/

14
Amendment to IDEA
  • Part A--General Provisions
  • Sec. 602. Definitions. (26) Related Services.--
  • (A) In general.--The term related services
    means transportation, and such developmental,
    corrective, and other supportive services
    (including speech-language pathology and
    audiology services, physical and occupational
    therapy, recreation, including therapeutic
    recreation, social work services, school nurse
    services designed to enable a child with a
    disability to receive a free appropriate public
    education as described in the individualized
    education program of the child, counseling
    services

15
State Improvement Goals
  • Students with disabilities will have increased
    participation and improved performance in the
    general education curriculum, statewide
    assessments, and accountability systems
  • All schools will provide positive, effective, and
    safe learning environments.
  • Students with disabilities will achieve positive
    post-school outcomes

16
Performance Indicators for Graduation
Are high school graduation rates and drop out
rates for students with disabilities comparable
to graduation rates and drop out rates for
non-disabled students?
17
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21
Middle Grades Reform
  • Rigorous Reading Requirement for Schools and
    Personalized Success Plans for Students are being
    implemented this year
  • Will examine data next year to determine any
    effects of these initiatives

22
Middle Grades Reform
  • Comprehensive Middle Grades Reform Study
  • DOE is completing the study this fall
  • Commissioner will make recommendations for reform
    to SBOE and Legislative Leadership
  • Report will include
  • Background on Florida middle schools, other
    states middle school initiatives, and national
    research
  • Public input, public forums, and Task Force
    findings
  • Commissioners recommendations

23
Middle Grades Reform
  • Middle Grades Reform Task Force
  • Include middle school teachers, principals,
    assistant principals, superintendents, school
    board and parent representatives, district
    curriculum supervisors, Just Read, Florida!,
    FCRR, university faculty
  • Are reviewing and deliberating information on
    middle grades areas specified in legislation
  • Reforms in Florida may include
  • Credit-base system
  • Uniform grading scale
  • Reading initiatives

24
FCAT Reading Performance
25
FCAT Mathematics Performance
26
2003 and 2004 Third Grade Data
27
Number of Students Taking 3rd Grade FCAT
28
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29
2004 Third Grade Reading FCAT
  • The percentage of third graders scoring Level 1
    has dropped from 29 percent in 2001 to 22 percent
    in 2004
  • In the same period, the percentage of third
    graders scoring at Level 3 or above has increased
    from 57 percent to 66 percent.

30
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31
2004 Third Grade Reading FCAT
  • Increases in students scoring at Level 3 or above
    (and corresponding decreases in Level 1) can be
    seen in all racial/ethnic categories, but most
    dramatically among minorities.

32
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34
3rd Graders Scoring at Level 1
  • 44,109 third grade students (21) scored at level
    one in 2004. Of these students
  • 82 were eligible for free/reduced lunch
  • 41 were in programs for students with
    disabilities
  • 31 were limited English proficient
  • 47 were limited English proficient and/or
    disabled
  • 53 were neither limited English proficient nor
    disabled

35
Student Progression
  • Progression of Retained Third Graders
  • Each district must provide a retained third
    grader who has received intensive instruction but
    is not ready for promotion, the option of being
    placed in a transitional setting.
  • Such a transitional setting must be specifically
    designed to produce learning gains sufficient to
    meet grade 4 performance standards while
    continuing to remediate the areas of reading
    deficiency.

36
Accountability School Grades and AYP
37
Floridas Single Accountability System
Measures Working Together
  • School Grades (A)
  • Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

38
Accountability
  • No Child Left Behind
  • (NCLB) federal law
  • Requires all states to utilize state assessments
    (FCAT Sunshine State Standards) to determine if a
    school has made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in
    the proficiency of all students

39
Nine Groups are Evaluated for AYP
  • Total School Population
  • White
  • Black
  • Hispanic
  • Asian
  • American Indian
  • Economically Disadvantaged
  • Limited English Proficient (LEP)
  • Students with Disabilities (SWD)

40
2004 Criteria for Measuring AYP
  • Test 95 of the enrolled students
  • 31 of students reading at or above
  • grade level
  • 38 of students scoring at or above grade level
    in Math
  • Meet the States other criteria
  • The school must improve performance in writing by
    1
  • The school must improve the graduation rate by 1
  • The school must not earn a D or F

41
Accountability http//schoolgrades.fldoe.org
42
Accountability - School Grades by School Type
A B C D F TOTAL
Elementary 962 319 259 62 10 1,612
Middle 197 117 137 25 17 493
High 35 66 159 83 15 358
Combination 68 38 60 14 7 187
TOTAL 1,262 540 615 184 49 2,650
43
Accountability
A Plan A Plan NCLB NCLB
School Grade Number of Schools AYP Criteria Satisfied Number of Schools
A 1,262 90 or more 1,154
B 540 80 or more 476
C 615 70 or more 511
D 184 60 or more 141
F 49 50 or more 40
44
Accountability - Adequate Yearly Progress 2004
AYP 2004 No Yes Total
Elementary 1,112 613 1,725
Middle 471 48 519
High 485 18 503
Combination 281 40 321
Total 2,349 719 3,068
45
Accountability - School Grade Changes
  • Changes for 2004-05
  • Raise Writing proficiency to 3.5
  • Include students with disabilities and limited
    English proficiency in learning gains
  • FCAT scores only (not alternate assessments)
  • Full academic year (enrolled in Survey 2 and 3)
  • Changes for 2006-2007
  • Raise Writing proficiency to a 4.0
  • Include FCAT Science proficiency, Grade 11

46
Accountability 2004 AYP
  • For the 2003-04 goal of 31 of students
    proficient in reading,14/71 districts met or
    exceeded this goal for students with
    disabilities.
  • Alachua 38
  • Brevard 33
  • Citrus 31
  • Clay 38
  • Leon 38
  • Martin 38
  • Okaloosa 38
  • St. Johns 34
  • Santa Rosa 39
  • Sarasota 35
  • Seminole 34
  • Wakulla 38
  • FSU Lab 50
  • UF Lab 39

47
Voluntary Pre-K (VPK) Education Program
  • Dec 04-Florida House and Senate passed VPK bills
  • Governor approved HB 1 on Jan 2, 2005
  • Authorizes parents to enroll their children in
    voluntary, free pre-kindergarten starting 2005
    school year
  • 540 hour school-year program
  • 300 hour summer program

48
Voluntary Universal Pre-K
  • Preliminary estimates For 2005-06, 152,796
    children (70 of September 2003 census of 218,537
    four-year olds) will be served through as many as
    10,000 VPK providers in Florida
  • Transfers operation of school readiness system to
    Agency for Workforce Innovation (AWI) and renames
    school readiness coalitions to early learning
    coalitions.

49
VPK Activities
  • Develop emergent literacy curriculum standards
  • Adopt Pre-K performance standards
  • Statewide kindergarten readiness screening
  • Consolidation to 30 or fewer coalitions to serve
    at least 2,000 children
  • Educational credentials, Child Development
    Associate (CDA) or state equivalent credentials
    (www.cdacouncil.org), background screening
    requirements

50
Problem-Solving Initiative
  • AYP Disaggregated Data (NCLB) focus attention to
    student progress, not student labels
  • Building principals and superintendents want to
    know if students are achieving benchmarks,
    regardless of the students type
  • Accurate placements do not guarantee that
    students will be exposed to interventions that
    maximize their rate of progress
  • Effective interventions result from good
    problem-solving, rather than testing and
    placement
  • Progress monitoring is done best with authentic
    assessment that are sensitive to small changes in
    student academic and social behavior

51
Problem-solving
  • A process that uses the skills of professionals
    from different disciplines to develop and
    evaluate intervention plans that improve
    significantly the school performance of students

52
Problem-solving
  • Can be applied to the student, classroom,
    building and county/district levels
  • Student-academic and/or behavior problem
  • Classroom- discipline, returning homework
  • Building- bullying, attendance
  • County/District- over-/under-representation
  • Problem- any problem shared by numbers of
    students

53
Problem-solving What It Is and Is Not
  • What it is.
  • A process designed to maximize student
    achievement
  • A method focused on outcomes
  • A method to ensure accountability and
    intervention evaluation
  • It is all about student progress, regardless of
    where or who that student is
  • What it is not
  • A way to avoid special education placements
  • A less expensive way of schooling

54
Implications for Problem-solving Teams
  • Services must link with accountability systems
    (AYP, FCAT, NCLB)
  • Intervention plans must attend to academic
    progress issues (Reading!)
  • Response to intervention will be a primary
    eligibility criteria for access to additional
    services
  • Effective problem solving process a high priority

55
Student Outcomes
  • Assessment focus will move to authentic criterion
    http//www.fcrr.org/assessment/index.htm
  • Implement evidence-based Interventions
  • Program/intervention accountability a priority
  • Less process, more outcome

56
Steps in the Problem-solving Process
  • Identify replacement behavior
  • 2. Determine expectation level
  • 3. Develop hypotheses( brainstorming)
  • 4. Develop predictions/assessment
  • 5. Develop interventions in those areas for which
    data are available and hypotheses verified
  • 6. Collect data for hypotheses not verified
  • 7. Follow-up schedule and data sharing

57
Problem Solving Process
58
Multi-Level Process
Amount of Resources Needed to Solve the Problem
  • Adapted From Heartland, IA
  • AEA Model

Intensity of Problem
59
Enabling Components
  • School systems are not responsible for meeting
    every need of their students. But when the need
    directly affects learning, the school must meet
    the challenge.

60
Enabling Component 1
  • Classroom-based Approaches to Enable Learning
  • Pediculosis management
  • Hand washing and personal hygiene instruction
    with students and staff to prevent the spread of
    germs
  • Blood borne pathogens training to prevent
    disease transmission in the school population

61
Enabling Component 2
  • Home School Involvement
  • Health assessment and care planning for students
    with allergies, asthma, diabetes, seizures
  • Ongoing communication regarding students
    response to health interventions
  • Facilitate family involvement to partner with
    school health staff

62
Enabling Component 3
  • Student and Family Assistance
  • Health screenings (vision, hearing, etc.)
  • Medication administration
  • Individual healthcare plans for students with
    health needs during school

63
Enabling Component 4
  • Crises/Emergency Assistance Prevention
  • Emergency planning for students with
    physical/mental impairments
  • CPR First Aid
  • Child abuse prevention training
  • EMS-C collaboration to prevent/reduce injuries at
    school

64
Enabling Component 5
  • Community Outreach/Volunteers
  • Community Health referrals and resources
  • Multidisciplinary collaboration with health care
    providers
  • School volunteer assistance
  • Facilitate parent groups

65
Enabling Component 6
  • Support for Transitions
  • Facilitate transfer of required school-entry
    health documentation (health exam required
    immunizations)
  • Developmentally appropriate health education to
    promote healthy lifestyles

66
  • Great things are done by people who think great
    thoughts and then go out into the world to make
    their dreams come true.
  • Ernest Holmes

67
Thank You!
  • Questions/Comments
  • dmennitt_at_tempest.coedu.usf.edu
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