Overview of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act Reauthorized January 2002 by NCLB (Subtitle B of Title VII) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Overview of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act Reauthorized January 2002 by NCLB (Subtitle B of Title VII) PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 5b5910-MDAwN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Overview of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act Reauthorized January 2002 by NCLB (Subtitle B of Title VII)

Description:

Reauthorized January 2002 by NCLB (Subtitle B of Title VII) Kendra J. Vandertie, School Social Worker Education for Homeless Children & Youth Appleton Area School ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:109
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 26
Provided by: SER474
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Overview of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act Reauthorized January 2002 by NCLB (Subtitle B of Title VII)


1
Overview of the McKinney-Vento Homeless
Assistance ActReauthorized January 2002 by NCLB
(Subtitle B of Title VII)
  • Kendra J. Vandertie, School Social Worker
  • Education for Homeless Children Youth
  • Appleton Area School District
  • September 2011

2
How many children and youth experience
homelessness?
  • 1.37 million children (NAEHCY 2009)
  • 15 of all children living in poverty (Urban
    Institute,,2010)
  • 1 out of 8 (12) children in the Fox Valley are
    living in poverty (Post-Crescent, 9/11)
  • Over 40 of all
  • children who are
  • homeless are
  • under the age
  • of 5 (Urban Institute, 2000)

3
Causes of Homelessness
  • Primary cause is lack of affordable housing
  • Sudden loss of income
  • Health problems
  • Natural and other disasters
  • Domestic violence
  • Abuse/neglect (unaccompanied youth)

4
Barriers to Education forHomeless Children and
Youth
  • Enrollment requirements
  • High mobility resulting in lack of school
    stability and educational continuity
  • Lack of access to programs
  • Lack of transportation
  • Lack of school supplies, clothing, etc.
  • Poor health, fatigue, hunger
  • Prejudice and misunderstanding
  • Stress/Trauma

5
McKinney-VentoHomeless Assistance Act
  • Main themes
  • Eligibility
  • Homeless Liaisons
  • Identification
  • School stability
  • School access/equal access
  • Support for academic success
  • Child-centered, best interest decision making

6
EligibilityWho is Covered?
  • Children who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate
    nighttime residence
  • Doubled Up
  • Living in motels, hotels, trailer park, camping
    grounds due to lack of adequate alternative
    accommodations
  • Living in emergency or transitional shelters
  • Abandoned in hospitals
  • Awaiting foster care placement
  • Living in a public or private place not designed
    for humans to live
  • Living in cars, parks, abandoned buildings, bus
    or train stations, etc.
  • Migratory children living in any of the above
    circumstances
  • Unaccompanied youth

7
McKinney-VentoHomeless Assistance Act
  • Main themes
  • Eligibility
  • Homeless Liaisons
  • Identification
  • School stability
  • School access/equal access
  • Support for academic success
  • Child-centered, best interest decision making

8
Local HomelessEducation Liaisons
  • There is a Federal-Level Coordinator of Homeless
    Education (Federal law supercedes state and local
    laws where there is a conflict. US Constitution,
    Article VI)
  • Every state must have a State Coordinator of
    Homeless Education
  • Every public school district must
  • have a Homeless Liaison http//dpi.wi.gov/homel
    ess/pdf/liaison-contacts.pdf

9
McKinney-VentoHomeless Assistance Act
  • Main themes
  • Eligibility
  • Homeless Liaisons
  • Identification and Enrollment
  • School stability
  • School access/equal access
  • Support for academic success
  • Child-centered, best interest decision making

10
Identification Strategies
  • Provide awareness activities for all school staff
  • Coordinate with community service agencies
    serving homeless
  • Provide outreach materials and posters where
    there is a frequent influx of low-income families
    and youth in high-risk situations
  • Use enrollment and withdrawal forms to inquire
    about living situations
  • Have students draw or write about where they live
  • Avoid using the word "homeless" in initial
    contacts with school personnel, families, or
    youth

11
Segregation
  • States are prohibited from segregating homeless
    students in separate schools, separate programs
    within schools, or separate settings within
    schools
  • SEAs and LEAs (State and Local Education Agency)
    must adopt policies and practices to ensure that
    homeless children and youth are not segregated or
    stigmatized on the basis of their status as
    homeless

12
McKinney-VentoHomeless Assistance Act
  • Main themes
  • Eligibility
  • Homeless Liaisons
  • Identification
  • School stability
  • School access/equal access
  • Support for academic success
  • Child-centered, best interest decision making

13
School StabilityKey Provisions
  • School of Origin (School attended when
    permanently housed or in which last enrolled)
  • Homeless children and youth have the right to
    enroll in school immediately even if they do not
    have required documents
  • Enrolling schools must obtain school records from
    the previous school and students must be enrolled
    in school while records are obtained.
  • Districts (liaisons) must assist the family in
    obtaining immunizations, immunization records, or
    medical records. In the meantime, the student
    must be enrolled and attending classes.

14
Research on School Mobility
  • Students who switch schools frequently score
    lower on standardized tests.
  • Mobility also hurts non-mobile students study
    found average test scores for non-mobile students
    were significantly lower in high schools with
    high student mobility rates.
  • It takes children an average of 4-6 months to
    recover academically after changing schools.
  • Students suffer psychologically, socially, and
    academically from mobility mobile students are
    less likely to participate in extracurricular
    activities and more likely to act out or get into
    trouble.
  • Mobility during high school greatly diminishes
    the likelihood of graduation study found
    students who changed high schools even once were
    less than half as likely as stable students to
    graduate, even controlling for other factors.

15
TransportationKey Provisions
  • LEAs must offer students experiencing
    homelessness with transportation to and from
    their school of origin
  • If the students temporary residence and the
    school of origin are in the same LEA, that LEA
    must provide or arrange transportation if the
    student is living outside of the school of
    origins LEA, the LEA where the student is living
    and the school of origins LEA must determine how
    to divide the responsibility and share the cost,
    or they must share the cost equally

16
Transportation Strategies
  • Re-route school buses (including special
    education)
  • Provide passes for public transportation
  • Reimburse parents or unaccompanied youth for gas
  • Collaborate with the parent for the best mode of
    transportation at the most economical rate
  • Use approved taxi services

17
Resolution of DisputesKey Provisions
  • Every state and public school district must
    establish dispute resolution procedures
  • When a dispute over enrollment arises, the
    student must be admitted immediately to the
    school of choice while the dispute is being
    resolved (includes unaccompanied youth)

18
Unaccompanied Youth
  • Revise LEA policies to accommodate unaccompanied
    youth and comply with the McKinney-Vento Act
  • Revise enrollment forms
  • Provide opportunity to enroll in diversified
    learning opportunities
  • Provide a safe place and trained mentor at
    school for unaccompanied youth to access as
    needed
  • Permit exceptions to school policies
  • Assist with credit accrual and recovery

19
Preschool-Aged Children
  • Liaisons must ensure that families and children
    have access to Head Start, Even Start, and other
    public preschool programs (Title-I) administered
    by the LEA
  • The McKinney-Vento Act also applies to Head Start
    with the 2007 reauthorization of the Head Start
    Act (Exemptions transportation to school of
    origin and immediate enrollment)
  • Coordinate with IDEA (Individuals with
    Disabilities Education Act) Child Find
  • Ask parents enrolling school-aged children if
    there are any preschool children

20
McKinney-VentoHomeless Assistance Act
  • Main themes
  • Eligibility
  • Homeless Liaisons
  • Identification
  • School stability
  • School access/equal access
  • Support for academic success
  • Child-centered, best interest decision making

21
Access to Services
  • Students who experience homelessness must have
    access to educational services for which they are
    eligible
  • Undocumented children and youth have the same
    right to attend public school as U.S. citizens
    and are covered by the McKinney-Vento Act to the
    same extent as other children and youth (Plyler
    v. Doe)
  • USDA policy permits liaisons and shelter
  • directors to obtain free school meals for
  • students by providing a list of names of
  • students experiencing homelessness
  • with effective dates

22
McKinney-VentoHomeless Assistance Act
  • Main themes
  • Eligibility
  • Homeless Liaisons
  • Identification
  • School stability
  • School access/equal access
  • Support for academic success
  • Child-centered, best interest decision making

23
Title I and HomelessnessKey Provisions
  • A child or youth who is homeless and is attending
    any school in the district is automatically
    eligible for Title I A services
  • LEAs must reserve (or set aside) funds as are
    necessary to provide services comparable to those
    provided to children in Title I A schools to
    serve homeless children who do not attend
    participating schools, including providing
    educational support services to children in
    shelters and other locations where homeless
    children may live
  • Title I can provide academic supports such as
    reading assistance, tutoring, etc.

24
Subgrants - Wisconsin
  • Services provided with McKinney-Vento grant funds
    must not replace the regular academic program and
    must be designed to expand upon or improve
    services provided as part of the schools regular
    academic program
  • Appleton
  • Ashwaubenon
  • Green Bay
  • Hayward
  • Wisconsin Rapids
  • Madison
  • Milwaukee
  • Platteville
  • Superior
  • Racine
  • Tomah
  • Kenosha
  • Eau Claire
  • Middleton-Cross Plaines
  • Janesville
  • West Allis

25
Helpful Resources (Bibliography)
  • National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty
    (NLCHP) 202-638-2535 http//www.nlchp.org
  • National Association for the Education of
    Homeless Children and Youth (NAEHCY)

    202-364-7392 http//www.naehcy.org
  • National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE)
    800-308-2145 http//serve.org/nche
  • Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction,
    Education of Homeless Children and Youth Program,
    Lara Kain, 608-267-7338 http//dpi.wi.gov/homeles
    s/
  • Appleton Area School District, Homeless Education
    Program Coordinator, Kendra Vandertie,
    920-997-1399 x3006
About PowerShow.com