World Conference on Early Childhood Care and Education WC ECCE 27 to 29 September 2010 Moscow, Russian Federation - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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World Conference on Early Childhood Care and Education WC ECCE 27 to 29 September 2010 Moscow, Russian Federation

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Title: Inclusive Approaches in Education Author: Kenneth Last modified by: Created Date: 3/5/2006 3:16:40 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: World Conference on Early Childhood Care and Education WC ECCE 27 to 29 September 2010 Moscow, Russian Federation


1
World Conference on Early Childhood Care and
EducationWC ECCE27 to 29 September 2010
Moscow, Russian Federation
2
Early inequity leads to lifelong inequity in
learning outcomes and educational opportunities
In Ecuador, a study of 3- to 5-year-olds marks a
clear association between a childs cognitive
score and the familys socioeconomic status. The
gap begins early and widens over time.
Source UNESCO, Global Monitoring Report 2010,
from Paxson and Schady (2005).
3
Vulnerable children excluded from ECCE programmes
3-to 5-year olds from urban areas or with
educated mothers are more likely to participate
in early learning programmes
Source UNICEF, Multiple Indicator Cluster
Surveys (MICS3).
4
Varied access to programmes for children under
age 3
  • Countries in region with at least one formal
    programme including children under 3 ()

Source UNESCO, EFA Global Monitoring Report .
5
Wide variation in pre-primary participation
across regions
Pre-primary gross enrolment ratio () in 2008
Source UNESCO, EFA Global Monitoring Report 2011.
6
Human Brain Development Synapse
FormationEarly childhood is an optimal moment to
support sensory, cognitive, social language
development
Language
Sensing
Pathways
Higher
Cognitive Function
(vision, hearing)
9
0
1
4
8
12
16
3
6
-3
-6
Months
Years
Conception
AGE
C. Nelson, in From Neurons to Neighborhoods, 2000
7
Heckmans curve - rates of return to human
capital investments across all ages
Heckman, 2008 Schools, Skills, and Synapses
8
  • Early Childhood Care and Education providing for
    holistic attention that include health,
    nutrition, early stimulation and protection,
    resulting in
  • Better school readiness, attendance, learning,
    internal efficiency
  • Improved early brain development
  • Improved cognitive development and primary school
    achievement
  • Higher school enrolment
  • Reduced drop out rates
  • Improved delivery of nutrition and health
    services
  • Reduced risks of social delinquency
  • Gender parity

9
  • Studies point to significant relationships
    between cognitive achievement and school
    expenditure, teachers and practitioners
    educational training and adequate play and
    learning facilities
  • School performance (as measured by test scores)
    is significantly improved by textbook provision,
    smaller class sizes, adequate instructional time
    and sound teaching practices, including an age
    appropriate curricula
  • Policy development should target disadvantaged
    and vulnerable groups and aim towards gender
    equality and inclusive education

10
Examples of successful quality interventions
  • Health sector-based intervention
  • e.g. Posyandu (health service post) in
    Indonesia combining basic health services with
    parenting education
  • Welfare sector-based intervention
  • e.g. Conditional cash transfer in Mexico,
    Nicaragua
  • Education sector-based intervention
  • e.g. Community-based ECD centres in disadvantaged
    areas in Nepal Madrasa Preschool Programme in
    East African countries
  • e.g. Non-formal education programme for parents
    to promote better parenting in rural Tanzania
  • Multi-sectoral intervention
  • e.g. Parenting education for parents with
    children 0-6 Educate Your Child of Cuba and
    Better Early Childhood of Brazil

11
Strong foundations
Early childhood care and education
Global Launch
New York26 October 2006
12
A diverse field
Informal care and child rearing
Organized care and education
- parental leave
13
Action Now!
Clear progress but more effort is needed
  1. Act on all goals early childhood,literacy and
    primary school
  2. Act with urgency
  3. Emphasize equity and inclusion
  4. Increase public spending, and focus it better
  5. Increase aid to basic education, and allocate
    where most needed
  6. Move ECCE up national and international agendas
  7. Increase public financing for ECCE, and target it
  8. Upgrade the ECCE workforce

14
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15
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16
General information
  • Origin Resolution 35 C/Resolution 15 adopted by
    the General Conference in October 2009
  • Dates 27-29 September 2010
  • Sponsors Russian Federation, ADEA, Saudi Arabia
    Fund, UNICEF, UNDP, ED/BAS, RBs and other FOs

16
17
Conference objectives
  • Heighten global awareness of ECCE as the right of
    all children and as development imperative
  • Encourage a dynamic and far-reaching reflection
    on the transformative powers of ECCE and
    reinforce its role as a basis for development
  • Take stock of progress, identify challenges and
    establish more effective benchmarks towards
    achieving Education for All
  • Engage governments, policy-makers, researchers
    and a range of institutions in reorienting
    national systems and programmes to take into
    account the early childhood years as a human
    right and an integral part of development
  • Promote global exchange of good practices

17
18
Programme main thrust
  • Opening The ECCE global challenge - Setting the
    stage
  • Plenary I The ECCE development imperative
  • Plenary II The global state of the art Scaling
    up towards 2015
  • Commission 1 Enabling the scale-up towards 2015
    Policy, finance, legal and institutional
    frameworks
  • Commission 2 Regions / Russian Federation
  • Plenary III ECCE country best practices
  • Commission 3 Quality and responsiveness
  • Commission 4 Exclusion and marginalization
  • Commission 5 Monitoring and evaluation of ECCE
    at national and international levels
  • Plenary IV Summary of the Conference
  • Plenary V Presentation and adoption of Plan of
    Action
  • Closing The way forward

19
Outcome
  • Moscow Plan of Action on ECCE - an actionable plan

19
20
Post-conference follow-ups
  • Annual virtual review
  • Biannual regional reviews linked to regional
    events (e.g. ADEA 2011)
  • Application of the HCDI to monitor and report
    progress toward 2015 and beyond
  • Post-conference follow-up plans of FO, RB,
    Institutes, HQ

20
21
UNESCOs actions
  • I. Support equitable access to quality ECCE
  • Heightening advocacy and support for ECCE
  • First World Conference on ECCE (Moscow, 2010) and
    the implementation of the Moscow Framework for
    Action and Cooperation
  • Strengthening the analytical and knowledge base
    for ECCE policy development
  • Handbook on ECCE
  • Strengthening national capacities to deliver ECCE
  • ECCE subsector analysis (e.g. Mongolia)
  • Thematic policy review on ECCE integration in
    Rep. of Korea
  • Strengthening global and national capacity for
    monitoring Goal 1
  • Holistic Child Development Index
  • Intensifying resource mobilisation
  • Establishment of UNESCO ECCE Fund

22
Recommendation Leveraging resources (i)
  • Mobilize national resources for primary
    education and ECCE
  • - public and private -
  • and use them more effectively

23
Recommendation Leveraging resources (ii)
  • Increase the levels of donor resources for
    primary education and ECCE - and use them more
    effectively
  • Disbursements of aid to basic education stopped
    increasing in 2008

Source UNESCO, EFA Global Monitoring Report 2011.
24
Recommendation Partnering with UNESCO
  • UN specialized agency for education, with the
    mandate to lead EFA
  • 5 functions - laboratory of ideas,
    standard-setting, clearing house, capacity
    builder, catalyst for international cooperation
  • A strong network of units, offices and
    specialized institutes that enable effective
    delivery in the field
  • Existing partnership mechanisms with external
    partners and networks (e.g. ADEA WGECD, ARNEC)
    for greater impact

25
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26
  • http//www.unesco.org/new/ru/world-conference-on-e
    cce/resources/

27
  • Nota Bene
  • Photos are taken from UNESCO Photobank and from
    the free internet sources ( such as flickr.com
    and others)
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