It Takes a Community: Helping Parents Create a Healthy, Safe Environment for Children with Asthma - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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It Takes a Community: Helping Parents Create a Healthy, Safe Environment for Children with Asthma

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It Takes a Community: Helping Parents Create a Healthy, Safe Environment for Children with Asthma American Association of School Administrators – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: It Takes a Community: Helping Parents Create a Healthy, Safe Environment for Children with Asthma


1
It Takes a Community Helping Parents Create a
Healthy, Safe Environment for Children with
Asthma
  • American Association of School Administrators
  • National School Boards Association

2
Why?
  • Nearly three children in every classroom of 30
    has asthma.
  • If uncontrolled, asthma can be very disruptive to
    a childs school experience at worst, it can be
    fatal.
  • With proper management, a childs asthma can be
    controlled.
  • Creating an asthma-friendly environment benefits
    everyone.

3
What is Asthma?
  • Asthma is a chronic (ongoing, long-term) disease
    that narrows the passageways to the lungs, making
    it difficult to breathe.
  • Children with asthma always have it, but they
    only have trouble breathing when something
    bothers their lungs. These are known as
    triggers.
  • Each persons asthma is unique. Triggers and
    symptoms differ for each person.
  • An asthma attack is when asthma symptoms get out
    of control.

4
When asthma is present, the lungs show
three primary changes
  • Swelling of the lining of the airways,
  • Tightening of the muscle bands around the
    airways, and
  • Excess mucus production, making it difficult to
    breathe.

Normal lung tissue
Lung tissue with asthma
5
Symptoms of Asthma
  • A child may experience one or all of these
    symptoms
  • Wheezing
  • Coughing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Rapid breathing
  • Difficulty talking
  • Tightness in the chest

6
Asthma Medications
  • There are two types of medications to help manage
    asthma
  • Quick Relief Medications
  • Taken immediately at the first sign of symptoms
  • Should be easily available to the child at all
    times
  • Controller Medications
  • Preventive only does not provide relief during
    an asthma attack
  • Usually taken at home

7
Medical Devices that Help Manage Asthma
  • Spacer and Valved Holding Chamber
  • Used with quick relief medications.
  • Helps medication reach deeper into the lungs.
  • Peak Flow Meter
  • Measures air output.
  • Can show signs of symptoms before a child feels
    them.

8
  • Asthma can be controlled, but not cured.
  • Heres what parents can do.

9
Action Steps
  • Complete and Maintain Asthma Action Plans
  • Reduce Asthma Triggers
  • Manage Medications and Master Techniques
  • Encourage Opportunities for Physical Activity
  • Establish and Maintain Good Communication with
    School and Community
  • Provide and/or Take Advantage of Asthma Education

10
Action Step 1 Asthma Action Plans
  • An Asthma Action plan has all the important
    information about a childs asthma in one place.
    Written by a health practitioner, it includes
  • A childs specific asthma triggers
  • Which medications a child takes and when to take
    them
  • What to do if symptoms get worse
  • When to call 911

11
Asthma Action Plans cont.
  • An updated asthma action plan should be completed
    every school year and revised at each doctor
    visit.
  • Provide a copy to the
  • School nurse and other school personnel
  • Out-of-school providers
  • Anyone responsible for the childs care.

12
Action 2 - Reduce Asthma Triggers
Triggers are different for every child with
asthma and may include
  • Pets with fur or feathers
  • Cockroaches
  • Dust mites
  • Pollen
  • Mold
  • Physical activity
  • Colds and flu
  • Smoke
  • Extreme cold, heat or humidity
  • Perfume
  • Cleaning products and air fresheners

13
Action 2 - Reduce Asthma Triggers
  • Take steps to reduce exposure to triggers. Ensure
    children with asthma have
  • A smoke-free environment
  • Pets without dander such as fish
  • A dust-free and mold-free environment, cleaned
    with appropriate cleansers
  • Ensure A/C and ventilation systems are free of
    air pollutants
  • No bus or car idling policies
  • Access to medications before and after exercise,
    if in the Asthma Action Plan

14
Action 3 -- Manage Asthma Medications
  • Quick relief medications should be easily
    available to a child at all times.
  • Self-carry for students who meet school
    districts criteria
  • Back-up emergency medication plan for students
    allowed to self-administer medication
  • Parents obtain at least 3 sets of
    medications/devices (for home, school,
    out-of-school activity)
  • Schools may be a resource to parents in exploring
    insurance options to cover medication costs.

15
Action 4 -- Encourage Opportunities For
Physical Activity
  • Regular exercise is important for all children,
    including those with asthma.
  • Children with asthma, coaches, teachers, and out
    of school providers should know how to manage
    asthma when a child is physically active.
  • Medications and individual childrens asthma
    action plans should be easily accessible.

16
Action 5 -- Establish and Maintain Good
Communication
  • Discuss the childs asthma with school staff and
    out-of-school caregivers.
  • Make sure the child understands his/her
    medications and is able to communicate their
    needs
  • Inform school and caregivers of absences due to
    asthma.

17
Action 6 -- Provide or Take Advantage of Asthma
Education
  • Review and assess policies to see if they are
    asthma friendly.
  • Attend training, and obtain and share information
    about asthma with school personnel.
  • Make sure that the school and district provide
    asthma management and emergency training to all
    staff.
  • Review the health curriculum to see if it
    provides information on asthma and asthma
    management for students.

18
Resources
  • NATIONAL RESOURCES
  • Allergy and Asthma Network/Mothers of Asthmatics
  • American Association of School Administrators
  • American Lung Association
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Environmental Protection Agency
  • National Asthma Education an Prevention
    Program/NIH
  • National Association of School Nurses
  • National PTA
  • National School Boards Association
  • LOCAL RESOURCES

19
Guide for Families, Schools, and Communities
Available on-line at Http//www.aasa.org and at
http//www.nsba.org
20
  • THANK YOU!!
  • This presentation was developed by the American
    Association of School Administrators (AASA) and
    the National School Boards Association (NSBA).
    AASA is the membership organization for local
    school system leaders across the country. NSBA
    represents state associations of school boards
    and their member districts. This presentation was
    developed under a cooperative agreement with the
    Division of Adolescent and School Health of the
    U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    grant number U58/DP 000398-04. Its contents are
    solely the responsibility of the authors and do
    not necessarily represent the official views of
    the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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