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Career and College Planning Hudson Falls Middle School Grade 8 Presentation

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Title: Career and College Planning Hudson Falls Middle School Grade 8 Presentation


1
Career and College PlanningHudson Falls Middle
SchoolGrade 8 Presentation
2
Why Get a College Degree?
  • Knowledge, Skills, and More Opportunities
  • If you go to college, you will gain information
    and skills that you will use for the rest of your
    life, no matter what career you choose. College
    will enable you to
  • Expand your knowledge and skills.
  • Express your thoughts clearly in speech and
    writing.
  • Grasp abstract concepts and theories.
  • Increase your understanding of the world and your
    community.

3
Why Get a College Degree?
  • What this means for you.
  • These benefits may sound great on their own, but
    college also has some very practical benefits.

4
Why Get a College Degree?
  • More Job Opportunities!
  • The world is changing rapidly. More and more
    jobs require education beyond high school.
    College graduates have more jobs to choose from
    than those who do not pursue education beyond
    high school.

5
Why Get a College Degree?
  • Earn More Money!
  • A person who goes to college usually earns more
    than a person who doesnt. According to the U.S.
    Census Bureau, on average, someone with a
    bachelors degree earns 50,900. That is 62
    more than the 31,500 earned annually by someone
    with only a high school diploma.

6
Why Not Go to College?
  • Many students are unsure about attending college
    for many reasons. The following are five reasons
    students have not pursued college and why they
    should NOT prevent YOU from attending.

7
Why Not Go to College?
  • I cant afford it.
  • Most students get financial aid to help pay for
    college, and most aid is based on need. This
    means that the less money you have, the more aid
    you might get.

8
Why Not Go to College?
  • Nobody in my family has ever gone to college.
  • Being first can be difficult. For instance, you
    may have to explain to your family that attending
    college is important to you. On the other hand,
    attending college is likely to be a source of
    pride for you and your family.

9
Why Not Go to College?
  • I dont know what I want to do with my life.
  • Join the crowd! Thousands of college freshman
    have not decided on a major or a career. College
    give you the opportunity to learn more about what
    is out there and to be exposed to a variety of
    academic subjects, people, and new perspectives.

10
Why Not Go to College?
  • College is too difficult for me.
  • Many students think college will be too
    difficult. Keep in mind that all colleges offer
    tutoring and student support. AS confident as
    some students seem, no one goes to college
    knowing everything- otherwise, they would have no
    reason to attend!

11
Why Not Go to College?
  • I just wont fit in.
  • Most colleges have students from many
    backgrounds. To get an idea of what types of
    colleges are available, explore colleges through
    College Search (www.collegeboard.com),
  • or better yet, visit in person.

12
Types of College Degrees
  • Associates Degree-
  • For those planning on entering a technical or
    vocational field, an Associates Degree can be
    helpful.
  • Usually earned in 2 years or less and are
    available community colleges, technical or
    vocational colleges.
  • Students have to option of accumulating credits
    and working toward a Bachelors Degree.

13
Types of College Degrees
  • Bachelors Degree-
  • Also referred to as Undergraduate Degrees and are
    typically four year programs.
  • Students pursuing a Bachelors Degree have to
    study general education courses including
    English, math, science, and social sciences.
  • Students also choose a topic to focus on beyond
    all others called a major.
  • There are different types of Bachelors degrees
    including a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or a Bachelor
    of Science (B.S.).

14
Types of College Degrees
  • Masters Degree-
  • Masters Degree are obtained at a graduate school
    and most programs take two years to complete.
  • A Masters Degree helps advance ones career
    because it implies a mastery of a subject or area
    of study.
  • Some of the most common Masters Degrees are
    Master of Arts (M.A.), Master of Science (M.S)
    or a Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.).

15
Types of Colleges
  • Community and Junior Colleges
  • Community colleges offer a degree after the
    completion of two years of full time study. They
    frequently offer technical programs that prepare
    students for immediate entry into the workforce.

16
Types of Colleges
  • Public vs. Private Colleges
  • Public Colleges are typically less expensive,
    particularly for state residents. They get most
    of the money from state or local government. For
    more information check New York States Guide to
    Residency.
  • Private College rely on tuition, fees, and
    endorsements from private sources. Though
    typically more expensive, private colleges are
    usually smaller and offer more personalized
    attention.

17
Types of Colleges
  • Liberal Arts Colleges
  • Liberal Arts Colleges offer a broad base of
    courses in the humanities, social sciences, and
    sciences. Most are private and focus mainly on
    undergraduate students. Classes tend to be small
    and personal attention is available.

18
Types of Colleges
  • Universities
  • Generally, a university is bigger than a college
    and offers more majors and research facilities.
    Class size is often a reflection of institutional
    size.

19
PLANNING FOR COLLEGE AND YOUR CAREER
  • Planning for your future is not something you do
    once. Its a continuous process. Career
    planning has three steps that you will cycle
    through and repeat throughout your working life.
    By following these steps, you can make career
    decisions that are right for you.

20
PLANNING FOR COLLEGE AND YOUR CAREER
  • Step One-
  • Know Yourself!
  • Evaluate yourself- your strengths, weaknesses,
    interests, and values.

21
PLANNING FOR COLLEGE AND YOUR CAREER
  • Step Two-
  • Explore your options and choose a direction!
  • Explore occupations and training to find careers
    that fit you. Then, narrow down your choices.

22
PLANNING FOR COLLEGE AND YOUR CAREER
  • Step Three-
  • Consider issues that can affect your plans and
    take appropriate actions towards your goals.

23
Planning for College and Your Career
  • Check out our links at www.hfcsd.org
  • Look under Middle School, then School Counseling
  • Then go to our links
  • Scholarshop
  • Choices program
  • BOCES Vocational Programshttp//wswheboces.org/CTE
    /ProgramInformation.htm

24
Planning for College and Your Career
  • Eighth grade
  • It all counts now!
  • March 12, 2009-H.S. info Parent Night 630
  • March 18 and 19, 2009 High School Sched.
  • Sign up to take Advanced Placement Testing before
    March 19,2009

25
PLANNING FOR COLLEGE AND YOUR CAREER
  • Freshman Year-
  • Find out how to make the most out of high school.
  • Develop a four year plan (take challenging
    courses).
  • Get off to a good start with your grades
  • Gain knowledge of high school graduation
    requirements and college admission requirements.
  • Join/continue extracurricular activities.
  • Build relationships with peers, teachers,
    counselors, advisors and employers.
  • Explore career areas that match your interests
    and talents.
  • Meet with you high school counselor to discuss
    college/career information at least once a year
  • Continue/start saving for college.

26
PLANNING FOR COLLEGE AND YOUR CAREER
  • Sophomore Year-
  • Continue to take challenging courses.
  • Learn about the PLAN (pre-ACT) and the PSAT
    (pre-SAT). The PLAN is designed for sophomores.
    Talk with your counselor regarding the
    appropriateness of taking the PSAT this year for
    practice.
  • Use the results of the PLAN to research possible
    career options.
  • Keep exploring careers by using Choices
    (www.bridges.com).
  • Bridges/Choices Site ID 1001346 Password
    hudsonbr2
  • Think about what kind of training and education
    different careers require.
  • Become familiar with general college entrance
    requirements.
  • Work toward leadership positions in activities
    you like best.
  • Become involved in community service and other
    volunteer activities.

27
PLANNING FOR COLLEGE AND YOUR CAREER
  • Junior Year-
  • Continue taking challenging courses, keep your
    grades up, and meet with your counselor.
  • Take the PSAT in October if appropriate.
  • Talk with your parents and high school counselor
    about colleges/technical schools that interest
    you. Learn about their admissions requirements
    and financial aid information.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT test. You should be
    academically ready to take the test by spring.
    If not, you must take it early in your senior
    year.
  • Investigate scholarship opportunities.
  • Take advantage of opportunities to meet with
    college representatives, tour college campuses,
    attend college and career fairs.
  • List, compare, and visit colleges. (Dream
    Schools vs. Safety Schools)
  • Apply for scholarships that are available for
    juniors.
  • Consider putting together a portfolio that
    highlights your special skills and talents.

28
PLANNING FOR COLLEGE AND YOUR CAREER
  • Senior Year-
  • Visit your school counselor to be sure that you
    are on track to graduate and that you fulfill
    college/technical school admissions requirements.
  • Take the SAT and/or SAT if you did not take them
    as a junior or wish to improve your score.
  • Keep working hard all year. Second semester
    grades can affect scholarship eligibility.
  • Attend college fairs, financial aid nights, and
    college planning workshops.
  • Meet with admissions counselors who come to your
    school.
  • Visit colleges and technical schools in which you
    are interested.
  • Meet with military recruiters if interested in
    joining the military.
  • Begin your college essay(s)
  • See your counselor for help finding scholarships
    and financial aid.
  • Ask for personal references from teachers,
    counselors, or employers early in the year or at
    least several weeks prior to your application
    deadlines.
  • Keep track of and observe all DEADLINES for
    applying to college, financial aid, and
    scholarships.
  • Apply for admission to the schools you have
    chosen and have your counselor send your
    transcript.
  • Apply for all scholarships for which you are
    eligible.
  • Complete the Free Application for Federal Student
    Aid (FAFSA) and mail in after January 1st.
  • If you are a college-bound athlete, file with the
    NCAA Clearinghouse.
  • Compare financial aid packages from different
    schools.
  • Decide which college to attend. Notify all
    schools of your decision.
  • Keep track of and observe deadlines for sending
    in all required fees and paperwork.

29
PLANNING FOR COLLEGE AND YOUR CAREER
  • By following these steps, you can make career
    decisions that are right for you. Youll know
    what your options are and what it will take to
    reach your goals!
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