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Implementing the Common Core Literacy Standards for History/Social Studies

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History/Social Studies May 12,2011 Don Gifford History/Government/Social Studies Consultant Kansas State Department of Education Don Gifford Educational Program ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Implementing the Common Core Literacy Standards for History/Social Studies


1
Implementing the Common Core Literacy Standards
forHistory/Social Studies
  • May 12,2011
  • Don Gifford
  • History/Government/Social Studies Consultant
  • Kansas State Department of Education

2
Common Core Standards Document
  • Go to the KSDE Website at www.ksde.org
  • Scroll Down
  • In the Right hand margin you will see the Common
    Core Icon
  • Click on the Icon to the KSDE Common Core site

3
  • That will take you to this page
  • Scroll Down
  • When you get to Common Core English Language Arts
  • Download the PDF for the Common Core ELA

4
  • Page 59 begins the Literacy Section
  • Page 62 Shows the 10 Reading Anchor Standards in
    Grade Bands 6-8, 9-10, and 11-12
  • Banded Writing Anchor Standards are on page 65-66

5
Speaking and Listening Standards
  • Great Stuff for Social Studies Teachers on pages
    49 and 50
  • This would be a great set of standards for Social
    Studies teachers to apply in their classrooms

6
Common Core Literacy Standards
  • The Common Core is organized by grade level
  • K-5, 6-8, 9-10, 11- College and Career Ready
  • Several sets of Literacy Standards (Ill
    concentrate on the first 2)
  • Reading, Writing, Speaking/Listening, Language
  • Reading standards are divided by grade level
    into
  • Key Ideas and Details
  • Craft and Structure
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
  • Writing standards are divided by grade level
    into
  • Text Types and Purposes
  • Production and Distribution of Writing
  • Research to Build and Present Knowledge
  • Range of Writing

7
Change over Time
  • Common Core simply takes the 10 Anchor Standards
    in Reading and Writing and adds levels of
    sophistication over time.

8
Increasing Sophistication
Reading Anchor Standard 9 Integration of
Knowledge and Ideas Analyze how two or more texts
address similar themes or topics in order to
build knowledge or to compare the approaches the
authors take.
  • Kindergarten
  • Grades 11-CCR
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  • 9. Compare and contrast the most important points
    and key details presented in two texts on the
    same topic.
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  • 9. Integrate information from diverse sources,
    both primary and secondary, into a coherent
    understanding of an idea or event, noting
    discrepancies among sources.

9
Reading Anchor Standards
  • Key Ideas and Details
  • 1. Read closely to determine what the text says
    explicitly and to make logical inferences from
    it cite specific textual evidence when writing
    or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the
    text.
  • 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text
    and analyze their development summarize the key
    supporting details and ideas.
  • 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and
    ideas develop and interact over the course of a
    text.

10
Reading Anchor Standards
  • Craft and Structure
  • 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used
    in a text, including determining technical,
    connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze
    how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
  • 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how
    specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
    portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter,
    scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the
    whole.
  • 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the
    content and style of a text.

11
Reading Anchor Standards
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  • 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in
    diverse formats and media, including visually and
    quantitatively, as well as in words.
  • 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and
    specific claims in a text, including the validity
    of the reasoning as well as the relevance and
    sufficiency of the evidence.
  • 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar
    themes or topics in order to build knowledge or
    to compare the approaches the authors take.

12
Reading Anchor Standards
  • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
  • 10. Read and comprehend complex literary and
    informational texts independently and
    proficiently.

13
How do we do this?
  • With the exception of Standard 5 (Text
    Structure) and 10 (Text Complexity) most of you
    are probably already asking this of your
    students.
  • Looking for evidence
  • Central Ideas
  • Causation
  • Vocabulary
  • Point of View and Bias
  • Multiple types of Media
  • Fact or Opinion
  • Primary and Secondary Sources

14
Why Literacy in History/Government/Social Studies?
  • Students are consistently unable to meet the
    demands of reading text within a particular
    discipline.
  • Reading within a discipline is different than
    reading literature.
  • The ability to read within the disciplines is
    important to citizenship.
  • Being literate across a broad range of
    disciplines is required to be considered College
    and Career Ready.

15
Why do I have to teach ELA in my History class?
  • If you have been teaching History well you are
    already teaching literacy.

16
The Literacy Pyramid
  • Grades 10- CCR
  • Grades 5-9
  • Grades K-4

Jargon, Sophisticated Vocabulary, Discipline
specific language
Larger Words, Reading Strategies, Complex
Vocabulary, Text types Text Structures
Language and Text Complexity
Letter Sound Translation, Decoding, Conventions,
Spelling Structures, Simple Vocabulary, Stories
CCR College and Career Ready
17
So what happens as language and text complexity
become more challenging?
  • STUDENTS
  • TEACHERS RESPONSE
  • Look for reading samples with less challenging
    language and text.
  • Try other means to get the information across.
  • Continue to do what works
  • Having students that dont read well usually
    results in teachers having them read less, not
    more.
  • Struggle with comprehension
  • Student continue to struggle
  • Students do better
  • Students never learn to read within the
    discipline.

18
From the Common Core
  • To build a foundation for college and career
    readiness, students must read widely and deeply
    from among a broad range of high-quality,
    increasingly challenging literary and
    informational texts. . . By reading texts in
    history/social studies, science, and other
    disciplines, students build a foundation of
    knowledge in these fields that will also give
    them the background to be better readers in all
    content areas. Students can only gain this
    foundation when the curriculum is intentionally
    and coherently structured to develop rich content
    knowledge within and across grades. Students also
    acquire the habits of reading independently and
    closely, which are essential to their future
    success.

19
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20
An Example
Take a class ½ are good readers and ½ are poor
readers and give them a reading passage about
Baseball. Follow the reading up with an
assessment. Who will do better on the test?
The Poor Readers knew something about Baseball!
  • Good Readers
  • Poor Readers
  • Averaged
  • 27.5/40
  • Averaged
  • 18.8 /40

21
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22
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23
How is reading history/social studies different
from other types of reading?
  • History is interpretive.
  • History is an argument in favor of a particular
    narrative.
  • Who the author is matters. (sourcing)
  • The authors purpose matters. (bias and
    perspective)
  • A single text is problematic. (corroboration)

24
Different Operating System
Historical Reasoning
25
Structure of History Text
Who What When Where How Why
  • Someone
  • did something
  • at sometime
  • at some place
  • in some manner
  • for some reason.

26
Increasing Sophistication
5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by
planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying
a new approach.
  • 6th Grade
  • Grades 11-CCR
  • Production and Distribution of Writing
  • 5. With some guidance and support from peers and
    adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed
    by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or
    trying a new approach, focusing on how well
    purpose and audience have been addressed.
  • Production and Distribution of Writing
  • 5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by
    planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying
    a new approach, focusing on addressing what is
    most significant for a specific purpose and
    audience.

27
Writing Anchor Standards
  • Text Types and Purposes
  • 1. Write arguments to support claims in an
    analysis of substantive topics or texts, using
    valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient
    evidence.
  • 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine
    and convey complex ideas and information clearly
    and accurately through the effective selection,
    organization, and analysis of content.
  • 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined
    experiences or events using effective technique,
    well-chosen details, and well-structured event
    sequences.

28
Writing Anchor Standards
  • Production and Distribution of Writing
  • 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which
    the development, organization, and style are
    appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • 5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by
    planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying
    a new approach.
  • 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to
    produce and publish writing and to interact and
    collaborate with others.

29
Writing Anchor Standards
  • Research to Build and Present Knowledge
  • 7. Conduct short as well as more sustained
    research projects based on focused questions,
    demonstrating understanding of the subject under
    investigation.
  • 8. Gather relevant information from multiple
    print and digital sources, assess the credibility
    and accuracy of each source, and integrate the
    information while avoiding plagiarism.
  • 9. Draw evidence from literary or informational
    texts to support analysis, reflection, and
    research.

30
Writing Anchor Standards
  • Range of Writing
  • 10. Write routinely over extended time frames
    (time for research, reflection, and revision) and
    shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or
    two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and
    audiences.

31
How do we do this?
  • Collaborate with ELA teachers in your school
  • (Know what you dont know)
  • Students need a lot more writing practice.
  • Students need teachers who model good writing.
  • Students need many opportunities to read and
    study other writers.
  • Students need choice when it comes to writing
    topics.
  • Students need to write for authentic purposes and
    for authentic audiences.
  • Students need meaningful feedback from both the
    teacher and their peers.

32
Speaking/Listening Standards
  • Comprehension and Collaboration
  • SL.6.1. Engage effectively in a range of
    collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,
    and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6
    topics, texts, and issues, building on others
    ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • Come to discussions prepared, having read or
    studied required material explicitly draw on
    that preparation by referring to evidence on the
    topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on
    ideas under discussion.
  • Follow rules for collegial discussions, set
    specific goals and deadlines, and define
    individual roles as needed.
  • Pose and respond to specific questions with
    elaboration and detail by making comments that
    contribute to the topic, text, or issue under
    discussion.
  • Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate
    understanding of multiple perspectives through
    reflection and paraphrasing.

33
Speaking/Listening Standards
  • SL.6.2. Interpret information presented in
    diverse media and formats (e.g., visually,
    quantitatively, orally) and explain how it
    contributes to a topic, text, or issue under
    study.
  • SL.6.3. Delineate a speakers argument and
    specific claims, distinguishing claims that are
    supported by reasons and evidence from claims
    that are not.
  • Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
  • SL.6.4. Present claims and findings, sequencing
    ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions,
    facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or
    themes use appropriate eye contact, adequate
    volume, and clear pronunciation.
  • SL.6.5.. Include multimedia components (e.g.,
    graphics, images, music, sound) and visual
    displays in presentations to clarify information.
  • SL.6.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and
    tasks, demonstrating command of formal English
    when indicated or appropriate.

34
Don Gifford
  • Educational Program Consultant
  • KSDE
  • dgifford_at_ksde.org
  • (785) 296-3892
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