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Managing change in the senior secondary environment

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Title: Secondary School Leaders Forum Subject: Secondary School Leaders Forums Author: Queensland Studies Authority Last modified by: Queensland Studies Authority – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Managing change in the senior secondary environment


1
Managing change in the senior secondary
environment
  • Kathryn Tully, Acting Deputy Director, Curriculum
    Services Division

2
Current
Authority syllabuses (AC Qld) QCE
QCIA
Future
3
Senior secondary Australian Curriculum
  • Senior secondary Australian Curriculum (content
    and achievement standards) as the agreed and
    common base for the development of Queensland
    courses.
  • English
  • (Geography expected in July, 2013)

English Mathematics Science History Geography
Essential English Essential Mathematics Chemistry Modern History Geography
English General Mathematics Physics Ancient History
Literature Mathematical Methods Biology
English as an Additional Language or Dialect (EAL/D) Specialist Mathematics Earth and Environmental Science
4
(No Transcript)
5
The role of the QSA
  • Syllabus development and revision
  • Develop design briefs (guidelines for syllabus
    writers) for Queensland senior syllabuses using
    the senior secondary Australian Curriculum
    content and achievement standards as the agreed
    and common base
  • Resolve the status of Essential English and
    Essential Mathematics as Authority or
    Authority-registered subjects, and their
    respective relationship to English Communication
    and Pre-Vocational Mathematics
  • Develop implementation strategy

6
  • Principles for implementation strategy
  • Develop an implementation strategy that includes
  • trial before general implementation for new
    subjects
  • full year familiarisation with the revised
    syllabus before general implementation
  • refined approach to general implementation that
    uses aspects of a trial and includes face-to-face
    and online professional development.

7
  • Options for staged revision schedules
  • Group syllabuses for Queensland courses into
    three categories
  • new subjects
  • subjects where there are substantial differences
    from the current Queensland syllabus
  • subjects where there are minor differences from
    the current Queensland syllabus.

8
Work Studies Years 910
  • School based program that prepares students for
    industry
  • Focuses on
  • Vocational learning
  • Develop skills for work and further training
  • Consultation draft of the Australian Curriculum
    Work Studies Years 910 to be submitted to ACARA
    for approval on 5 September 2013

9
National Trade Cadetships Years 1112
  • School based program
  • Students complete industry endorsed vocational
    learning program, including work placement
  • Draft shape paper Australian Curriculum National
    Trade Cadetships Years 1112 v.1

10
Consultation
  • Learning Area Reference Committees
  • Governing Body Committees
  • Professional Associations
  • Principal Groups

11
Redevelopment of Study Area Specifications (SASs)
  • 40 of all senior students study at least one SAS
  • 14.2 of all senior students study four or more
    SASs

12
Subject area syllabus structure
Rationale
Dimensions and objectives
Course organisation
Assessment
Glossary
13
Factors underpinning subject area syllabuses
14
Factors underpinning subject area syllabuses
15
What are the Core Skills for Work?
  • Elements identified by employers
  • Non-technical skills and knowledge for successful
    participation in work
  • Skills that contribute to work performance in
    combination with technical/discipline specific
    skills and core language, literacy and numeracy
    skills
  • Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate
    Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education
    and Department of Education, Employment and
    Workplace Relations (2013)

16
What are the Core Skills for Work?
Cluster 1 Navigate the world of work Cluster 2 Interact with others Cluster 3 Get the work done
Manage career and work life Work with roles, rights and protocols Communicate for work Connect with work and others Recognise and utilise diverse perspectives Plan and organise Make decisions Identify and solve problems Create and innovate Work in a digital world
17
Factors underpinning subject area syllabuses
18
Public perception
Daily Telegraph, April 2013
The Advertiser, January 2013
The Australian, September 2012
School literacy and numeracy tests show little
improvement
Herald Sun, July 2011
Geoff Masters, 2012, ABC News
.. we have big challenges in Australia, not only
in maintaining our high performance and
continuing to improve, but particularly to
address the needs of disadvantages students
Courier Mail, April 2011
19
Group A General Implementation 2015
Learning Area Subject Area Syllabuses
Business and Economics Business in Practice
ICT and Design Information and Communication Technology Fashion
Health and Physical Education Recreation Early Childhood Hospitality
Humanities and Social Sciences Religion and Ethics Social and Community Studies
Science Agricultural and Horticultural Practices Marine and Aquatic Practices
20
Group B General Implementation 2016
Learning Area Subject Area Syllabuses
Arts Dance in Practice Drama in Practice Media Arts in Practice Music in Practice Multi-disciplinary Arts in Practice Visual Arts
Design and ICT Building and Construction Skills Engineering Skills Furnishing Skills Industrial Graphics Skills Industrial Technology Skills
Humanities and Social Sciences Tourism
Science Science in Practice
21
Creative Arts reconceptualised
Photo-imaging
22
Manufacturing reconceptualised
Aeroskills Studies
Automotive Studies
Plastics Studies
23
Redeveloped Tourism
Humanities and Social Science Learning Area


Business and Economics Learning Area
Tourism Study Area Specification
Tourism Subject Area Syllabus
  • Currently focuses on
  • The Tourism industry
  • Global Tourism
  • Tourism information
  • Tourism as a Business
  • Future focus
  • Social, environmental and economic aspects of
    tourism
  • Sustainable practices
  • Skills, e.g. technology, communication
    planning

24
How will these changes impact on my school?
What do I need to do to prepare my school for
change?
25
QCE Outcomes
  • In 2012,
  • 6206 students werent eligible at
  • the end of Year 12 to receive the QCE.
  • (Year 12 Cohort 48 205)

26
Literacy and/or numeracy requirement
  • How many students did not met the requirement...
  • Numeracy 188
  • Literacy 128
  • Numeracy and Literacy 8

27
Strategies
  • 1. Case manage students
  • 2. Build understanding of the ways to meet
    literacy and numeracy requirements
  • 3. Consider, is allocation of notional sound
    relevant

28
Literacy and numeracy requirements
  • Students are able to meet Queensland Certificate
    of Education literacy and numeracy requirements
    through
  • sound Achievement in one semester of a
    QSA-developed English and Mathematics subject
  • sound Achievement in QSA-developed short courses
    in literacy and numeracy
  • pass grade in a literacy and numeracy course
    recognised by the QSA
  • result of C on the Queensland Core Skills Test
  • result of 4 for an International Baccalaureate
    examination in English and Mathematics
  • completion of Certificate I in Core Skills for
    Employment and Training Communication
    (39282QLD) or Numeracy (39288QLD)

29
Notional sound
  • To meet the requirements for awarding a notional
    sound students must demonstrate
  • at least a Sound Level of Achievement in one
    semester of English, English Extension, English
    Communication or English for ESL Learners for
    literacy
  • at least a Sound Level of Achievement in one
    semester of Mathematics A, Mathematics B,
    Mathematics C or Prevocational Mathematics for
    numeracy.

30
How many students did not meet...
  • Completed core 219
  • 20 credits 2380 students
  • - 334 students had 19 credits
  • - 476 students had 18 credits

31
Some strategies.
  • Case manage and monitor all students, e.g. core
    requirements
  • Manage transfer students and subject changes to
    ensure completed core isnt compromised
  • Monitor curriculum, assessment and moderation
    processes

32
What is VET in Schools?
  • VET for school students provides a number of
    important functions within senior schooling
  • develops employability and other vocational
    skills
  • provides pathways to further education and
    training
  • delivers training which will provide skills for
    chosen vocation
  • engages students in learning
  • contributes towards VET qualifications
  • supports retention in the school system
  • contributes credit points towards a QCE

33
What industry is saying
  • Benefits of VET for school students are clear.
  • Concerns raised by industry include
  • a lack of consistency in targeted qualification
    levels and industry areas
  • a low-demand or inappropriate qualifications
  • an unclear delineation between varying students
    reasons for participation in VETiS
  • VETiS and other institutional programs do not
    always deliver industry standard work readiness
    skills and knowledge.

34
Options for VET in schools
  • Exploration
  • employment awareness and life-skills learning
    phase
  • taster programs to assist students make
    informed career choices
  • Education
  • preparation for employment through the delivery
    of employability skills
  • low level training package qualifications
    available in the soft industry areas ICT,
    arts, business

35
Options for VET in schools
  • Employment
  • delivery of occupational specific skills and
    knowledge to the technical standard required in a
    workplace through
  • a school-based apprenticeship or traineeship
  • an RTO using best practice workplace simulation
    techniques and appropriate workplace experience
    arrangements

36
VET in Schools
  • RTOs in schools should be committed to
  • quality VET training and assessment
  • quality pathway outcomes directly linked to
    industry.

37
Quality VET
  • Quality Assessment HR High Standards
  • Assessment cannot look just like school tests
  • HR teacher requirements industry experience
  • High standards compliance is minimal standard

38
QSAs role
  • QSA operates under a delegation from Australian
    Skills Quality Authority (ASQA)
  • support schools with resources
  • audit schools identify support cease
    registration

39
  • Authoritative information on VET comes from the
  • Department of Innovation (Commonwealth)
  • Australian Skills Quality Authority
  • Queensland Studies Authority
  • Department of Education, Training and Employment
  • Great Skills. Real Opportunities
  • Contact your sector Education Queensland,
    Queensland Catholic Education Commission and
    Independent Schools Queensland
  • The Commonwealth Parliament is yet to pass
    legislation on
  • The Unique Student Identifier (USI)
  • New standards for RTO

40
Key messages
  • The Principal, as CEO of your RTO, is accountable
    for the operations
  • Quality VET linked with industry engagement is
    critical for success
  • Research quality professional development
  • Contact QSA
  • Email ian.fyfe_at_qsa.qld.edu.au
  • Phone 3864 0354

41
Contact
  • Kathryn Tully
  • Acting Deputy Director
  • Curriculum Services Division
  • kathryn.tully_at_qsa.qld.edu.au
  • Phone 3864 0249
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