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University of Calgary Faculty of Social Work Strategic Planning 2001 Situation Assessment: The facts

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Title: University of Calgary Faculty of Social Work Strategic Planning 2001 Situation Assessment: The facts


1
University of CalgaryFaculty of Social
WorkStrategic Planning 2001Situation
Assessment The facts, trends and implications
related to the environment in which the Faculty
of Social Work operates(Preliminary)
  • February 5, 2001

2
Presentation Outline
  • Planning Process
  • Key Trends
  • Comparative Analysis
  • Learner Needs and Segmentation
  • SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities,
    Threats) Analysis
  • Strategic Issues
  • Next Steps

3
Objectives for February 5th
Planning Process
  • Synthesize and achieve a common understanding of
    the key trends and implications related to
  • external environment, University environment,
    internal Faculty environment
  • alternative providers (comparative analysis)
  • learner needs and segmentation
  • Identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and
    threats (SWOT Analysis).
  • Identify a limited number of strategic issues
    which need to be addressed.

4
Meeting Ground Rules
Planning Process
  • Stay focused and in process
  • One conversation at a time
  • Be succinct
  • Listen generously
  • Challenge ideas, not people
  • Encourage new ideas, build on ideas
  • Be positive and open
  • Observe time limits
  • Ensure that everyone gets heard

5
Planning can be represented by a series of steps
whereby the components are regularly reviewed
and updated.
PlanningProcess
Steps in the Process
Situation Assessment
Strategy Definition
Action!
Implementation Performance Monitoring
  • Desired Future Direction
  • Mission
  • Key Success Factors
  • Performance Indicators
  • Objectives and Tactics
  • Performance Targets
  • Measure Actual Performance and React to Results
  • Key Trends
  • Comparative Analysis
  • Learner Needs
  • SWOT
  • Strategic Issues

Feedback
Source Whats All This Mission / Vision Stuff,
Framework
6
Expectations of this Planning Effort
PlanningProcess
Develop a strategic plan and related planning
process that recognizes the fiscal environmental
and cultural realities of the Faculty. Integrate,
coordinate and appropriately sequence all related
planning initiatives currently underway within
the Faculty with a view to streamline
efforts. Develop recommendations regarding
workload and resource allocation that will inform
the critical decisions necessary over the
upcoming five years. Agree on delivery and
governance structures needed to move the Faculty
into the next five years. Faculty and staff feel
they have had opportunity to contribute in a
meaningful way.
Strategic Plan
Work Smart Not Hard
Resourcing Plan
5 Year Horizon
Faculty / Staff Buy-in
Sources Terms of Reference Faculty of Social
Work, 2000 FSW Budget and Planning Committee
7
FSW will develop its strategic direction and
action plan over a series of steps.
PlanningProcess
Strategic Planning Process and Schedule
Session
Feb 5
Feb 26
Apr 2
Apr 23
Mar 19
Dec 13
Confirm Plan
Agree on Action
Develop Strategy Elements
Evolve Preferred Strategic Direction
SynthesizeSituation Assessment
OrganizationalMeeting
Duration
4 hrs
4 hrs
4 hrs
4 hrs
4 hrs
1 3/4 hrs
Focus
Consolidate and synthesize external environment,
University and internal Faculty issues and
trends Identify key issues and implications
Evaluate strategy alternatives and evolve
preferred alternative
Confirm strategic plan and communication
requirements Confirm ongoing planning cycle
Identify action priorities Clarify governance
structure
Confirm work plan and schedule Describe and
assign tasks
Develop / confirm elements of the evolved
strategy alternative Confirm core organizing
principles
8
This planning effort will provide valuable input
to several ongoing initiatives.
PlanningProcess
Strategic Planning Process
Primary Inputs
  • Three Year Business Plans
  • FSW Retreat notes
  • Self Study Report to the Board of Accreditation
  • Fieldstone Advisory Brief
  • FSW Marketing Plan
  • Market Assessment
  • FSW Marketing and Communications Plan
  • U of C Institutional Positioning Overview of
    Process, Findings and Final Recommendations
  • U of C Situation Assessment
  • Canada West Foundation
  • Graduating Student Satisfaction Survey
  • FSW Student Needs Assessment
  • Individual faculty and staff interviews

Framework for
  • 3 year Business Plan (Feb. 28)
  • MSW Access Proposal (Mar 16)
  • Curriculum Redesign process (Jan 2002)
  • Work Plans (on hold)
  • Faculty Research Plan (Feb 15)
  • Summit on Social Work (May 3)

9
Presentation Outline
  • Planning Process
  • Key Trends
  • Comparative Analysis
  • Learner Needs and Segmentation
  • SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities,
    Threats) Analysis
  • Strategic Issues
  • Next Steps
  • External environment
  • University environment
  • Internal Faculty environment

10
Several key factors are driving and shaping the
strategic direction of the Faculty.
Key Trends
Legacy
Social Work Profession
Learner Needs
Macro Trends
Alternative Providers
Faculty of Social Work
Regional Social Trends
Research
Technology
Local Realities
Source FSW documents and interviews
11
Until FSW overcomes its legacy, the Faculty will
not achieve peak performance.
Key TrendsLegacy
DESIRED FUTURE
TODAY
  • Internally focused
  • Individual work
  • Isolation
  • Bureaucracy leading to stalemate
  • Fixed in the present
  • Crises management (reactive or opportunistic)
  • Individual based compensation and reward system
  • Curriculum change stalemates
  • Externally focused
  • Teamwork / Trust
  • Leadership
  • Accountability leading to action
  • Future oriented
  • Proactive, anticipatory, planful and timely
    decision-making, based on an agree-to strategic
    direction
  • Team based compensation and recognition system
  • Dynamic relevant curriculum

Source FSW documents and interviews
12
The Alberta College of Social Works position on
entry into the profession is lower than a degree.
Key TrendsSocial Work Profession
Implications for the Social Work Profession
job
  • Inconsistent quality (leading to loss of
    reputation)
  • Conflicting messages (leading to lack of cohesion
    and marketplace confusion)
  • Multiple standards
  • Tension caused by Diplomas (BSW requirement for
    MSW)

Opportunities
  • Province-wide strategy for social work
  • Exercise influence within ACSW

ACSW
FSW
2 years of college - diploma, which is sufficient
to get registered
Minimum 4 years of university which is sufficient
to get registered
Source FSW documents and interviews
13
Several key trends are profoundly impacting
society and the social service landscape.
Key TrendsMacro Trends
Macro Trends
Implications
  • Increasing globalization
  • Increased stratification between the have and
    have-nots
  • Increased individualism and loss of community
  • Shifting government responsibility
  • general fiscal restraint
  • community governance and delivery
  • new approaches to clients
  • market approaches to public policy
  • separation of funding and delivery
  • emphasis on outcomes and accountability
  • integration of services
  • Health care and social service restructuring
  • Aging society
  • aging senior management in social services (e.g.,
    60 of senior management will retire in the next
    5 years)

For the social work profession
  • Great demand for social work profession
  • Interdisciplinary approach to problem-solving
  • Funding squeeze
  • Need for advocacy
  • Other professions filling social work jobs
  • Workers moving from full-time to contract
  • Profession just beginning to understand
    implications of aging population

For the Faculty of Social Work
  • Recruitment / retention of faculty
  • Difficult to recruit students
  • Tuition increasing while social work wages are
    low
  • Faculty academic role in social policy formation
  • New faculty injecting energy

Sources Alternative Service Delivery Project,
Canada West Foundation, Number 1, Dec. 1998
Framework team analysis
14
Regional community trends support FSWs recent
communications research.
Key Trends Regional and Social Trends
Regional and Social Trends
Social Issues
Rating
  • Increasing digital divide
  • Increasing focus on personal short-term goals
    versus long-term societal good
  • Changing definition of community
  • Increasing family stress
  • Increasing public awareness of the importance of
    early childhood focus
  • Continuing devolution and privatization
  • Increasing need to shift scarce dollars from
    programs to basic operating costs
  • Increasing transition rate from social service
    jobs to higher paying jobs
  • Reinvesting in social services by Alberta
    government

Identified Issues
Frequency
  • Poverty 40
  • Homelessness 16
  • Youth and Children 14
  • Accessible Housing 8
  • Mental Health Concerns 6
  • Family Violence 6
  • Accessible Education 5
  • Prostitution / Child Sexual Abuse 5
  • Aboriginal 4
  • Diversity 4
  • Health Care and Health Issues 4
  • Crime 4
  • Aging 3
  • New Immigrants 2
  • Drug Abuse 1

Source McIntyre, Sue and Karen Jacob, Faculty of
Social Work, Market Assessment Final Report, Aug
2000
Source Framework team analysis
15
Several regional education trends present
implications for the Faculty.
Key TrendsRegional Trends
  • Enrollment in post-secondary education is
    expected to continue to increase as the number of
    young people in the Alberta population rises,
    and, assuming current trends continue, as more
    adults of all ages enroll in various types of
    higher education.
  • Adult education and life-long learning have taken
    on heightened importance in recent years.
  • Traditional social work jobs are being
    increasingly filled by non-social workers and
    other professions.
  • Increasingly, private sector organizations are
    providing education and training.
  • Number of non-resident institutions from other
    jurisdictions offer programs to Albertans within
    the province.
  • Alternate forms of delivery are increasingly
    being used to facilitate these efforts.
  • The role of educating certain types of
    professionals (scientists and engineers) is
    viewed to be increasingly critical for the
    development of a competitive economy.
  • Provincial government funding for post-secondary
    institutions is not a priority.
  • Colleges are seeking and achieving degree
    granting status.
  • Pressure to realize Campus Alberta.
  • Province providing envelop funding.

Implications
For the Faculty of Social Work
  • Local demand for specific, relevant programs
  • Application politics shifting
  • How to market social work as a meaningful
    profession?
  • Need to be strategic / innovative / creative /
    quick
  • Just beginning to think about life long learning
    options
  • Partnership opportunities with foundations
  • External partnerships with employers in
    curriculum development

Source Situation Assessment, University of
Calgary 1996 Interviews, Framework team analysis
16
Local realities will continue to shape and
strengthen the Facultys strategic direction
Key TrendsLocal Trends
Faculty of Social Work
Calgary
Alberta
  • Rule bound
  • Operating cash strapped
  • High access
  • Increasingly, envelope funding
  • High profile for medicine, engineering, science
    and management
  • Institutional focus on
  • internationalization
  • post-degree continuous learning
  • curriculum redesign
  • research intensification
  • Limited planning capacity
  • Ranks 14th in compensation
  • Largest proportion of residents with university
    education
  • Large, modern, entrepreneurial, urban environment
  • Majority of students and alumni live in local
    vicinity
  • Substantial business and technological centre
  • Young city with a relatively short tradition
  • International tourist destination
  • Strong arts community
  • One of the largest faculty in the country
  • Offers broad social work education vs. narrow
    specialized programs
  • Provincial mandate with multiple locations
  • Perceived disconnect from social services
    community
  • Relatively unknown in broader community
  • Some internationally recognized scholars
  • Current structure is divisional and not
    reflective of provincial scope
  • Large province with two major cities
  • Several smaller cities
  • Rural and remote communities
  • Includes Reserves and Metis settlements
  • Province-wide decentralization of childrens
    services
  • More BSW students outside of Calgary than on the
    main campus

Sources Situation Assessment, University of
Calgary 1996 interviews Framework team analysis
17
with a growing influence on the Facultys
ability to deliver on its provincial mandate.
Key TrendsLocal Trends
1999
Sept 2000
Jan 2001
Jan 2000
Access funding has profoundly impacted FSW
Calgary Edmonton Lethbridge
Calgary Edmonton Lethbridge
Calgary Edmonton Lethbridge
Calgary Edmonton Lethbridge
  • Workers in rural, remote and Aboriginal
    communities can complete a social work degree in
    or around their community
  • By implication, access changes the out-of-Calgary
    operations
  • Access is expected to continue to segment the
    program to meet specific learner needs

Grand Prairie High Level Hobbema Peace River Red
Deer Slave Lake Stand-off
Grand Prairie High Level Hobbema Peace
River Slave Lake Stand-off
Grand Prairie High Level Hobbema Peace River Red
Deer Slave Lake Stand-off
Medicine Hat ??
6 sites 73 students
7 sites 110 students
8 sites 131 students
x.7 91 FLEs
Access drives the need for a provincial-wide
curriculum while offering opportunity for local
adaptation.
18
FSW is experiencing a revitalization.
Key TrendsFaculty
Strategies Identified
Concerns Expressed
  • Teaching Evaluation to assess teaching for merit
    and promotion
  • Declining interest in teaching
  • Teaching development to improve the teaching /
    learning process
  • Continued high level of student dissatisfaction
  • Duplication of course content
  • Content does not provide enough depth or breadth
  • Lack of clarity regarding focus areas within the
    curriculum
  • Organizational Efforts to clarify Program
    Coordinators role and Student Services Office in
    quality education
  • Curriculum Conversations to improve curriculum
    coherence, integration and linkage
  • Need for a targeted approach
  • Structural Changes to address the different and
    competing needs of the student body
  • Perceived lack of timely decision-making and
    accountability

Sources Faculty of Social Work, Quality
Improvement Strategies Interviews Framework
team analysis
19
The University is poised for a significant shift
as it selects a new President.
Key TrendsLocal Trends
Institutional Issues
  • Pending senior leadership change
  • Operational issues (process improvement)
  • Technical issues
  • Human resources issues
  • Policy changes

What impact will the new President have on the
Faculty of Social Work?
20
Increasing capability and strategic application
of technology could significantly impact FSW.
Key TrendsTechnology
Implications
Allows for competition to enter FSWs traditional
monopolistic environment
Allows FSW to broaden its market reach
For the Faculty of Social Work
Escalating volume of information and its
mechanisms of delivery and presentation
Increasing diversity and complexity of hardware
and software
  • Need high-level faculty member responsibility for
    IT
  • Technology training required for faculty /
    students / staff
  • May impact student recruitment
  • Often one-time funding available for technology
  • Unresolved intellectual property issues
  • Economic issues for students

Increasing demand for computing and network
resources
Increasing demand for access by faculty, staff
and students, any place, any time
Competence with basic information technology is
an expectation of potential employers and students
Governments will continue to see technology as
critical to education and will make funds
available to drive its use
Top-ranked scholars rely on technology to keep
them current and competitive
Quality of technology is important for attracting
and retaining students and scholarly talent
Sources Situation Assessment, University of
Calgary 1996 Framework team analysis Interview
21
Levels of research funding have been analyzed as
part of an institutional assessment of
university research strength.
Key TrendsResearch
million
.03
.13
.15
.20
.25
.35
.93
1.2
1.9
2.0
2.0
2.95
3.85
18.0
18.4
64.0
Sources Situation Assessment in Research
Programs, University of Calgary 2000 Framework
team analysis
22
FSW balances granting council research and
contract research with and for our communities.
Key TrendsResearch
Dual Research Aim
Recognition from the University
vs.
Impact on our Communities
  • Social work teaching and field education
  • Suicide prevention and evaluations
  • International social work with a concentration on
    the Middle East
  • Child welfare
  • Evaluation of social services programs
  • Youth justice
  • Aging
  • Multiculturalism

Grassroots, community-based migrates to national
Source A Profile of Faculty Research
Productivity, FSW, March 1999.
23
The Research Centre will elevate and coordinate
FSWs research efforts.
Key TrendsResearch
Social Work Research Centre
To promote and support excellence in social
welfare and social work research and development,
throughout Alberta, as well as at national and
international levels.
  • Our goal for the development of research in the
    professions is to significantly increase
    collaborative and multi-disciplinary work both
    within the professional disciplines and between
    the professions and other disciplines.
  • Areas of Specialization
  • Aboriginal communities
  • Child welfare
  • Gerontology
  • Diversity (including cultural, sexual
    orientation, disability)
  • Social policy
  • International development
  • Mental health
  • Poverty and homelessness
  • Immigrants and refugees
  • Social work education

Source K.A. Archer, Interim Vice-President
Research, Sept. 2000
24
FSW has been one of the largest and most
productive Faculties of social work in Canada.
Key TrendsResearch
Topic Areas Most Represented by Publications
1985 - 95
1996 - 97
Source A Profile of Faculty Research
Productivity FSW, March 1999
25
Presentation Outline
  • Planning Process
  • Key Trends
  • Comparative Analysis
  • Learner Needs and Segmentation
  • SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities,
    Threats) Analysis
  • Strategic Issues
  • Next Steps

26
Alternative providers are beginning to enter the
Facultys historical marketplace.
Comparative Analysis
Aspects of Cooptition
  • Internal competition for resources and students
  • Serious competition for faculty nation-wide
  • Competition for students
  • Undergraduate level
  • University of Victoria
  • Dalhousie
  • Graduate level
  • Ontario universities
  • Dalhousie
  • Graduate counseling degrees
  • Gonzaga
  • Athabasca
  • Doctoral level
  • Ontario universities
  • U.S. universities
  • Memorial

The U of C does not face provincial competition
for the BSW, MSW and Ph.D
27
Alternative providers can be classified
according to the perceived strategy they are
pursuing.
Comparative Analysis
  • Focus is on research
  • Significant funding received for research
  • Emphasis on Masters, Ph.D. and post-doctoral
    teaching

Research Dominant
  • Small to medium-sized, personable institutions
    which work towards helping students
  • Connected to the community through professional
    development and continuing education

Community Oriented
  • Main role is to provide students with job
    training in a specialized field
  • Students attracted by a job guarantee
  • Narrow focus

Job Training Centres
  • Typically older institutions defined by tradition
    and legacy
  • Active, reputable and well-connected alumni base
  • Strategy is to be the leader in learning
  • International scope

Brand Name
  • Institutions with flexible course offerings
  • Primarily serves part-time adult learnings
  • Aggressive target marketing

Convenience Educators
  • A limited number of themes
  • High focused

Specialty Focused
Source Situation Assessment, University of
Calgary, 1996.
28
The FSW competes in two segments of the market.
Comparative Analysis
Sources Coordination Task Force, University of
Calgary, August 1996 Interviews Framework team
analysis
29
Comparative Analysis and Market Positioning.
Comparative Analysis
Distinguishing Characteristics
Areas of Competition
  • Graduate
  • Doctoral

University of Toronto
  • High recognition / high rating
  • No undergraduate program
  • More concentrated at graduate level
  • Successful at securing federal research grants
    (SSHRC)
  • Undergraduate
  • Flexible delivery on campus and distance
    delivery with local field work
  • Concentrations in child welfare and First Nations

University of Victoria
  • Emerging competition for Undergraduate and
    Graduate
  • Offers BSW / MSW online

Dalhousie
  • Graduate
  • Doctoral
  • High quality education program and research
    capabilities
  • Undergraduate / graduate / doctoral levels

Wilfrid Laurier (WLU)
  • ??
  • ??
  • ??
  • ??

McGill
MRC
  • Undergraduate
  • Quick route into practice
  • Student-centred reputation
  • Less expensive
  • Small class size

Faculty of Social Work
  • Undergraduate
  • Graduate
  • Doctoral
  • Only degree granting social work program in
    Alberta
  • Multiple campuses provides wide access
  • Facilities among best in country
  • One of the most prolific Faculties for social
    work research

Source Interviews web-site analysis Framework
team analysis
30
An analysis of the programs and services offered
by our key competitors highlights opportunities
for FSW.
Comparative Analysis
Area of strategic focus Secondary area
Alter-native Delivery / Dist. Learning
Under-graduate
Program Marketing
Scholarly Talent
Post-degree Learning
Post-Diploma
Scholarly Activity
Service
Fellowship
Doctoral
Graduate
U of T
U.Vic
Dalhousie
Wilfrid Laurier (WLU)
McGill
Faculty of Social Work
Source Interviews marketing materials review
Framework team analysis
31
Comparative analysis helps to identify key
opportunities and threats.
Comparative Analysis
Opportunities
Threats
  • Province-wide mandate can dilute focus
  • Serving too many constituents / categories
  • Competition from colleges
  • Research and scholarship
  • Post-degree learning
  • Alliances with current competitor (colleges)

Source ?
32
Presentation Outline
  • Planning Process
  • Key Trends
  • Comparative Analysis
  • Learner Needs and Segmentation
  • SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities,
    Threats) Analysis
  • Strategic Issues
  • Next Steps

33
Effective planning identifies and anticipates
what learners need.
SegmentationTutorial
  • Helps keep curriculum and services relevant by
  • defining needs of specific learner groups
  • designing services or products to meet these
    needs
  • deciding how best to deliver these services or
    products

Learners are not all alike
Source The Power of Marketing, Framework
34
Segmentation divides a market into groups of
people who perceive and respond in similar ways.
SegmentationTutorial
Segmentation can be used to better understand any
group
Circles represent the constituencies with the
same set of needs
Shaded circles represent the constituencies that
the organization can best serve
Shaded circle represents the constituencies
currently being served by the organization
Source The Power of Marketing, Framework
35
A number of different parameters can be used to
segment learners.
SegmentationTutorial
Traditional e.g. full-time / part-time,
Faculty, program
More powerful in defining sub-segments and
setting tactics
Demographic e.g. geographic, gender, scholastic
achievement
More valuable in setting strategy and developing
processes
Needs-(Benefits) Based e.g. the primary
motivation for seeking a social work degree
Source The Power of Marketing, Framework
36
Segmentation provides insight for an organization
to focus its resources in order to distinguish
itself.
SegmentationTutorial
Benefits of Segmentation
  • Helps an organization focus energy on the parts
    of the environment they can serve most
    effectively.
  • Identifies needs and opportunities in the
    environment that are not currently being
    addressed.
  • Guides design and development of services and
    products to meet specific needs.
  • Provides understanding of variations and changes
    in the requirements and characteristics of the
    environment.
  • Focuses external communication efforts to
    maximize impact on selected segments.

Source The Power of Marketing, Framework
37
Several criteria are used to select target
segments.
SegmentationTutorial
  • Select those segments of the environment you can
    best satisfy based on
  • segment size
  • expected growth
  • competitors in the segment
  • cost of reaching the segment(s)
  • your key strengths and weaknesses

Source The Power of Marketing, Framework
38
For example, undergraduate needsdistinguish each
segment.
Learner Assessment
Source Creating Organizational Excellence
Research Unit, U of C, 97
39
Effective positioning of your service or product
meets the following criteria.
SegmentationTutorial
Positioning Criteria
?
  • Does it offer a benefit my target audience really
    wants?
  • Is it a real honest-to-goodness need?
  • Does it truly separate my product from others?
  • Is it unique and / or difficult to copy?

?
?
?
Source The Power of Marketing, Framework
40
The Facultys traditional way of classifying
students may not be providing enough information
...
Learner Assessment
... to develop the Facultys focus, in order to
capitalize on current capabilities, prioritize
areas for improvement, and market effectively.
Traditional Classification Method
One size fits all
41
At the Faculty level, recent student satisfaction
research identified three distinct student
segments entering the BSW
Learner Assessment
Characteristics
After Degree Learners
Diploma Learners
University Entrance Learners
  • Often have another degree e.g., Psychology,
    Sociology.
  • Often more mature and have made a conscious
    choice to pursue the field of Social Work after
    having worked post completion of first degree.
  • Have high expectations of the type of learning
    that will occur within the Social Work Faculty,
    somewhat influenced by their undergraduate
    degree.
  • Often have developed an interest in a specific
    area of social work e.g., community development,
    counselling.
  • Graduates of Diploma of Social Work programs who
    have already obtained a base of knowledge heavily
    rooted in a practical hands-on approach to the
    discipline.
  • Looking for teaching and curriculum that will
    advance their learning beyond the college level.
  • Seem to have taken time off between diploma and
    degree. Similar to after degree learners, makes
    them more mature and a group that has higher
    expectations from the degree.
  • Learners who take two years of undergraduate work
    in a variety of faculties in order to meet the
    entrance requirements into the faculty.
  • These learners tend to be younger.
  • In general, they also seem to have a lower level
    of expectation regarding the type of teaching and
    curriculum they expect of the Faculty.

Source Student Satisfaction Research, FSW 2000
42
each with a distinct set of needs.
Learner Assessment
Needs
After Degree Learners
Diploma Learners
University Entrance Learners
  • Professors / instructors who are leading edge in
    the social work field.
  • Faculty curriculum that supports specific areas
    of interest.
  • Clear link between theory and practical
    application of social work concepts.
  • Connections between the Faculty and agencies
    within the community.
  • Highly reputable program as these learners often
    pursue Masters degrees.
  • Professors / instructors who are leading edge in
    the social work field.
  • Faculty curriculum that supports specific areas
    of interest.
  • Clear link between theory and practical
    application of social work concepts.
  • Connections between the Faculty and agencies
    within the community.
  • Credible program that will translate into a job
    at the end of the degree.
  • Set of transferable skills that will equip them
    to successfully enter the field of social work.
  • Need to build on the social science base in their
    first two years.

Source Student Satisfaction Research, FSW 2000
43
Further subsegmentation complicates FSWs
ability to deliver on learner needs.
Learner Assessment
After Degree Learners
University Entrance Learners
Implications for
Diploma Learners
  • Curriculum
  • Simplify curriculum
  • Coherent course flow
  • Consistent curriculum
  • Targeted
  • Do not belong in BSW
  • 2 year Masters program
  • Access
  • Access
  • Limited impact

Rural
  • Recruitment
  • 2nd year access for university entrance learners
  • Aggressive recruiting
  • Do not belong in BSW
  • 2 year Masters program
  • Access
  • Broker to colleges, or
  • Split BSW with site-based program for college
    grads
  • Urban Access
  • Aggressive recruitment
  • Direct entry in second year

Urban
  • Student Satisfaction
  • Tailored programs
  • Strong teachers up front
  • Planful program delivery
  • Do not belong in BSW
  • 2 year Masters program
  • Access
  • Access
  • Limited impact
  • Program Delivery Mechanisms
  • Access
  • Brokering to colleges
  • Accountability

Aboriginal
Source FSW Faculty Interviews
44
We know the characteristics of a student
typically recruited to the Faculty.
Learner Assessment
Target Markets for Recruitment
Learner Characteristics
  • BSW Transfer and third year admits workers in
    social service settings without a professional
    degree.
  • MSW / PhD Workers in social service settings
    with a BSW. Spans age range from 20s to 50s
    generally people have quite a bit of experience
    in the field.
  • In all cases the demographics include all
    cultural and ethnic groups, in both the urban and
    rural areas.
  • Female
  • A caring individual
  • Feel they can make a difference
  • Social, has fun and is enthusiastic
  • Either a student in the Communication and Culture
    program at the U of C or enrolled in a college
    diploma program
  • After-degree
  • Interests
  • getting ahead
  • making more of a difference to people / society
  • more interesting jobs
  • more money

Source Creative Brief, Student Recruitment,
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary.
Source Fieldstone Advertising Brief, January
2000.
45
Several primary influencers affect the quality
and composition of FSWs student body.
Learner Assessment
Primary Influencers
Secondary Influencers
  • Recruitment Audience
  • Prospective BSW Students for the Calgary,
    Edmonton and Lethbridge campuses
  • Student enrollment influences including parents,
    campus counselors, etc.
  • Post-degree professionals
  • Internal Audience U of C senior administrators
    and faculty
  • Alumni
  • Industry Regional Health Authorities, Child
    Welfare administrators, Accreditation Body, ACSW
    (Alberta College of Social Workers)
  • U of C Campus community
  • Faculty of Social Work at other universities
  • Potential faculty members
  • International social workers
  • Media

Source Faculty of Social Work, Marketing
Communications Plan, August 19,1999.
46
Intuitively, we know that our students are
primarily from Calgary.
Learner Assessment
Learners come from
Learners come from
Saskatchewan Maritimes Calgary
Calgary (Alberta) International across Canada
B S W / M S W
Ph.D
Graduates go to
Graduates go to
Local Maritimes (home)
Local U.S.
47
Student Enrollment Statistics
Learner Assessment
A shift may be occurring from the traditional
programs to Access.
1996 - 2000
Source FSW
48
U of Cs perception of FSW performance is not
positive.
Learner Assessment
BSW Student Satisfaction Survey
Percentage of 4 and 5 or yes responses
Source Excerpts from Student Satisfaction
Survey, 1999.
49
U of Cs perception of FSW performance is not
positive.
Learner Assessment
MSW Student Satisfaction Survey
Percentage of 4 and 5 or yes responses
Source Analysis of Student Satisfaction Data, U
of C, 2000
50
Presentation Outline
  • Planning Process
  • Key Trends
  • Comparative Analysis
  • Learner Needs and Segmentation
  • SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities,
    Threats) Analysis
  • Strategic Issues
  • Next Steps

51
A SWOT analysis is a framework used to synthesize
the positive and negative elements of an
organization and its environment.
SWOT Analysis

SWOT Analysis
  • Strengths
  • Weaknesses

Key Strategic Issues and Implications
  • Opportunities
  • Threats

Source A Practical Guide for Strategic Planning
in Social Service Organizations
52
Key strengths distinguish the Facultyfrom all
other providers.
SWOT Analysis
  • Strengths
  • Only degree granting social work program in
    Alberta
  • Multiple campus structure provides wide access
  • Facilities among the best in the country
  • Strong leadership
  • Faculty appears to be a government priority
  • High percent of students get jobs
  • One of the most prolific Faculties for social
    work research

Source FSW Budget and Planning Committee
Framework team analysis
53
The Faculty may need to direct additional
resources to overcome gaps.
SWOT Analysis
  • Weaknesses
  • Not considered gate-keepers of the profession
  • Vaguely known by the foundations, private donors
    and politicians (community disconnect)
  • Not enough practical skills learned by students
    as perceived by some students and employers
  • Little known in the corporate sector,
    foundations, private donors or politicians
  • An introvert approach to marketing
  • Lack of understanding of social work profession
    in general
  • A negative history of the Faculty still in the
    minds of faculty, some alumni and students

Source FSW Budget and Planning Committee
Framework team analysis
54
The Faculty may choose to capitalize on one or
more opportunities.
SWOT Analysis
Opportunities
  • Influence public policy
  • Increase awareness of, and enhance its leadership
    position within, the human services community of
    Alberta
  • Students get jobs and good ones!
  • Leverage the Facultys present relationship with
    government into a long-term priority position
    that
  • Has the government recommit its ACCESS funding
  • Turns ACCESS funding into Base funding
  • Create a strong position and reputation both
    nationally and internationally as a respected
    leader in social work education and research
  • Jointly market, when appropriate with the
    Professional association(s).
  • The Faculty can position itself as the sole
    educator in the province offering BSW, MSW, and
    PhD.
  • Become a leader in post-degree learning.

Source FSW Budget and Planning Committee
Framework team analysis
55
Threats emerge from many sources
SWOT Analysis
Threats
  • Programs offered by schools outside of Alberta
    inside Alberta as well as online learning
  • Increasing attitude toward de-professionalizing
    the profession
  • Increasing corporate non-profit training1
  • Alternative programs competition for students
    and faculty
  • Declining interest in choosing social work
  • Unrealistic demands from graduates
  • Accreditation policies
  • Human service professionals vs. social workers
    loss of boundaries

1 William Ryan, The New Landscape for
Non-profits, Harvard Business Review,
January-February 1999
Source FSW Budget and Planning Committee
Framework team analysis
56
Presentation Outline
  • Planning Process
  • Key Trends
  • Comparative Analysis
  • Learner Needs and Segmentation
  • SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities,
    Threats) Analysis
  • Strategic Issues
  • Next Steps

57
Several strategic issues will define FSWs
action priorities.
StrategicIssues
Faculty of Social Works Strategic Issues
Strategic Issues
  • Curriculum to meet the needs of learners and the
    profession
  • Deployment of human resources (workload,
    governance)
  • Faculty image and leadership positioning
  • Research strength and reputation
  • How to capture the post-degree continuous
    learning opportunity

A trend, event or factor, either internal or
external, that will likely result in change
within the time frame of the plan.
Source Interviews Framework team analysis
58
Presentation Outline
  • Planning Process
  • Key Trends
  • Comparative Analysis
  • Learner Needs and Segmentation
  • SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities,
    Threats) Analysis
  • Strategic Issues
  • Next Steps

59
Our next step will focus on articulating FSWs
strategic direction.
Next Steps
Strategic Planning Process and Schedule
Session
Feb 5
Feb 26
Apr 2
Apr 23
Mar 19
Dec 13
Confirm Plan
Agree on Action
Develop Strategy Elements
Evolve Preferred Strategic Direction
SynthesizeSituation Assessment
OrganizationalMeeting
Duration
4 hrs
4 hrs
4 hrs
4 hrs
4 hrs
1 3/4 hrs
Focus
Consolidate and synthesize external environment,
University and internal Faculty issues and
trends Identify key issues and implications
Evaluate strategy alternatives and evolve
preferred alternative
Confirm strategic plan and communication
requirements Confirm ongoing planning cycle
Identify action priorities Clarify governance
structure
Confirm work plan and schedule Describe and
assign tasks
Develop / confirm elements of the evolved
strategy alternative Confirm core organizing
principles
60
FSWs action priorities need to address the
Facultys strategic direction and strategic
issues.
Next Steps
Action Priorities Actions Priorities are the
specific objectives or milestones and associated
tasks required to address the strategic issues
and implement the mission.
Growth Strategy As described by FSWs desired
future direction
Strategic Issues Outcome of the Situation
Assessment
Source Whats All This Mission / Vision
Stuff, Framework
61
Assessment of our February 5th planning meeting.
What We Need to do Better
What Went Well
  • Get away from our history
  • Good, clear capture of the issues
  • Moved well and quickly with opportunity for
    discussion
  • Opportunity for individual input
  • Need to talk about communication to the rest of
    the faculty
  • All Divisions are not represented here today
  • Should we have an external community person
    involved to affirm presence and objectively look
    at our strategic direction
  • How do we ensure faculty buy-in? (this work
    represents a significant cultural shift for us).
  • Place this document on the website once it is
    finalized.
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