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ACSM American Fitness Index™ Actively Moving America to Better Health

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ACSM American Fitness Index Actively Moving America to Better Health A program of the American College of Sports Medicine (ASCM) Presentation by First Last, Ph.D ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: ACSM American Fitness Index™ Actively Moving America to Better Health


1
ACSM American Fitness Index Actively Moving
America to Better Health
  • A program of the American College of Sports
    Medicine (ASCM) Presentation by First Last, Ph.D,
    FACSM
  • Mo/Da/2009

2
ACSM American Fitness Index
  • Funded by the WellPoint Foundation
  • Looks at health status of population
  • Preventive health behaviors
  • Levels of chronic disease conditions
  • Access to health care
  • Looks at community assets that support healthy
    lifestyles
  • Community supports
  • Policies for physical activity

3
Need for Action
  • Physical activity and obesity are at epidemic
    proportions
  • Increased prevalence of chronic diseases
  • Increasing health expenditures
  • Regular physical activity
  • Therapeutic physical benefits
  • Fewer health care needs
  • Combats rising health care expenditures

4
Need for Action
  • ACSM-commissioned 2007 Omnibus survey
  • Solution to decreasing physical activity and
    obesity lies at the local level
  • Highlights
  • 72 rated communitys efforts to encourage
    physical activity as average or worse
  • 49 say lack of biking tails and 27 say lack of
    public parks hinders physical activity
  • 94 acknowledged physical activity is key for
    disease prevention

5
What Makes the AFI Unique?
  • Many may ask, Why do we need another study to
    tell us to get more active?
  • Need an effective measure that captures
  • The state of health
  • The state of community fitness
  • Measure at the local level
  • Scientific- and evidence-based measure

6
Advisory Board
  • Chair Walter R. Thompson, Ph.D. FACSM (Georgia
    State University)
  • Vice-chair Barbara Ainsworth, Ph.D.
    FASCM (Arizona State University)
  • Steven N. Blair, P.E.D., FACSM (University of
    South Carolina)
  • Ralph Bovard, M.D., MPH, FACSM (HealthPartners
    Specialty Center)
  • Jacqueline Epping, M.Ed. (U.S. Centers for
    Disease Control Prevention)
  • John M. Jakicic, Ph.D., FACSM (University of
    Pittsburgh)

7
Advisory Board (contd)
  • Elizabeth Joy, M.D., MPH, FACSM (University of
    Utah)
  • NiCole Keith, Ph.D. FACSM (Indiana University
    Purdue University-Indianapolis)
  • Roseann M. Lyle, Ph.D. FACSM (Purdue University)
  • Melinda M. Manore, Ph.D, R.D., FACSM (Oregon
    State University)
  • Angela Smith, M.D., FACSM (Childrens Hospital of
    Philadelphia)
  • Stella Lucia Volpe, Ph.D., R.D. FACSM (University
    of Pennsylvania)
  • Wes Wong, M.D., M.M.M (Anthem Blue Cross Blue
    Shield-WellPoint)

8
AFI Program Goal
  • Improve the health, fitness and quality of life
    of Americans by promoting physical activity.

9
AFI Program Components
  • 1 - Data
  • Collect, aggregate and report metropolitan area
    data
  • Data related to
  • Healthy lifestyles
  • Health outcomes
  • Community resources
  • Execute AFI data report
  • Scientific- and evidence-based snapshot of the
    health status of major metro areas

10
AFI Program Components
  • 2 - Resources
  • Resources for practical application of sports
    medicine and exercise science
  • Conduct research
  • Provide education

11
AFI Program Components
  • 3 - Health Promotion Partners
  • Link communities with organizations and existing
    programs in their metro area
  • Promote collaboration on physical activity and
    healthy lifestyle initiative
  • Connect local, state and national partners and
    resources

12
Implementation (Pilot)
  • Pilot phase focused on data collection and
    analysis (released May 2008)
  • Download at AmericanFitnessIndex.org
  • 16 of the most populous U.S. metro areas
  • Top 15 Indianapolis
  • Based on MSA data from U.S. Census
  • Data collected, analyzed, weighted and aggregated

13
Implementation (Expansion)
  • The next phase focused on expanding the data
    report to the top 50 most populous U.S. metro
    areas
  • Download at AmericanFitnessIndex.org
  • Includes some newly available data

14
Methodology
  • AFI uses scientific evidence, expert opinion and
    statistical methodologies to select, weigh and
    combine the elements used in the data report.

15
Methodology
  • Metro Areas Included
  • Not city limits only
  • Overlooks interaction of core city and
    surrounding suburban areas
  • Shared fitness-related resources

16
Top 50 Metro Areas
  • Atlanta
  • Austin
  • Baltimore
  • Birmingham
  • Boston
  • Buffalo
  • Charlotte
  • Chicago
  • Cincinnati
  • Cleveland
  • Columbus, OH
  • Dallas
  • Denver
  • Detroit
  • Hartford
  • Houston
  • Indianapolis
  • Jacksonville
  • Kansas City
  • Los Angeles
  • Louisville
  • Memphis

17
Top 50 Metro Areas
  • Miami
  • Milwaukee
  • Minneapolis/St. Paul
  • Nashville
  • New York
  • Oklahoma City
  • Orlando
  • Philadelphia
  • Phoenix
  • Pittsburgh
  • Portland, OR
  • Providence, RI
  • Raleigh, NC
  • Richmond, VA
  • Riverside, CA
  • Rochester, NY
  • Sacremento
  • St. Louis
  • Salt Lake City
  • San Antonio
  • San Francisco
  • San Jose
  • Seattle
  • Tampa
  • Virginia Beach
  • Washington, D.C.

18
Metro Area Breakdown
  • Example
  • Atlanta
  • AFI rank (5) AFI Score (285)
  • Population rank (9)
  • MSA Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta
  • Nickname Metro Atlanta

19
Indicators Selected for AFI
  • Must be related to the level of health status
    and/or physical activity
  • Must be recently measured and reported by a
    well-respected agency or organization of the
    metro area
  • Must be modifiable through community efforts
  • Example smoking rate

20
Data sources and information
  • Info gleaned from publicly available federal
    reports and past studies
  • Must be recent data with established history
  • Most data is from 2006

21
Data sources and information
  • SMART BRFSS
  • American Community Survey (by Trust for Public
    Land)
  • U.S. Census
  • U.S. Dept of Agriculture
  • State Report Cards
  • HRSA Area Resource File

22
Data on Personal Health
  • Health Behaviors
  • exercising in last 30 days
  • exercising at least moderately
  • eating 5 fruit/veggies per day
  • currently smoking

23
Data on Personal Health
  • Chronic Health Problems
  • obese
  • in excellent or very good health
  • with asthma
  • with diabetes
  • Death rate/100,000 for CV disease
  • Death rate/100,000 for diabetes

24
Data on Personal Health
  • Health Care
  • with health insurance

25
Data - Community/Environment
  • Built Environment
  • Parkland as of MSA land area
  • Acres of parkland/1,000
  • Farmers Markets/1,000,000
  • /10,000 using public transit to work
  • /10,000 biking or walking to work

26
Data - Community/Environment
  • Recreational Facilities
  • Ball diamonds/10,000
  • Dog parks/10,000
  • Park playgrounds/10,000
  • Golf courses/100,000
  • Park units/10,000
  • Recreation centers/20,000
  • Swimming pools/100,000
  • Tennis Courts/10,000

27
Data - Community/Environment
  • Park-related expenditures per capita
  • Level of State requirement for PE classes

28
Data - Health Care Providers
  • of primary care providers/100,000

29
Data Limitations
  • Based on self-reported responses
  • Some missing data for some indicators in some
    MSAs
  • Example Riverside community and environmental
    indicators

30
Guiding Principles for Healthy Communities
  • Overall health improvement in U.S. communities
    must focus on the prevention of behavioral-linked
    diseases by effectively addressing the underlying
    risk and community factors
  • The rise in chronic diseases attributable to
    physical inactivity and unhealthy diets are a
    clear and present danger to our health and
    healthcare systems, our communities, our nation
    and our future

31
Guiding Principles for Healthy Communities
(contd)
  • All U.S. communities, irrespective of size and
    current health status, can make powerful advances
    in improving the health of their people through
    simple, affordable, effective steps.
  • There is a need for even more synergy and
    collaboration to assist U.S. communities in
    actively making the moves toward better health

32
Moving from pilot to full version
  • Expanded and enhanced
  • Expanded to the Top 50 MSAs
  • Use combined MSAs for communities with MSA
    divisions
  • Expand data elements from BRFSS
  • Obtain info about certified personal trainers
  • Update elements

33
Next Steps
  • May 2009 data report
  • Released during ACSM Annual Meeting (Seattle,
    Wash.)
  • Welcome suggestions and comments
  • Send comments to afi_at_acsm.org

34
What can you do?
  • Provide comments/suggestions
  • Be a role model for good health and physical
    activity
  • Educate and bring awareness to the physical
    inactivity epidemic in your community
  • Media relations
  • Engage community leaders
  • Volunteer
  • Check out www.americanfitnessindex.org for local
    resources

35
Thank you
  • Questions?
  • www.AmericanFitnessIndex.org
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