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Mathematics and the Developing Countries: Mathematics in Africa

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Mathematics and the Developing Countries: Mathematics in Africa Andreas Griewank Gareth Witten Humboldt Universit t Berlin, CDC_at_IMU University of Cape Town , SA – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Mathematics and the Developing Countries: Mathematics in Africa


1
Mathematics and the Developing CountriesMathemat
ics in Africa
  • Andreas Griewank Gareth Witten
  • Humboldt Universität Berlin, CDC_at_IMU University
    of Cape Town , SA
  • Laure Pauline Fotso Mohamed Jaoua
  • University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon Nice/Tunisia
  • Wandera Ogana Bernard Philippe 
  • University of Nairobi, Kenya INRIA Rennes
  • Leif Abrahamsson  TSOU Sheung Tsun
  • Uppsala University , Sweden Oxford University,
    CDC_at_ EMS

Roundtable_at_5ECM, Amsterdam
1
2
Challenges with the development of advanced
Centres of Excellence Gareth Witten, University
of Cape Town , SA
  • Mathematics and science are key priorities
  • Research Chairs - 21 scientists in different
    fields. The aim is to create 56 research chairs
    by 2008, and 210 by 2010.
  • Several Centres of Excellence - increase in the
    applications of mathematics
  • Increase in graduates from mathematics
    departments due to new postgraduate courses in
    modern applied mathematics programmes, e.g.
    mathematical finance, mathematical biology.

3
Challenges with the development of advanced
Centres of Excellence Gareth Witten, University
of Cape Town , SA
  • A Student's perspective
  • - Lack of career path
  • - Affirmative action
  • - Economics
  • - Outdated curricula
  • Institutional Perspective
  • - lack of collaboration and healthy competition
  • - lack of motivation due to poor remuneration
  • Remedies
  • - Mutual support network
  • - Improved TL in institutions
  • - Establish link between industry and ed.
    Institutions
  • - improve standards of ed. through peer-review
    process
  • - Encourage involvement of the African Diaspora

4
5ECM 14 - 18 July 2008Amsterdam RAI, The
Netherlands
  • Mathematics and Developing Countries Round
    TableCase of Mathematics in Cameroon

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
4
5
Plan
  • Introduction
  • Status Quo of mathematics in statistical terms
  • Challenges with the Development of advanced
    centres of Excellences
  • Barriers
  • Remedies

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
5
6
Introduction
  • Focus on the two topics
  • Status Quo of mathematics in statistical terms
    and Challenges with the Development of advanced
    centres of Excellences.
  • With regard topic 1
  • Information on FS of UYI where is the mother
    Department of Mathematics in Cameroon.
  • Projection on Department of Mathematics
  • Statistics on departments of mathematics of
    Cameroonian universities.
  • Concerning topics 2
  • barriers (political, economical and cultural)
  • remedies
  • Twining of departments
  • Strategies to persuade African governments to
    support the development of mathematics

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
6
7
Status Quo in statistical terms Facts on FS of
UYI
  • Human resources
  • Ratio teacher/students 1/53 in 2007.
  • 240 teachers (28 full Prof., 38 Ass. Prof. 139
    Lecturers, 35 assistant lecturers)
  • Infrastructures and equipment
  • classrooms capacity 3200 seats,
  • one main University library capacity 200 seats,
  • 80 computers (60 for students and 20 for
    teachers)
  • Teaching load
  • to cover 80 of the program, 102491 hours are
    needed with 17 for lectures, 44 for tutorials
    39 for practical lessons.
  • Only 37 of these hours can be covered on normal
    duty ?need of 63 of over time from teachers

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
7
8
Status Quo in statistical terms Facts on FS of
UYI
  • The teaching overload heavily and negatively
    affects the quality of
  • Teaching
  • Thesis supervision or direction and
  • Research.
  • Teaching conditions Use of old teaching
    techniques
  • ? 15 teachers have electronic lectures notes
  • ? 20 of courses have lectures notes manuals
  • 0 online lectures.
  • Success rate
  • 30 at from level 1 to 2
  • meantime for bachelor degree is 5 instead of 3
    years
  • from 3 students enrolled at level 1 1 passes to
    2, 1 repeats, 1drops out

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
8
9
Status Quo in statistical terms Facts on FS of
UYI
  • Student population

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
Level 1 4123 3602 4277 2930 4030 3870 5296 5302 7 064
Level 2 1188 1467 1519 1752 1760 1386 1860 2179 2 511
Level 3 814 1275 1604 1622 1967 2150 2271 2233 2 552
Level 4 313 685 877 1182 943 1452 1601 1505 1 456
Level 5 96 208 429 476 358 514 435 280 264
Total 6534 7237 8706 7962 9058 9372 11463 11499 13847
Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
9
10
Status Quo in statistical terms Facts on FS of
UYI
  • Student population

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
10
11
Status Quo in statistical terms FS UYI
(Department of Mathematics)
  • Human resources 26 teachers with 4 full Prof.,
    2 Ass. Prof.,16 lecturers, 4 assistant lecturers.
  • Infrastructures and Equipment 09 office rooms
    (average 2 seats per room), 0 computer for
    undergraduate students,05 computers for 26
    teachers
  • Teaching load
  • Average teaching load per teacher 323 hours.
  • Average number of different subjects taught by a
    teacher 3.8.
  • only 33.2 of hours can be covered on normal
    time.
  • Up to 67.7 must be covered on overtime by
    permanent teachers.
  • Student population in 2007/2008 up to level 5

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Total
988 410 596 240 26 2260
Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
11
12
Status Quo in statistical terms Departments
of Mathematics of Cameroon
  • Student population in 2006/2007

U. Buea U. Douala U. Douala U. Dschang U. Yaoundé I U. Yaoundé I Total
U. Buea ENSET FS U. Dschang ENS FS Total
Level 1 2765(279) 312(24) 1779(244) 1250(239) 675(120) 5302(863) 20509(3132)
Level 2 2765(279) 235(21) 802(99) 395(80) 627(111) 2179(291) 20509(3132)
Level 3 2765(279) 365(34) 459(82) 496(81) 635(108) 2233(456) 20509(3132)
Bachelor level 2765(279) 912(79) 3040(425) 2141(400) 1937(339) 9714(1610) 20509(3132)
Level 4 137(7) 212(14) 277(31) 82(13) 772(65) 1505(177) 2848(300)
Level 5 137(7) 215(14) 9(0) 23(4) x(x) 534(27) x(x)
Total 2924(286) 1339(107) 3328(456) 2252(417) x(x) 11924(1818)
Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
12
13
Status Quo in statistical terms Departments
of Mathematics of Cameroon
  • Teacher population in 2006/2007

U. Buea U. Douala U. Douala U. Dschang U. Yaoundé I U. Yaoundé I Total
U. Buea ENSET FS U. Dschang ENS FS Total
Full Professor 6(0) 1(0) 1(0) 4(0) 8(1) 26(4) 46(5)
Associate Professor 7(2) 1(0) 2(0) 7(1) 32(1) 48(2) 97(3)
Lecturer 65(4) 30(x) 65(x) 66(x) 92(x) 133(16) 451(x)
Assistant Lecturer 67(x) 22(x) 25(x) 31(x) 22(x) 10(4) 177(x)
Teaching Assistant (held by PhD students) 0(0) 5(x) 9(x) 0(0) 0(0) 30(4) 44(x)
Total 145(x) 59(x) 102(x) 108(x) 154(x) 247(30) 815(x)
Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
13
14
Challenges with advanced centres of Excellences
Barriers
  • Political
  • No policy of investment in research in general
  • No restriction at the entrance of the first level
    of the university with the exception of the
    University of Buea ? massicification problem ?
    teachers at all levels heavily overloaded with
    teaching hours ? no time left to build and
    strengthen quality research centres.
  • Research carried out by African mathematicians is
    not perceived by political power as appropriate
    for the local development of the country
  • Most African mathematicians continue to work on
    research topics dealt with in their doctorate
    studies in Europe or North America.
  • Few African mathematicians hold key decision
    making or taking position.
  • National Mathematical Society not functioning in
    some African countries like Cameroon

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
14
15
Challenges with advanced centres of Excellences
Barriers
  • Economical
  • Low salary condition ? teachers invest themselves
    in parallel activities ? low quality research ?
    stagnation of carrier advancement. Example only
    6 teachers at the magisterial level out of the 26
    teachers of Math Dept of FS of UYI, ? 72
    stagnated as lecturers and usually remain to
    retirement.
  • Insufficient research grants for PhD students.
    only 4 teaching assistantships for more than 20
    PhD students.
  • Low seating capacity of classrooms ?
    impossibility of scheduling all the courses hours
    ? insufficient coverage of the full programme
  • insufficient computers equipment for teachers as
    well as for students
  • Best PhD graduates immigrate to European or North
    American universities for better leaving and
    teaching conditions.
  • Poorly furnished library and no access to online
    publications

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
15
16
Challenges with advanced centres of Excellences
Barriers
  • Cultural
  • Mathematicians are believed to be too squared to
    adjust in society.
  • Mathematicians do not know how to compromise in a
    world full of compromises
  • Classical logic is not in accordance with the
    African culture where fuzzy reasoning and chaos
    reign. In African culture for example, the
    concept of time and distance is irrelevant

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
16
17
Challenges with advanced centres of Excellences
Remedies
  • Twining of departments
  • Co direction of Master and PhD thesis with
    mobility of students and teachers will boost the
    quality of the thesis.
  • Visiting professors from the North
  • Joint project proposal redaction addressing key
    development areas of Africa such as management of
    natural resources, food security, health and
    corruption.
  • Departments from the developed countries can
    share with their twins from developing countries
  • access right to online scientific documentation
  • Access right to online lectures notes
  • Lectures notes manuals
  • software licences

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
17
18
Challenges with advanced centres of Excellences
Remedies
  • Strategies to persuade African governments to
    support the development of mathematics
  • Creation of lobby groups
  • More mathematicians should develop interest in
    politics and do politics to seat at the decision
    making and decision taking tables
  • African mathematicians should carry out more
    applied researches for the development of Africa
  • Existing applied research results should be made
    visible
  • Good applied research projects for development
    should be proposed to the government for funding.
  • African mathematicians should actively be
    involved in using their knowledge in solving
    African daily problems
  • Sensitisation workshops on the use of mathematics
    for development with concrete examples will help
  • Large diffusion through different type of media
    (written press, radio, television, Internet,
    etc.) of concrete (visible in the country)
    examples of the use of mathematics in solving
    African development problems

Laure Pauline Fotso
FS, University of Yaoundé I Email
l_fotso_at_yahoo.com
18
19
THANK YOU
20
Is Mathematical research an issue for a
developing country ? Mohamed JAOUA
  • Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis UNESCO
    Chair, Tunis

21
Problems a DC scientist has to face
  • Legitimacy
  • Doesnt research compete education ?
  • Concentration vs dissemination
  • Specialization vs diversity
  • And the conflict on time and priorities
  • Are our researchers credible ?
  • They didnt invent anything we use or need
  • We just dont know how efficient they are no
    evaluation system
  • Do we really need it now ?
  • And are we willing to pay the price ? Scientists,
    politicians, and people
  • Scarcity
  • Material means though Maths and even Applied
    Maths dont need much
  • But what about human resources ?
  • They are scarce ...
  • And above all diverted to the single field
    providing recognition politics
  • As for Applied Mathematics
  • Weak industry gt no problems to solve
  • Weak technical management gt no people to talk
    with
  • Arent applications too much  high tech , isnt
    all this stuff beyond whats needed ?

22
Applied Mathematics are crucial for DC
  • Needed to  produce  engineers
  • A crucial point for any industrial development
  • Development new paradigms have upsurged from
  • The digital revolution
  • Mathematical and numerical modelling are the
    heart of every industrial process
  • Targets are rapidly moving from high tech
    applications to every day ones
  • Computer costs are dropping
  • The industrial globalization
  • Industrial processes are no longer local
  • Technology needs to be proceeded in any place at
    its current level
  • A new deal, with real opportunities for those who
    master Mathematics and IT

23
A tunisian experience
  • 1983-2008 The LAMSIN
  • A  built from scratch  Applied Math laboratory
  • Relying on a serious mathematical background
  • 80 researchers (30 PhD and 12 Professors)
  • 3 research teams associated to INRIA, 2000
  • Good publication activity in international
    journals
  • Master and Doctoral School in Applied Maths
  • A regional role, and an international recognition
  • Networks TamTam (Maghreb), Sarima (Africa),
  • UNESCO Chair  Maths and development  - awarded
    2003
  • AUF regional Excellence Pole (2003 )
  • An indeed international place
  • Collaborative research on mutual interest topics
  • Co-advised PhD theses
  • Conferences (TAM-TAM, PICOF, CARI), workshops,
    ...

24
Elements of strategy
  • Gather together the research force
  • A single national lab for research but
  • Its researchers teach in several Universities
  • Push away the borders
  • Regional groupments
  • Maghreb, Africa, EuroMediterranean
  • Maximal international opening, bringing
  • Expertise, structure, legitimacy
  • North/South complementarities
  • Jealously save the scientific independence
  • However, a global policy is crucial
  • 1996 has been the turning point in Tunisia
  • Better have a lot of luck

25
Main concerns
  • How to deal with thematic transferts ?
  • Focus on methods acquisition
  • Relevance to local applications would come later
  • IT boom, and methods migration, have helped much
  • Can brain drain be opposed in an open world ?
  • Make your place a nice one to work and live in
  • Produce more than they can take
  • Make globalization a chance to that respect (cf
    India)
  • North and South are finally on the same boat
  • Much can be done on the spot
  • Governance is a crucial issue for the future
  • Relevant decisions regarding science need
    scientists
  • Building capacities is a long run task, needing
    broad vision politicians, and a social control

26
Thank you for your attention
www.lamsin.rnu.tn
27
Promoting mathematics in Africa through
theAfrican Mathematics Millennium Science
Initiative (AMMSI)
  • by
  • Wandera Ogana
  • AMMSI PROGRAMME DIRECTOR
  • School of Mathematics, University of Nairobi,
  • P.O. Box 30197, GPO 00100, Nairobi, Kenya
  • E-mail wogana_at_uonbi.ac.ke
  • Presented at the Round Table on Mathematics and
    the Developing World. 5th European Congress of
    Mathematics, 17 th July 2008, Amsterdam, The
    Netherlands

28
1. BRIEF HISTORY
29
1.1 Millennium Science Initiative (MSI)
  • Formulated and fostered by the World Bank in late
    1990s
  • Main Goal Promote ST spearheaded by scientists
    in the Developing countries
  • Administered by Science Initiative Group (SIG)
  • Activities in South America and Asia Brazil,
    Chile, Mexico, Vietnam etc

30
1.2 World Bank/SIG Initiative for Africa
  • Meetings organised through the African Academy of
    Sciences (AAS) and the Thirld World Academy of
    Sciences (TWAS), during 2000 2002, led to
    establishment of initial stage of African MSI in
  • Instrumentation Information Technology
  • Biotechnology
  • Mathematics
  • Meetings of writing group on Mathematics held
    during 2003 2004
  • African Mathematics Millennium Science Initiative
    established in 2005
  • Seed money by The Mellon Foundation and the
    International Mathematical Union in 2005

31
2. OBJECTIVES
  • To strengthen the teaching and learning of
    university mathematics and its applications.
  • To support research in mathematics and
    mathematics education
  • To enhance capacity through linkages and networks
  • To undertake outreach and public education in
    mathematics
  • To enhance the use of ICT in mathematics teaching
    and learning

32
3 ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE
33
3.1 Distributed Network
  • Five Regional Offices each run by a Regional
    Coordinator
  • Central Africa Yaounde, Cameroon (Prof. Bitjong
    Ndombol)
  • Eastern Africa Nairobi, Kenya (Prof. Wandera
    Ogana)
  • Southern Africa Gabarone, Botswana (Prof. Edward
    Lungu)
  • Western Africa, Zone 1 Ibadan, Nigeria (Prof.
    Samwel Ilori)
  • Western Africa, Zone 2 Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
    (Prof. Hamidou Toure)
  • Programme Office located in Nairobi, Kenya

34
3.2 AMMSI Programme Committee
  • Members AMMSI Regional Coordinators
  • Main Functions
  • To Write project proposals for funding
  • To Formulate and design programmes
  • To Implement activities
  • To Liaise with collaborating institutions

35
3.3 Selection and Evaluation Committee
  • Members
  • Prof Bernt Øksendal, University of Oslo, Norway
    (Facilitator)
  • Prof Augustin Banyaga, Pennsylvania State
    University, USA
  • 3rd Member to be appointed from Central Africa
  • Main Functions
  • To select Fellowship candidates
  • To select and evaluate research projects
  • To evaluate the operations of AMMSI

36
4. ACTIVITIES TO DATE
37
4.1 Research/Visiting Scientist Fellowships
  • To enable staff conduct research and postgraduate
    teaching at host universities in sub-Saharan
    African for periods ranging from a few weeks to
    one year
  • 15 Fellowships awarded during 2005 2007
  • Fellowship amounts increased from 3,000 in 2006
    to 5,000 in 2007
  • Impact of fellowships on collaboration, linkages,
    research and publications

38
4.2 Postgraduate Scholarships
  • For Ph.D, M.Sc or Postgraduate Diploma studies in
    universities in sub-Saharan Africa
  • Awarded 170 partial scholarships during 2005
    2007
  • Amounts in the range US 300 1,000
  • Impact of scholarships on postgraduate education,
    research, publications and staff development

39
4.3 Support of Scientific Meetings
  • Conference on Representation Theory in Geometry
    and Physics, Porto Novo, Benin (2005)
  • Conference and Mathematical Biology Workshop,
    Nairobi, Kenya (2006)
  • SAMSA Conference in Windhoek, Namibia (2007)
  • In 2008 to support conference in Central Africa
  • Support by The London Mathematical Society to
    enable postgraduate students attend conferences

40
4.4 Mentoring African Research in Mathematics
(MARM)
  • 4.4.1 Main Objectives
  • Promote mentoring relationships between
    mathematicians in other continents and
    sub-Saharan African colleagues, together with
    their students.
  • Create joint research projects and cultivate
    longer-term partnerships between institutions in
    Africa and those elsewhere

41
  • 4.4.2 Collaborating and Funding Organisations
  • Collaborating Organisations
  • International Mathematical Union (IMU)
  • The London Mathematical Society (LMS)
  • AMMSI
  • Funding Organisations
  • The Nuffield Foundation (from 2005)
  • The Leverhulme Trust (from 2006)

42
4.4.3 Participation
  • The following universities in Africa are
    currently participating
  • Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia
  • University of Buea, Cameroon
  • Kwame Nkurumah University of Science
    Technology, Ghana
  • Six other universities have been selected to join
  • Mentors (and prospective mentors) are
    distinguished mathematicians interested in
    colaborative links with African universities

43
5 WHAT WE HAVE LEARNT
44
5.1 Positive
  • Making a difference to professional careers
    through Fellowships
  • Making a difference to academic future through
    Scholarships
  • Enabling publications by staff and postgraduate
    students
  • Enabling staff and institutions in different
    continents to collaborate through MARM

45
5.2 Room for Improvement
  • Limited funds, hence small scholarship and
    fellowship awards
  • Lack of diversification of activities
  • No funding of research activities
  • No funding to support conference attendance by
    African mathematicians despite the wide interest
    expressed
  • Looking for partners and support to continue and
    extend activities

46
SUPPORTING ORGANISATIONS
47
6.1 Financial Support
  • Mellon Foundation
  • Nuffield Foundation
  • Leverhulme Trust
  • International Mathematical Union
  • London Mathematical Society
  • US National Committee on Mathematics

48
6.2 Facilities and Administrative Support
  • Universite Gaston Berger, Senegal
  • University of Botswana, Botswana
  • University of Ibadan, Nigeria
  • University of Nairobi, Kenya
  • University of Ngaoundere, Cameroon
  • University of Yaounde I, Cameroon
  • University of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
  • Science Initiative Group (SIG)
  • African Academy of Sciences (AAS)

49
THANK YOU
  • website
  • http//www.ammsi.org

50
Partnership of INRIA with African research teams
experience and evolution.Bernard Philippe (INRIA)
  • CARI SARIMA experiences
  • Principles of the sought partnership
  • Some encountered difficulties and associated
    questions

51
Two questions
  • For co-advised PhD students, how to obtain a
    definition of their teaching duties compatible
    with their PhD registration?
  • Some African master programmes only exist because
    of the participation of European lecturers. Is
    this acceptable to continue the support of these
    programmes?

52
International Science ProgrammeUppsala University
  • Mathematics in Sub-Saharan Africa an overview
    of Swedish cooperation,
  • by
  • Leif Abrahamsson (leifab_at_math.uu.se)
  • International Science Programme (ISP), at Uppsala
    University.
  • Focus
  • To strengthen research and postgraduate education
    in basic sciences in developing countries
  • International Programme in Physical Science
    (IPPS) 1961
  • International Programme in Chemical Sciences
    (IPICS) 1970
  • International Programme Mathematical Sciences
    (IPMS) 2001
  • Funded by SAREC (the Swedish Agency for Research
    Cooperation, about 2.5 MEuro 2008) and Uppsala
    University (about 200 kEuro 2008).

53
International Science ProgrammeUppsala University
  • ISP university based organisation
  • base for collegial co-operation
  • recognition among foreign universities
  • as direct co-operation as possible
  • Based on scientific criteria
  • Flexibility
  • Programmes headed by senior scientists

From left to right P. Weke, J. Owino (Nairobi),
J. Mango (Makerere) and I. Mahara
(NUR).EAUMP-meeting in Kigali, March 2008.
54
International Science ProgrammeUppsala University
55
International Science ProgrammeUppsala University
  • ISP Supported Activites 2007
  • Activity Number
  • PhD students 181
  • MSc/Mphil students 332
  • Scholarships within Sweden 52 (251) (months)
  • Sholarships within rest of Europe 15 (60)
    (months)
  • Scholarships within the Regions 55 (227)
    (months)
  • PhD theses 12
  • MSc/Mphil theses 141
  • Publications in international Journals 140
  • Publications in regional/local Journals 56
  • Conference and Workshop contributions 256

Math students at UEM in Maputo.
56
International Science ProgrammeUppsala University
WHERE? Current ISP-supported groups and networks
GNI per Capita USD 2003 World Bank Report 2005
LD as defined in The Least Developed Countries
2002 UNCTAD/LDS/2002
  • AFRICA
  • Low Income Countries
  • LD Burkina Faso 300
  • Cameroon 640
  • LD Ethiopia 90
  • Ghana 320
  • Kenya 390
  • LD Malawi 170
  • LD Mali 290
  • LD Mauritania 430
  • Nigeria 320
  • LD Senegal 550
  • LD Tanzania 290
  • LD Uganda 240
  • LD Zambia 380
  • Zimbabwe 480

ASIA Low Income Countries LD Bangladesh
400 LD Cambodia 310 LD Lao PDR 320 Lower
Middle Income Countries Sri Lanka 930 LATIN
AMERICA Lower Middle Income Countries Ecuador 1,7
90 Peru 2,150 SWEDEN 28,840

Category-1 countries AFRICA Burkina
Faso Ethiopia Kenya Mali Mocambique Rwanda Tanzani
a Uganda Zambia ASIA Bangladesh Cambodia LATIN
AMERICA Bolivia (bilateral countries in red)
57
International Science ProgrammeUppsala University
  • IPMS
  • IPMS started in 2001. Total budget 2008 about
    500 kEuro.
  • EAUMP (network between UoN, UDSM and Makerere
    cooperation since 2002), support 2008 about 110
    kEuro
  • - 6 PhD-students started sandwich programme in
    2003 (graduates in 2008/09) and 7 more in 2007.
  • - A number of MSc-students have graduated (about
    2 each year) regional MSc-courses.
  • - Regional courses and workshops in cooperation
    with ICTP, and maybe with CIMPA in the future.
  • National University of Rwanda is to become member
    of the network.
  • PDE, Modeling and Control (network between the
    universities in Ouagadougou, Nouakchott and
    Saint-Louis cooperation since 2003), support
    2008 about 73 kEuro.
  • 3 PhD-students started in 2007, and 3 more will
    start this year.
  • A number of MSc- and local PhD-students have
    already graduated.
  • The network runs the West African Training School
    (WATS) in cooperation with ICTP, with
    participating students from many West African
    countries.
  • Ghana and Cameroon to be phased out this year, or
    next. Ethiopia is to be incorporated in the
    bilateral Programme from 2009.

58
International Science ProgrammeUppsala University
  • ISP in the future.
  • Support to research groups/departments only in
    so-called Category-1 countries.
  • No new collaboration, even in Category-1
    countries.
  • Networks are not affected by these new rules,
    if Category-1 countries benefit from them.
  • Probably more involvement in bilateral
    programmes in basic science.
  • Bilateral programmes via SAREC
  • - Total annual budget slightly less than 100
    MEuro.
  • 20 for basic science(?).
  • At the moment only two programmes that
    involves mathematics one at Universidad Eduardo
  • Mondlane in Maputo, Mocambique (Swedish
    coordinator at ISP), and one at the National
  • University of Rwanda in Butare, Rwanda
    (Swedish coordinator at Linköping University).
  • SAREC will be replaced by a new unit within
    Sida/Asdi from October 1, 2008.

(More) problems for mathematics - The content,
etc of a bilateral programme is decided by the
receiving university, and mathematics is
(usually) not a prioritised subject. Bilateral
funds are not earmarked for certain
activities (principle of ownership), which could
affect mathematics negatively.
59
Tsou Sheung Tsun, Oxford University
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Zentralblatt
61
(No Transcript)
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Twinned institutions as of July 2008
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Individual Action
  • Individual donations
  • Book donation
  • Donation through national society subscription
  • Honorarium donation
  • Short Courses
  • Intensive courses
  • Cameos
  • Collaboration at Institute level
  • Pay subscription
  • Conference attendance
  • More ...
  • Stepping stone approach
  • Brazil, China, India, Vietnam, ...

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Some relevant contacts
  • ICTP, Trieste, (Le Dung Trang)
  • SIU/NUFU, Bergen, (Ragni Piene, Oslo)
  • ISP, Uppsala, ( Leif Abrahamsson)
  • CIMPA, Nice, (Michel Jambu)
  • SIAM/NSF, (Barbara Keyfitz, Tony Chan)
  • DAAD, Bonn, Nairobi, Dehli, Johannesburg ...
    (German Gov.)
  • SARIMA Rennes (Phillipe Bernard )
  • London Mathematical Society, (John Ball)
  • CIMO, Helsinki (Matti Heiliö, Lappeenranta)
  • NRF, Pretoria (www.nrf.ac.za)
  • ICMI, Paris (Michelle Artigue)
  • MSI, www.msi-sig.org
  • ANSTI, UNESCO, ( J.G.M. Massaquoi)
  • TWAS, Nairobi (H.A. Hassan)
  • ICIAM (Alain Damlamian)
  • CDC_at_IMU (Herb Clemens)
  • CDC_at_EMS (TSOU Sheung Tsun)

Roundtable_at_5ECM, Amsterdam
64
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