South Africa Taking Notes and analyzing a primary source document! - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: South Africa Taking Notes and analyzing a primary source document!


1
South AfricaTaking Notes and analyzing a primary
source document!
2
Directions
  • On a lined piece of paper, write down everything
    that is written in red and answer all questions
    in red on this slide show!

3
South Africa Location
  • South Africa is at the southern most tip of the
    continent of Africa

4
Brief South African History
  • The earliest people
  • The earliest representatives of South Africa's
    diversity at least the earliest we can name
    were the Bushmen and Hottentots. Both were
    resident in the southern tip of the continent for
    thousands of years before its written history
    began with the arrival of European seafarers.
  • And before that, modern human beings had lived
    here for more than 100,000 years indeed, the
    country is an archaeological treasure chest.

5
Settlers and Slaves
  • In 1652, Jan van Riebeeck and 90 other Dutch men
    landed with him at the Cape of Good Hope, under
    instructions by the Dutch East India Company to
    build a fort and develop a vegetable garden to
    feed the men on ships traveling the Eastern trade
    route.
  • Their relationship with the natives was initially
    one of bartering, but a mutual animosity
    developed over issues such as cattle theft and,
    no doubt, the growing suspicion on the part of
    the natives that Van Riebeeck's outpost was
    becoming a threat to them.
  • Perhaps the first sign that the threat was to be
    realized came in 1657 when nine men, released
    from their contracts, were given land to farm. In
    the same year the first slaves were imported. By
    the time Van Riebeeck left in 1662, 250 white
    people lived in what was beginning to look like a
    developing colony.
  • Later governors of the Cape Colony encouraged
    immigration, and in the early 1700s more
    immigrants than natives lived in South Africa.

6
England takes over
  • In 1879, Britain, now becoming the world
    superpower, took over South Africa and discovered
    diamonds there. In 1886, gold was discovered and
    South Africa became the jewel of Africa.
  • In 1909 blacks in South Africa were banned from
    political office and citizens were treated
    harshly.
  • This was the beginning of Apartheid!

7
Apartheid What is it?
  • A South African policy of complete legal
    separation of the races
  • Banned all social contact between blacks and
    whites
  • Allowed the ruling white minority to control and
    terrorize the black majority
  • This is all LEGAL!

8
(No Transcript)
9
  • All citizens were classified by race (LAW).
  • A Black South African must carry a passbook
    issued by the white Government (LAW).
  • Blacks were required to carry passes that
    determined where they could live and work.

10
(No Transcript)
11
  • The Group Areas Act It forced people of certain
    races into living in designated areas.
  • There were racially segregated beaches and public
    areas (LAW).
  • Race laws touched every aspect of social life,
    including prohibiting marriage between non-whites
    and whites and the sanctioning of white-only''
    jobs (LAW).
  • List three ways blacks and whites were separated
    in your own words.

12
(No Transcript)
13
  • The government designated white and colored
    areas.
  • This is a white school campuslook at the
    buildings and the field.
  • Schools were segregated and black schools had to
    teach the white curriculum.

14
(No Transcript)
15
  • The government separated residential areas.
  • Blacks were relocated to new homelandsusually
    the poorest areas with horrible farm land (LAW).
  • South African citizenship was taken away and
    black townships had curfews.
  • These are houses in Soweto, a black township.

16
More Laws
  • Each black homeland controlled its own separate
    education, health and police system.
  • Blacks were not allowed to buy hard liquor. They
    were able to buy poor quality beer.
  • Public beaches, swimming pools, bridges,
    drive-ins, graveyards, parks, and public toilets
    were segregated (LAW).
  • Movie theatres in white areas were not allowed to
    admit blacks. There were practically no cinemas
    in black areas.
  • Restaurants and hotels in white areas were not
    allowed to admit blacks except as staff.
  • Black Africans were prohibited from attending
    white churches.

17
(No Transcript)
18
(No Transcript)
19
  • Segregated public facilities in Johannesburg,
    1985.
  • Schools were segregated and students learned
    white curriculum and spoke in Afrikaaners
    language (LAW).
  • Black schools were intentionally under-funded.

20
(No Transcript)
21
Between 1948 and 1990
  • Approximately 10,000 blacks were killed by the
    notorious system of racial domination.
  • The greatest damage was the dehumanization and
    humiliation of non-whites through ruthless laws
    and practices by about 12 of the population
    (whites).
  • The overwhelming majority of people in South
    Africa were black.

22
What would you do?
  • Would you consider fighting back? How? You have
    no rights, no power

23
(No Transcript)
24
  • Children of Soweto, a Black township some ten
    miles away from Johannesburg, in 1982. The Zulu
    world "Amandla" scrawled on the wall means
    "Power". This was adopted as a rallying call in
    the struggle for Black rights.

25
Resistance Movement
  • The African National Congress was established
    (ANC)
  • ANC organized marches, boycotts and strikes
  • 1960 police gunned down 69 men women and children
    in a peaceful demonstration

26
In 1955
  • The ANC (African National Congress)
  • wrote the Freedom Charter.
  • http//www.anc.org.za/show.php?id72
  • Take a look at this primary source document and
    write the following
  • 3 Things South Africans wanted the world to
    know.
  • 3 rights of the people

27
Resistance
  • Sharpeville Massacre- 69 people (women and
    students) killed by South African police
  • 1974- SA expelled from UN, 1976- banned from
    Olympics
  • 1976- student protests- 600 killed, thousands
    arrested

28
Steven Biko
  • Black Consciousness leader who believed that
    political freedom could only come to black South
    Africans if and when they begin to stop feeling
    inferior to whites
  • Raised awareness around world to the issue of
    apartheid

29
Steven Biko
  • Arrested, put on trial, and died Sept. 22, 1977
    from head wounds while in police custody
  • Since his death in police custody, he has been
    called a martyr of the anti-apartheid movement.
  • While living, his writings and activism attempted
    to empower black people, and he was famous for
    his slogan "black is beautiful", which he
    described as meaning "man, you are okay as you
    are, begin to look upon yourself as a human
    being".
  • Considered a hero

30
Steven Biko
  • He wasnt the devil, as they made him out to be.
    He was a man, just like you and me. Yet he
    suffered immense pain and deadly injuries to
    insure no others would have to see the horror he
    saw before he ceased to breathe.  
  • God Bless Stephen Biko  
  •           -Steve Shep

31
Nelson Mandela
  • Born in 1918 to the chief of the Tembu Tribe
  • University educated
  • Received a law degree
  • Joined African National Congress in 1944 and
    helped with the resistance movement
  • In 1961 he created a new group within the ANC
    that wanted to use violent tactics
  • He was arrested and after several trials was
    given life in prison for plotting to overthrow
    the government

32
Nelson Mandela
  • While in prison he continued to be a symbol and
    leader of the resistance movement
  • President de Klerk was instrumental in releasing
    Mandela in February 1990 and allowing the ANC
  • He and de Klerk worked to create a new
    constitution for all people in South Africa
  • In 1994 Mandela was elected at the first black
    South African Presidenteveryone voted!
  • Mandela and de Klerk won the Nobel Peace Prize in
    1993

33
According to Mandela,
  • "The oppressor must be liberated just as surely
    as the oppressed, for he is the prisoner of
    hatred, robbed of his own humanity."
  • "While the particulars of our histories may have
    been different, the heart of our struggles, from
    Selma to Soweto, has been the same."
  • "Courage is not the absence of fear, but the
    triumph over it."

34
F.W. de Klerk
  • South African president in 1990 (White man)
  • Ended apartheid
  • Freed Nelson Mandela
  • Worked with Mandela to re-write the constitution
    giving all freedoms and rights
  • Won Nobel Peace Prize with Mandela
  • Write down 3 influential people in ending
    Apartheid and how they went about making a
    change!

35
Apartheid 1948 and 1990
  • When apartheid finally collapsed,
  • the oppressors sought amnesty for their
    crimes...while
  • the victims sought justice.

36
Victims of Torture
Psychological complexity of reconciliation
  • Victims who experienced
  • brutality during Apartheid
  • now, at times, feel more
  • alienatedbecause the
  • most dramatic part of the
  • struggle that bonded
  • people together is now
  • over.

37
Constitution
  • Constitution (1996) of South Africa is among the
    most progressive in the world.
  • Among the 27 Fundamental Rights is the right not
    to be discriminated against on any grounds and
    in particular on
  • race, gender, sex, ethnic or social origin,
    colour, sexual orientation, age, disability,
    religion, conscience, belief, culture or
    language.

38
Restitution - Land Claims
  • The bureaucracy has been slow in addressing the
    basic issues of restitution for land claims.
  • The government, for example, promised to
    compensate all families and their descendants who
    lost their property under apartheid.
  • But of the nearly 70,000 claims, only about
    12,000 have been resolved.

39
Low-Cost Housing
40
Unemployment
  • Due to the 40 jobless rate among black
    South Africans, there is a 4 levy on business
    owners and they are forced to pay money
    to finance worker training.
  • Job creation and training
  • education are imperative!!!

41
Job Training
42
Modern South Africa
43
Taking a Stand
  • Just imagine what one person can do to make a
    change.
  • All it takes sometimes is one brave person to
    take a stand
  • Write down how you feel South Africa is doing
    today.
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Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: South Africa Taking Notes and analyzing a primary source document!


1
South AfricaTaking Notes and analyzing a primary
source document!
2
Directions
  • On a lined piece of paper, write down everything
    that is written in red and answer all questions
    in red on this slide show!

3
South Africa Location
  • South Africa is at the southern most tip of the
    continent of Africa

4
Brief South African History
  • The earliest people
  • The earliest representatives of South Africa's
    diversity at least the earliest we can name
    were the Bushmen and Hottentots. Both were
    resident in the southern tip of the continent for
    thousands of years before its written history
    began with the arrival of European seafarers.
  • And before that, modern human beings had lived
    here for more than 100,000 years indeed, the
    country is an archaeological treasure chest.

5
Settlers and Slaves
  • In 1652, Jan van Riebeeck and 90 other Dutch men
    landed with him at the Cape of Good Hope, under
    instructions by the Dutch East India Company to
    build a fort and develop a vegetable garden to
    feed the men on ships traveling the Eastern trade
    route.
  • Their relationship with the natives was initially
    one of bartering, but a mutual animosity
    developed over issues such as cattle theft and,
    no doubt, the growing suspicion on the part of
    the natives that Van Riebeeck's outpost was
    becoming a threat to them.
  • Perhaps the first sign that the threat was to be
    realized came in 1657 when nine men, released
    from their contracts, were given land to farm. In
    the same year the first slaves were imported. By
    the time Van Riebeeck left in 1662, 250 white
    people lived in what was beginning to look like a
    developing colony.
  • Later governors of the Cape Colony encouraged
    immigration, and in the early 1700s more
    immigrants than natives lived in South Africa.

6
England takes over
  • In 1879, Britain, now becoming the world
    superpower, took over South Africa and discovered
    diamonds there. In 1886, gold was discovered and
    South Africa became the jewel of Africa.
  • In 1909 blacks in South Africa were banned from
    political office and citizens were treated
    harshly.
  • This was the beginning of Apartheid!

7
Apartheid What is it?
  • A South African policy of complete legal
    separation of the races
  • Banned all social contact between blacks and
    whites
  • Allowed the ruling white minority to control and
    terrorize the black majority
  • This is all LEGAL!

8
(No Transcript)
9
  • All citizens were classified by race (LAW).
  • A Black South African must carry a passbook
    issued by the white Government (LAW).
  • Blacks were required to carry passes that
    determined where they could live and work.

10
(No Transcript)
11
  • The Group Areas Act It forced people of certain
    races into living in designated areas.
  • There were racially segregated beaches and public
    areas (LAW).
  • Race laws touched every aspect of social life,
    including prohibiting marriage between non-whites
    and whites and the sanctioning of white-only''
    jobs (LAW).
  • List three ways blacks and whites were separated
    in your own words.

12
(No Transcript)
13
  • The government designated white and colored
    areas.
  • This is a white school campuslook at the
    buildings and the field.
  • Schools were segregated and black schools had to
    teach the white curriculum.

14
(No Transcript)
15
  • The government separated residential areas.
  • Blacks were relocated to new homelandsusually
    the poorest areas with horrible farm land (LAW).
  • South African citizenship was taken away and
    black townships had curfews.
  • These are houses in Soweto, a black township.

16
More Laws
  • Each black homeland controlled its own separate
    education, health and police system.
  • Blacks were not allowed to buy hard liquor. They
    were able to buy poor quality beer.
  • Public beaches, swimming pools, bridges,
    drive-ins, graveyards, parks, and public toilets
    were segregated (LAW).
  • Movie theatres in white areas were not allowed to
    admit blacks. There were practically no cinemas
    in black areas.
  • Restaurants and hotels in white areas were not
    allowed to admit blacks except as staff.
  • Black Africans were prohibited from attending
    white churches.

17
(No Transcript)
18
(No Transcript)
19
  • Segregated public facilities in Johannesburg,
    1985.
  • Schools were segregated and students learned
    white curriculum and spoke in Afrikaaners
    language (LAW).
  • Black schools were intentionally under-funded.

20
(No Transcript)
21
Between 1948 and 1990
  • Approximately 10,000 blacks were killed by the
    notorious system of racial domination.
  • The greatest damage was the dehumanization and
    humiliation of non-whites through ruthless laws
    and practices by about 12 of the population
    (whites).
  • The overwhelming majority of people in South
    Africa were black.

22
What would you do?
  • Would you consider fighting back? How? You have
    no rights, no power

23
(No Transcript)
24
  • Children of Soweto, a Black township some ten
    miles away from Johannesburg, in 1982. The Zulu
    world "Amandla" scrawled on the wall means
    "Power". This was adopted as a rallying call in
    the struggle for Black rights.

25
Resistance Movement
  • The African National Congress was established
    (ANC)
  • ANC organized marches, boycotts and strikes
  • 1960 police gunned down 69 men women and children
    in a peaceful demonstration

26
In 1955
  • The ANC (African National Congress)
  • wrote the Freedom Charter.
  • http//www.anc.org.za/show.php?id72
  • Take a look at this primary source document and
    write the following
  • 3 Things South Africans wanted the world to
    know.
  • 3 rights of the people

27
Resistance
  • Sharpeville Massacre- 69 people (women and
    students) killed by South African police
  • 1974- SA expelled from UN, 1976- banned from
    Olympics
  • 1976- student protests- 600 killed, thousands
    arrested

28
Steven Biko
  • Black Consciousness leader who believed that
    political freedom could only come to black South
    Africans if and when they begin to stop feeling
    inferior to whites
  • Raised awareness around world to the issue of
    apartheid

29
Steven Biko
  • Arrested, put on trial, and died Sept. 22, 1977
    from head wounds while in police custody
  • Since his death in police custody, he has been
    called a martyr of the anti-apartheid movement.
  • While living, his writings and activism attempted
    to empower black people, and he was famous for
    his slogan "black is beautiful", which he
    described as meaning "man, you are okay as you
    are, begin to look upon yourself as a human
    being".
  • Considered a hero

30
Steven Biko
  • He wasnt the devil, as they made him out to be.
    He was a man, just like you and me. Yet he
    suffered immense pain and deadly injuries to
    insure no others would have to see the horror he
    saw before he ceased to breathe.  
  • God Bless Stephen Biko  
  •           -Steve Shep

31
Nelson Mandela
  • Born in 1918 to the chief of the Tembu Tribe
  • University educated
  • Received a law degree
  • Joined African National Congress in 1944 and
    helped with the resistance movement
  • In 1961 he created a new group within the ANC
    that wanted to use violent tactics
  • He was arrested and after several trials was
    given life in prison for plotting to overthrow
    the government

32
Nelson Mandela
  • While in prison he continued to be a symbol and
    leader of the resistance movement
  • President de Klerk was instrumental in releasing
    Mandela in February 1990 and allowing the ANC
  • He and de Klerk worked to create a new
    constitution for all people in South Africa
  • In 1994 Mandela was elected at the first black
    South African Presidenteveryone voted!
  • Mandela and de Klerk won the Nobel Peace Prize in
    1993

33
According to Mandela,
  • "The oppressor must be liberated just as surely
    as the oppressed, for he is the prisoner of
    hatred, robbed of his own humanity."
  • "While the particulars of our histories may have
    been different, the heart of our struggles, from
    Selma to Soweto, has been the same."
  • "Courage is not the absence of fear, but the
    triumph over it."

34
F.W. de Klerk
  • South African president in 1990 (White man)
  • Ended apartheid
  • Freed Nelson Mandela
  • Worked with Mandela to re-write the constitution
    giving all freedoms and rights
  • Won Nobel Peace Prize with Mandela
  • Write down 3 influential people in ending
    Apartheid and how they went about making a
    change!

35
Apartheid 1948 and 1990
  • When apartheid finally collapsed,
  • the oppressors sought amnesty for their
    crimes...while
  • the victims sought justice.

36
Victims of Torture
Psychological complexity of reconciliation
  • Victims who experienced
  • brutality during Apartheid
  • now, at times, feel more
  • alienatedbecause the
  • most dramatic part of the
  • struggle that bonded
  • people together is now
  • over.

37
Constitution
  • Constitution (1996) of South Africa is among the
    most progressive in the world.
  • Among the 27 Fundamental Rights is the right not
    to be discriminated against on any grounds and
    in particular on
  • race, gender, sex, ethnic or social origin,
    colour, sexual orientation, age, disability,
    religion, conscience, belief, culture or
    language.

38
Restitution - Land Claims
  • The bureaucracy has been slow in addressing the
    basic issues of restitution for land claims.
  • The government, for example, promised to
    compensate all families and their descendants who
    lost their property under apartheid.
  • But of the nearly 70,000 claims, only about
    12,000 have been resolved.

39
Low-Cost Housing
40
Unemployment
  • Due to the 40 jobless rate among black
    South Africans, there is a 4 levy on business
    owners and they are forced to pay money
    to finance worker training.
  • Job creation and training
  • education are imperative!!!

41
Job Training
42
Modern South Africa
43
Taking a Stand
  • Just imagine what one person can do to make a
    change.
  • All it takes sometimes is one brave person to
    take a stand
  • Write down how you feel South Africa is doing
    today.
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