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Effective Strategies for Bilingual and English Language Learners

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Effective Strategies for Bilingual and English Language Learners Early Childhood Summer Event Sponsored by Region 10 ESC June 24 and 25, 2015 Rossana Ram rez Boyd ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Effective Strategies for Bilingual and English Language Learners


1
Effective Strategies for Bilingual and
English Language Learners
  • Early Childhood Summer Event
  • Sponsored by Region 10 ESC
  • June 24 and 25, 2015
  • Rossana Ramírez Boyd, Ph. D.
  • Bilingual/ESL Teacher Certification Programs

2
Session Objectives
  • Participants will be able to
  • Synthesize the process of first and second
    language acquisition.
  • Articulate linguistic, academic, cultural , and
    socio- cognitive considerations when educating
    bilingual and English learners to age five.
  • 3. Practice effective strategies to promote the
    development of language and content.

3
The process of first and second language
acquisition
First language acquisition Second language acquisition
An instinct, triggered by birth Babbling (8 to 12 months) A personal choice, requires motivation
Very rapid One or more words (12 to 36 months) Varies
Complete Phrases and some complete sentences (36 months to 5 years old) Competence can be achieved
Natural (no instruction) Natural or guided Formal instruction is required
4
Babbling
5
One or more words
6
Phrases, complete sentences
7
What affects second language acquisition?Dr.
Stephen Krashens hypotheses
  • (Comprehensible Input Hypothesis) La hipótesis de
    la retroalimentación
  • (Affective Filter) El filtro afectivo
  • (Natural Order) El orden natural
  • (Motivation) La motivación

8
Activity 1
  • Brainstorm actions/activities that can be
    implemented to assist children in developing
    their second language based on each of the
    following
  • Comprehensible _________________________________
  • (Affective Filter)_______________________________
    ____
  • (Natural Order) ________________________________
    ___
  • (Motivation) ___________________________________
    ___

9
BICS and CALPDr. Jim Cummins
Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS)
Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP)
10
Common Underlying Proficiency (CUP) Model of
Bilingualism
  • Jim Cummins believes that while learning one
    language, a child acquires a set of skills and
    knowledge that can be drawn upon when learning in
    another language.
  • This Common Underlying Proficiency (CUP) provides
    the basis for the development of the first
    language (L1) and the second language (L2).

11
Other research
  • The relationship between first and second
    language acquisition suggests that access to
    bilingual programming can assist dual language
    learners (DLLs) in their language and literacy
    development (August Shanahan, 2006).
  • For example, research with Spanish-speaking
  • bilingual children has shown that first language
    skills and growth in Spanish contribute to the
    development of reading skills in English (Hammer,
    Lawrence, Miccio, 2007 Rinaldi Páez, 2008).

12
Activity 2
  • Work in your group to come up with an answer to
    this question. Choose one group representative to
    report to the group as a whole after.
  • In your opinion, what should an effective early
    childhood program look like for bilingual
    children?

13
Anatomy of a High Quality Early Childhood Program
for Bilingual and English Language Learners
  • Has qualified instructional staff.
  • Bilingual and non-bilingual staff are
    knowledgeable about how bilingual children
    develop and learn.
  • Uses a curriculum that supports the development
    of content, first, and/or second language
    acquisition.
  • Uses bilingual materials and books.

14
Anatomy
  • Uses an instructional approach that promotes
    bilingualism and biliteracy
  • (Ex. One way or two way dual language).
  • Uses culturally responsive practices.
  • Practices ongoing assessment.
  • Engages the families.

15
Linguistic considerations when educating young
bilingual and English learners
  • Will have different characteristics and language
    proficiency levels in English and in their native
    language.
  • May have difficulties communicating, following
    directions, expressing ideas and feelings, and
    responding to questions consistently because of
    the lack of English language proficiency.
  • Need to help them develop academic English. For
    example, explicit instruction of the academic
    language related to basic mathematics concepts
    and skills.

16
Cross-linguistic Transfer
  • There is a positive transfer between L1 and L2
    in several areas
  • phonemic awareness
  • decoding through phonics and word recognition
    strategies and
  • the use of cognates and general comprehension
    strategies.

17
Academic
  • The use of childrens first language in
    instruction leads to higher social, cognitive,
    and academic achievement levels for bilingual
    learners (García, Kleifgen, Falchi, 2008).
  • The goals of the language of instruction approach
    used.

18
Instructional Process for Biliteracy Development
Content Area Instruction (Introduced in L1
reinforced in L2)
Content-area Knowledge
Primary-language Content-area Knowledge
English Language Development
English Language Proficiency Literacy
Primary-language Oral Proficiency and Literacy
Skills
Transfer
Continuation of Primary-language Instruction
for Literacy
Primary-language Literacy
19
National Data on Most Effective Programs
(Standardized Reading Scores)
average Reading score of native English
speakers
(Thomas Collier, 2002)
20
Socio-cultural
  • May be the childs first time in a different
    socio-cultural environment than their familys.
  • Will bring different family and community
    experiences to the classroom.
  • Childrens participation in the classroom will
    promote socio-cultural development.

21
Emotional
  • May feel withdrawn
  • Insecure
  • Under stress

22
Activity 3
  • In your experience, what linguistic, academic,
    socio-cultural, and emotional characteristics
    have you observed in bilingual and ELL children
    at your school?

23
Effective strategies to promote the
development of language and content
  • Provide focused small-group activities.
  • Peer-assisted interventions.
  • Explicit instruction of vocabulary instruction
    and phonological awareness.
  • Repeated exposure to specific words opportunities
    for children to use these words multiple times.

24
Effective Strategies
  • Using read-alouds and direct teaching of core
    vocabulary, using the primary language.
  • Using pictures of vocabulary words to illustrate
    word meanings (Roberts and Neal 2004).
  • Using hand puppets.
  • Using game-like activities to illustrate concepts
    and actions.
  • Engaging children physically (Pasnak, 2006).

25
Effective strategies
  • Offering multimedia---enhanced instruction in the
    form of videos for vocabulary instruction with
    non-fiction texts (Silverman and Hines 2009).
  • Using materials with familiar content to promote
    comprehension and facilitate learning new
    concepts. and skills (Kenner 1999).
  • Singing songs
  • Story telling
  • Role plays

26
Strategies to Promote Biliteracy
  • Display the Alphabet in both languages,
  • Classroom labels in both languages (includes
    shelves, supplies, etc.),
  • Students work displayed in both languages,
  • Use of bilingual pairs and bilingual groups for
    instruction,
  • Integrate listening, speaking, reading and
    writing activities.

27
Strategies for Reading Instruction
  • Combine whole classroom work, individual tasks,
    partner activities, small group discussions,
    individual learning,
  • Write and read about experiences of home, family
    and community,
  • Plan instruction around themes to maximize
    opportunities for students to acquire language
    and concepts.

28
Benefits of Biliteracy and Bilingualism
  • Provides students access to academic content,
  • Allows students to have meaningful social
    interactions with their peers and adults,
  • Provides access to the students prior knowledge
    and experiences and connects their prior
    knowledge to current lessons,
  • Promotes first and second language development.

29
Activity 4
  • In pairs, choose one of the activities mentioned
    before to role play it to the group as a whole as
    if you were teaching to pre-school bilingual
    children. This can be in English or in another
    language.
  • Ex. A song, telling a story, a game for
    vocabulary development, physical activity,
    phonemic awareness, etc.

30
Percent of Population Growth and Projected
Population Growth by Race/Ethnicity, Texas
Source U.S. Census Counts, and Texas State Data
Center 2008 Population Projections, 0.5 Scenario
30
31
Projected Racial and Ethnic Percent, Texas,
2000-2040
Source Texas State Data Center 2008 Population
Projections , 2000-2007 Migration Scenario
31
32
Session Objectives
  • Participants will be able to
  • Synthesize the process of first and second
    language acquisition.
  • Articulate linguistic and cultural considerations
    when educating bilingual and English learners to
    age five.
  • 3. Practice effective strategies to promote the
    development of language and content.

33
For additional information contact
  • Dr. Rossana Boyd
  • Tel. 940-391-4800
  • Rossana.boyd_at_unt.edu
  • Bilingual and English as a Second Language
    Education
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