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Title: OVERVIEW ON AMCHAM BRAZIL INSTITUTIONAL PROFILE


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OVERVIEW ON AMCHAM BRAZIL INSTITUTIONAL PROFILE
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4
WHAT
WE ARE
72
MOST VALUABLE BRANDS BELONG TO AMCHAM MEMBER
COMPANIES
OF THE 100
COMPANIES FROM MORE THAN 40 NATIONALITIES
  • The largest among the 104 Amchams outside the
    U.S
  • Providers of the most active and complex set of
    products and services compared to those of all
    other associations
  • Average of 16 participations of member companies
    per year
  • Generators of content and proposals
  • More than 1,700 activities in 2013 for the
    business audience
  • Seminars, Business Round Ups, Open and Strategic
    committees
  • Relevant discussions about international trade,
    logistics, marketing, finance, sales
    distribution
  • Amcham representatives were 1,652 times on the
    media in 2013

United States Switzerland Great
Britain Germany Italy Argentina Canada The
Netherlands Portugal Belgium Sweden Mexico Austra
lia Chile Ireland Austria Colombia South
Korea Denmark Finland India South Africa Antigua
and Barbuda Dutch Antilles The Philippines Hondura
s Israel Luxemburg Norway Paraguay
5
WE DO
WHAT
Defense of free enterprise, respecting society
and the environment and increasing
competitiviness by strengthening Brazil-U.S.
relations
  • GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS
  • Key role in connecting private and public sectors
    in Brazil and the U.S., considering some main
    issues such as the cotton dispute within WTO, the
    Generalized System of Preferences and the Global
    Entry program in the U.S.
  • AMCHAM ACTIVITIES (2013)
  • 150 thematic committees
  • More than 2,000 speakers, among
    CEO/director-level business leaders, besides
    governmental and diplomatic authorities
  • More than 60,000 executives participated in
    business seminars and committees.

6
  • Foreign Partnership access to services designed
    for companies that want to understand the overall
    opportunities and challenges of the Brazilian
    market
  • 1 year special membership
  • Up-to-Date Brazil Highlights Presentation
    Industry Focus Foreign Trade and Regulatory
    Overviews
  • Trade Intelligence Monthly Update Newsletter
  • How To Do Business and Invest in Brazil Series
  • Support from the AMCHAM Brazils Trade
    Intelligence Unit
  • Business Contact Information
  • Matchmaking for meetings with companies
    associated to AMCHAM Brazil
  • Current Foreign Partners (15) segments

IT Agribusiness Health Real Estate Clothing FB He
alth Metallurgy Manufacturing
7
  • Internationalization Program advanced services
    designed for companies that are ready to go to
    Brazil
  • Brazil with Z Project business intelligence
    consulting project tailored-made for your product
  • Compass Project real estate and tax analysis to
    head your company to the best site location
  • Sourcing report on specific contact information
    of 10 potential suppliers, business partners or
    industry/services associations in Brazil
  • Matchmaking schedule of up to 5 meetings with
    specific companies according to a profile
  • How To Do Business and Invest in the U.S
    opportunity to promote your companys expertise
    in 2,000 booklets aimed at helping Brazilian
    investors and exporters to enter the U.S. market
  • Trade Missions opportunity to receive Brazilian
    buyers and suppliers in your company or to AMCHAM
    Brazil support in visiting companies in 13 cities
    in Brazil.

8
Exploring opportunities in Agribusiness,
Infrastructure and Information Technology 8th
12th September 2014
  • Objective
  • Contribute to the development and generation of
    business and provide access to information about
    important fields in the Agribusiness,
    Infrastructure and Information Technology
    industry in Brazil
  • Facilitate commercial activities through content,
    business opportunities, investments and
    partnerships
  • Organize meetings and technical visits in
    enterprises, businesses, associations,
    universities and governmental entities.

9
HOW TO DO BUSINESS AND INVEST IN BRAZIL
10
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS common doubts on how
to do business in Brazil
  • Do I need a VISA?
  • Yes, you need a VISA to go to Brazil
  • The validity for tourist and business visa varies
    according to the nationality of the traveler.
  • Expatriates can have temporary work visa,
    temporary resident visa and also permanent
    resident visa.
  • What are the main taxes in the country and their
    differences?
  • Profit the Corporate Income Tax (IRPJ) and the
    Social Contribution on Net Profits (CSLL)
    (jointly referred as Corporate Income Taxes
    CIT) and
  • Revenue PIS and Cofins
  • Manufactured Products IPI
  • Financial transactions IOF
  • State and Municipal taxes ICMS, ISS, IPTU, ITBI,
    etc.
  • How long does it take to open a business?
  • The process takes on average three months
  • There is necessity of a legal representative
    resident in Brazil
  • A bank account must be open and the currency used
    must be Real.
  • When can my company repatriate profits from
    Brazil?
  • There is no minimum period and any type of
    previous authorization.
  • What are the most common types of partnership
    used in the country?
  • MOU, LOI and Joint Ventures.
  • Does my company need a minimum capital to be
    open?
  • As a general rule, no minimum capital is required
    to open a business in Brazil.
  • Is there taxes to repatriate profits from Brazil?
  • The profit can be remitted abroad with no
    limitation and it is not subject to income tax
    withholding.
  • What are the main types of companies to be
    established in Brazil?
  • Sociedade Anônima corporate capital is divided
    into shares, shareholders must subscribe and pay
    at least 10 of the capital
  • Sociedade Limitada corporate capital is divided
    in quotas, there is no minimum corporate capital.
  • What are the resources to foster foreign
    investment in Brazil?
  • There are a sort of resources, as PPP for
    example
  • Department of Commerce and Promotion Agencies in
    the States.

More information about the Brazilian market on
www.amcham.com.br/howto
11
WHY TO DO BUSINESS AND INVEST IN BRAZIL
12
FDI, DEBT INTERNATIONAL RESERVES protection
against external shocks
New insertion in international trade and capital market 2003 - 2013 cumulative
Trade Surplus/Deficit USD 312.2 billion
FDI (net) USD 414.9 billion
Portfolio Investment (net) USD 213.1 billion
2003 2013
External Net Debt of Brazilian Government - USD 65.7 billion (Debt) USD 312.02 billion (Credit)
International Reserves USD 54 billion USD 375.8 billion
13
Foreign Direct Investments
  • According to UNCTAD, Brazil received US63
    billion on FDI in 2013
  • Major investments' sectors and number of
    projects
  • IT (105)
  • Industrial Production (94)
  • Services (53)
  • Retail (44)
  • Finances (35)
  • Mining (35)
  • Automotive (33)
  • Chemicals (32)
  • Transportation and logistics (17)
  • Equipments (16)
  • Real Estate and construction (12)
  • Clean Technology (11)
  • Energy (8)
  • Major countries that invest in Brazil
  • USA
  • UK
  • Spain

FDI - Major cities of destinations and number of
projects
Data from 2011
  • Public and private investments in Brazil
    represents 18 of GDP.

14
MAJOR INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS
Goal 2 international airports 270
regional airports US 18.7 bi
Goal 10,000 Km US91.1 bi
Goal 511 km US35.6 bi
Goal 7,500 km US42 bi
Goal 159 ports US54.6 bi
Data in billion dollars Exchange rate US1.00
R2.30 Source Ministério da Fazenda
15
Commodities BOOM challenges to expand Brazils
share (1,3) at global trade
  • Commodity prices boomed from 2009 on, fostered
    mainly by Chinese consumption.
  • Brazilian exports of both finished goods and raw
    materials responded to a South-South diplomatic
    effort to diversify trade relations with
    developing countries
  • Challenges for the Brazilian trade policy how to
    get a diversified exports in terms of products
    and add more value to the global supply chain?

16
TRADE BALANCE (2013) maintaining high levels of
total trade
  • Exports US 242.2 billion (-1)
  • Imports US 239.6 biillion (6,5)
  • Surplus US 2.56 billion
  • Trade Flow US 481.8 billion (2,6)
  • Main Trade Partners
  • China US 83.3 bn (17,3 share)
  • U.S. US 60.85 bn (12,6 share)
  • Argentina US 35.4 bn (7,3 share)
  • Top Suppliers
  • China US 37.3 bn (15,6 share)
  • U.S. US 36 bn (15,03 share)
  • Argentina US 16.4 bn (6.8 share)
  • Top Buyers

EXPORTS 2013 Share 2012 Share Change
EXPORTS 2013 Share 2012 Share (2012-2013)
Iron Ore 32.491.530.731 13,42 30.989.292.517 12,77 4,85
Soya Bean whether or not broken 22.812.299.141 9,42 17.455.200.216 7,2 30,69
Heavy Oil 12.956.607.442 5,35 20.305.876.591 8,37 -36,19
Sugarcane sugar 9.163.695.920 3,78 10.030.103.067 4,13 -8,64
dredgers, floating or submersible drilling or production platforms 7.735.537.406 3,19 1.457.770.654 0,6 430,64
Other Products 157.018.978.633 64,84 162.339.770.501 66,93 -3,27
T O T A L 242.178.649.273 100 242.578.013.546 100 -0,2
IMPORTS 2013 Share 2012 Share Change
IMPORTS 2013 Share 2012 Share (2012-2013)
Heavy Oil 16.319.989.349 6,81 13.409.657.184 6,01 21,7
Passenger Vehicles 9.081.176.473 3,79 9.566.747.498 4,29 -5,08
Fuel Oils 8.345.974.191 3,48 6.711.698.984 3,01 24,35
Autoparts 8.296.706.324 3,46 6.768.614.037 3,03 22,58
Medicines 6.704.060.156 2,8 6.113.332.565 2,74 9,66
Other products 190.872.998.412 79,66 180.613.426.375 80,92 5,68
T O T A L 239.620.904.905 100 223.183.476.643 100 7,36
17
TRADE BALANCE (1st semester, 2014) maintaining
high levels of total trade
  • Exports US 110.532 billion (-2.6)
  • Imports US 113.022 billion (-3)
  • Deficit -US 2.490 billion
  • Trade Flow US 223.554 billion (-2,8)
  • Main Trade Partners
  • China US 42.285 billion
  • U.S. US 30.405 billion
  • Argentina US 14.452 billion
  • Top Suppliers
  • China US 23.880 billion (21.6 share)
  • U.S. US 12.792 billion (11.6 share)
  • Argentina US 7.418 billion (6.7 share)
  • Top Buyers
  • China US 18.405 billion (16.3 share)
  • U.S. US 17.613 billion (15.6 share)

EXPORTS 2014 (JAN/MAY) 2014 (JAN/MAY) 2013 (JAN/MAY) 2013 (JAN/MAY) Change
EXPORTS 2014 (JAN/MAY) 2014 (JAN/MAY) 2013 (JAN/MAY) 2013 (JAN/MAY) (2013-2014)
Soya Bean 15.576.513.194 17 13.130.100.644 14 18,63
Metallurgical Ore 12.736.343.768 14 13.239.394.602 14 -3,8
Soya Bean whether or not broken 12.552.176.849 14 10.377.357.383 11 20,96
Iron Ore 11.723.726.015 13 12.371.342.888 13 -5,23
Heavy Oil 9.017.697.037 10 8.289.233.779 8,9 8,79
Other Products 28.457.510.085 32 35.882.648.931 38 -42,81
T O T A L G E R A L 90.063.966.948 100 93.290.078.227 100 -3,46
IMPORTS 2014 (JAN/MAY) 2014 (JAN/MAY) 2013 (JAN/MAY) 2013 (JAN/MAY) Change
IMPORTS 2014 (JAN/MAY) 2014 (JAN/MAY) 2013 (JAN/MAY) 2013 (JAN/MAY) (2013-2014)
Heavy Oil 5.728.008.152 6 6.429.293.491 6,5 -10,91
Fuel Oils 3.495.571.866 3,7 4.163.442.525 4,2 -16,04
Autoparts 3.206.734.081 3,4 3.434.059.141 3,5 -6,62
Passenger Vehicles 3.180.741.939 3,4 3.412.801.229 3,5 -6,8
Medicines 2.810.821.776 3 2.913.660.474 3 -3,53
Other Products 76.497.197.840 81 78.318.393.594 79 40,1
T O T A L 94.919.075.654 100 98.671.650.454 100 -3,8
18
U.S. BRAZIL TRADE BALANCE Brazils deficit on
the post-crisis period
BRAZILIAN EXPORTS TO THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS BRAZILIAN EXPORTS TO THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS BRAZILIAN EXPORTS TO THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS BRAZILIAN EXPORTS TO THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS BRAZILIAN EXPORTS TO THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS BRAZILIAN EXPORTS TO THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS
2013 (JAN/DEZ) 2013 (JAN/DEZ) 2012 (JAN/DEZ) 2012 (JAN/DEZ) Var. rel US
Description Value Value 2013/2012
  US FOB Part US FOB Part JAN-DEZ
TOTAL 24.652.515.702 100,00 26.700.844.268 100,00 -7,67
Crude oils 3.481.274.447 14,12 5.577.677.018 20,89 -37,59
Semimanufactured iron or steel 1.287.595.694 5,22 1.470.302.155 5,51 -12,43
Ethanol 1.022.161.209 4,15 1.397.357.043 5,23 -26,85
Chemical woodpulp, soda or sulfate, other than dissolving grades Nonconiferous 958.654.372 3,89 828.158.765 3,10 15,76
Raw coffee beans 884.439.351 3,59 1.054.549.191 3,95 -16,13


BRAZILIAN IMPORTS FROM THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS BRAZILIAN IMPORTS FROM THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS BRAZILIAN IMPORTS FROM THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS BRAZILIAN IMPORTS FROM THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS BRAZILIAN IMPORTS FROM THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS BRAZILIAN IMPORTS FROM THE US - MAIN PRODUCTS
2013 (JAN/DEZ) 2013 (JAN/DEZ) 2012 (JAN/DEZ) 2012 (JAN/DEZ) Var. rel US
Description Value   Value   2013/2012
T O T A L 36.001.999.377 100 32.362.684.966 100 11,25
Fuel oils (diesel oil, "fuel-oil", etc.) 2.767.743.801 7,69 2.763.149.448 8,54 0,17
Engines and turbines for aviation and its parts 1.154.370.077 3,21 940.601.695 2,91 22,73
Wheat and meslin Other 1.131.029.680 3,14 13.549.919 0,04 ---
Bituminous coal 957.873.316 2,66 1.138.204.945 3,52 -15,84
Gasoline 948.214.636 2,63 565.217.357 1,75 67,76
19
U.S. BRAZIL TRADE BALANCE Main ports of entry
IMPORTS FROM THE US - PORTS OF ENTRY (US) IMPORTS FROM THE US - PORTS OF ENTRY (US) IMPORTS FROM THE US - PORTS OF ENTRY (US) IMPORTS FROM THE US - PORTS OF ENTRY (US) IMPORTS FROM THE US - PORTS OF ENTRY (US) IMPORTS FROM THE US - PORTS OF ENTRY (US) IMPORTS FROM THE US - PORTS OF ENTRY (US)
PORT / AIRPORT 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008
SANTOS - PORT - SP 9.763.583.852 9.320.762.161 9.814.494.854 8.336.789.148 6.045.386.775 7.328.218.113
CAMPINAS - AIRPORT - SP 4.589.258.410 4.112.575.158 4.040.544.445 3.787.089.163 3.679.232.840 4.203.639.132
SAO PAULO - AIRPORT - SP 2.586.837.557 2.661.159.163 2.854.527.534 2.542.161.181 1.887.471.750 2.799.474.593
SAO LUIS - PORT - MA 2.500.255.236 2.286.285.024 2.059.910.884 1.689.971.915 400.630.074 825.643.793
RECIFE - PORT (SUAPE) - PE 2.269.249.179 1.254.787.509 1.412.665.144 636.897.841 323.946.063 456.125.332
RIO DE JANEIRO - PORT - RJ 1.872.665.719 1.740.183.071 1.882.462.368 1.551.295.028 1.190.416.566 1.727.385.948
VITORIA - PORT - ES 1.627.629.414 1.620.086.950 2.014.522.736 1.375.295.912 1.293.920.174 1.401.058.978
MANAUS - PORT - AM 1.162.473.339 1.230.711.012 1.139.400.601 725.789.639 380.521.589 642.642.693
PORTO DE PARANAGUA - PORT - PR 1.069.588.871 1.093.129.222 967.385.982 583.334.239 351.617.720 439.111.992
PORTO DE RIO GRANDE - PORT - RS 942.775.416 703.523.819 642.733.661 647.972.948 436.898.897 755.553.599
SAO LUIS - PORT - MA
MANAUS - PORT - AM
RECIFE - PORT (SUAPE) - PE
VITORIA - PORT - ES
RIO DE JANEIRO - PORT - RJ
PORTO DE PARANAGUA - PORT - PR
SANTOS - PORT SP CAMPINAS - AIRPORT SP SAO
PAULO - AIRPORT - SP
PORTO DE RIO GRANDE - PORT - RS
20
BRAZIL AS A GLOBAL PLAYER
Brazilian Companies in the U.S
  • Brazilian companies are looking for global
    competitiveness
  • Among Forbes ranking named Global 2000, with the
    largest companies in the world, 31 are Brazilian
  • Petrobrás 20th
  • Itaú Unibanco 42nd
  • Banco Bradesco 45th
  • Banco do Brasil 67th
  • Vale 87th
  • Internationalization movements specially directed
    to Latin America

21
INCOME UNEMPLOYMENT growing purchasing power
  • The minumum wage in Brazil is R724,00 (around
    US314,78)
  • From 2002 to 2014, minimum wage rose 72.31
  • Unemployment rate went from a peak of 13.1 in
    mid-2004 to 4.3 in 2013
  • Unemployment rate in 2013 4,3 (Lowest since
    2002)
  • Challenges Unions pressure for higher wages

Exchange rate US1,00 R2,30
22
SOCIAL MOBILITY the dream of a middle class
country
  • Income transfer social policies focusing on
    erradicate extreme poverty by 2014
  • Requirements for Families enrolling their
    children in schools and take them to periodic
    medical appointments
  • Outcomes By 2009, C class comprised, for the
    first time in history, more than half of the 190
    million Brazilian population
  • For the first time in their lives, a large
    portion of Brazilians gains access to bank
    account and credit, housing, travelling and basic
    consumer goods (refrigerators, TV sets, ovens,
    mobile phones, etc.)

23
TAXATION Increasing life cost in the country
  • Brazil has more than 60 types of taxes, in a
    Federal, State and Municipal scope.
  • On the ranking of working days to pay annual
    taxes, Brazil is in the second position. A
    citizen must work 150 days in order to pay its
    taxes, and the taxes account for 36,3 of the
    GDP.
  • This average is different considering each type
    of social classe in Brazil
  • Low wage (until R 3.000) 143 days -gt 39 of
    personnal wage
  • Medium wage (from R 3.000 until R 10.000) 159
    days -gt 43 of personnal wage
  • High wage (more than R 10.000) 152 days -gt 42
    of personnal wage
  • Some products have a very high percentage of
    taxes within their prices, such as cigarretes
    (80), vodca (82) and foreign perfumes (78)

24
The Great Discrepancy structural bottlenecks for
Brazils competitiveness
  • Size and efficiency of the State
  • Labor qualification
  • Enormous infra-structure gap
  • Low level of investment

25
New approach Governmental policies (2012-2013)
  • Strengthening of the domestic market consumption
  • Tax reduction on specific sectors
  • Vehicles
  • Construction
  • Textiles/clothing
  • Interest rate reduction public banks leading the
    way to the offer of more credit at lower costs
  • Barriers for imports
  • Major goals (2014)
  • Reach/maintain GDP growth at 1,10
  • Prevent inflation from surpassing established
    targets
  • Push for reforms on ports sector to increase
    exports competitiveness
  • Increase the level of private and public
    investments

26
Industry Focus Challenges and Opportunities
Energy Information Technology
Pharmaceuticals Healthcare Automotive
Metal Logistics
27
ENERGY oil, gas and renewable sources
  • 44.2 of the domestic supply of energy comes from
    renewable sources
  • The electricity production is 83.8 from
    renewable sources
  • Federal Government has just negotiated with
    concessionaries to cut energy costs up to 32 to
    businesses and 18 to households
  • The Program of Incentives to Alternative
    Electricity Sources aims to install 3,300 MW of
    capacity from wind, biomass and SHP plants
  • Electricity actual consumption of 467,700 GW is
    forecasted to reach 730,000 GW until 2020
  • Second biggest oil producer in South America
  • Pre-salt oil layer forecasted to add at least 1.9
    million bpd by 2020
  • Despite being an oil exporter, Brazil still has
    to import refined oil
  • Petrobras is the fifth largest energy company in
    the world and had US23,5 billion net income in
    2013
  • Brazil is the second largest producer of
    biodiesel
  • Around 45 of the fleet is adapted to use ethanol
    (made from sugarcane, 6.6 times more efficient
    than corn ethanol), the share of ethanol in
    gasoline is likely to raise to 25

28
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY growing demand for
innovative services
Main Clusters
  • 7th largest market Brazilian IT market grew over
    15 in 2013
  • The country represents 47.4 of the IT market in
    Latin America
  • Companies 10,700 (94 small or median)
  • Forecast reach US 200 billion until 2020
  • Employment 1.3 million
  • Software investments (2013) R25 billion
    (US10.8 billion)
  • Highlights The industrial and financial sectors
    represent almost 50 of the user market
  • Brazil reached 125 mobile subscribes per 100
    people (forecasted to reach 170 until 2015) and
    10 broadband subscribes per 100 people
    (forecasted to reach 13 until 2015)
  • Federal programs Start Up Brasil with US40
    million to finance national or foreign services
    and softwares start ups. IT has US 243 million
    to invest on financing, tax exemptions,
    education, infrastructure and RD.

Exchange rate US1.00 R2.30
29
Pharmaceuticals Healthcare open doors for RD
and innovation
Main Clusters
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • 8º largest market for medications and drugs
  • 400 companies (380 Brazilian)
  • Revenue 2013 US 24.78 billion (4.2 of the GDP)
  • 16 growth compared to 2012
  • Investments US 139 million on clinical
    researches
  • Foreign Trade (2012) deficit of US 6,6 billion
  • Government launched US 5 billion investment plan
    to foster mainly innovation
  • GDP Share (2013) 10,2
  • Highlights generics unit sales grew 17 and
    personal care reached 3rd global position with
    US 43 billion in revenue
  • Healthcare
  • Free access to health services is provided
    through the Unified Health System (SUS).
  • 80 of the population depends solely on this
    system that has over 6,000 accredited hospitals
    and pharmaceutical public companies
  • Besides SUS there are private healthcare plans
    and health insurance plans available, covering
    58.6 million people
  • The health care sector accounts for US 416.46
    billion

30
Automotive Industry strategic sector for GDP
growth and employment
  • Companies
  • Assemblers 29
  • Autoparts 500
  • Dealers 5,116
  • Industrial Units 53
  • Production capacity/year
  • 4.5 million (vehicles)
  • 109 thousand (agricultural machinery)
  • Revenue US 106.8 billion the forth market in
    the world
  • Investments (2012-2016)US 26,2 billion
  • Vehicles production grew almost 10 (2013)
  • Employment (2013) 1.5 million

Main clusters (number of assemblers)
31
MetalS leadership in Latin America
Steel production parks
  • 29 mills controlled by 11 business groups in 10
    states
  • Major steel consuming sectors Construction
    Automotive Capital goods, Machinery and
    Equipment (including Agricultural) Housewares
    and Commercial.
  • Crude Steel Production 34.2 million tons
  • Brazil is the 9th largest producer of steel in
    the world
  • Largest steel manufacturer in Latin America
  • Main products exported to USA
  • Semifinished products of iron or nonalloy steel
  • Nonalloy pig iron containing by weight 0.5
    percent or less of phosphorus
  • Other alloy steel in ingots or other primary
    forms
  • Largest steel metal companies in Brazil
  • Arcelor Mittal Brasil
  • Usiminas
  • CSN
  • Gerdau Aços Longos
  • Gerdau Açominas

32
Logistic Infrastructure large events and PPPs
  • The most important port in the country is the
    port of Santos, in the State of São Paulo, the
    busiest container port in Latin America
  • The highway network accounts for 61.8 of the
    cargo transported in the country
  • Forecast
  • BNDES (National Bank for Economic and Social
    Development) will invest US400 billion between
    2014 to 2017 in infrastructure projects. This
    amount represents a 36.2 increase compared to
    2009-2012. Major segments
  • Oil Gas US 184.5 bi
  • Transportation Logistics US 74.7 bi
  • Electric Energy US 61.7 bi
  • Telecommunication US 42.8 bi
  • Sanitation US 36.9 bi

International Airports
Ports
Highways
Railroads
212 thousand km 29
thousand km 28
international airports 37 public
ports
33
Thank you Camila Moura International Affairs
and Trade Manager American Chamber of Commerce
AMCHAM Brazil (55) 11 5180-3756 camila.moura_at_amch
ambrasil.com.br
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