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Leadership Capacity Building for Manufacturing and Manufacturing-Related Programs Workshop

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Title: Leadership Capacity Building for Manufacturing and Manufacturing-Related Programs Workshop


1
Leadership Capacity Building for Manufacturing
and Manufacturing-Related ProgramsWorkshopFebr
uary 8-10, 2014Atlanta, Georgia
This material is based upon work supported by the
National Science Foundation under Grant No.
1304391
Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or
recommendations expressed in this material are
those of the author(s) and do not necessarily
reflect the views of the National Science
Foundation.
2
Project Summary
100 Hour Program to develop as emergent leaders
and begin to shape an organizational plan that
reflects innovation, inclusion of leadership
capacity in the curriculum and becomes a best
practice in the industry
3
INTRODUCTIONS
  • Name and organization
  • Expectation what do you hope to get from this
    workshop?

3
4
Three Day Workshop
  • Hands-on workshop with small group discussions
    and exercises
  • Self awareness as first step in leadership
  • Interpreting results of self assessments
  • Role play with engagement of others
  • Draft plan for steps going forward
  • Presentation on proposal development
  • Receive feedback from peers and instructors

4
5
Program Expectations
  • Commitment
  • Read all assigned references
  • Do all assignments
  • Implement daily practice
  • Be fully engaged with your own learning and
    growth
  • Be prepared to change yourself and your program
  • The most important thing to remember is this to
    be ready at any moment to give up what you are
    for what you might become.
  • W.E.B. DuBois

5
6
Workshop Expectations
  • Active participation in the workshop
  • Be open to new ideas
  • Collaborate with colleagues
  • Build a network
  • Identify resources to help
  • Learn to identify more ways to pursue
    opportunities (think differently)
  • Begin a journey a plan for yourself and for
    your organization
  • Satisfy, at least partially, your own objectives
    for being here

6
7
Program Objectives
  • Expand programs
  • Stimulate adoption of manufacturing curriculum
    aligned with
  • the Four Pillars of Manufacturing Knowledge
  • Adopt recommendations of ASEE Innovation with
    Impact
  • Build leadership capabilities
  • Prepare effective academic leaders
  • Create more educational innovation with
    significant impact on student learning and
    performance

8
Expected Outcomes
  • Understand what it means to be a leader
  • Insightful overview on ones personal and
    professional talents
  • Draft of individual plans for personal growth and
    leadership
  • First steps in building program expansion plan
  • An in-depth understanding of the Four Pillars
  • A clear understanding of resources and how to use
    them wisely

8
9
WORKSHOP AGENDA
  • Day 1
  • Morning Welcome, introductions and background
  • Afternoon Introduction to leadership, assessment
    results
  • Evening Networking exercise
  • Day 2
  • Morning Creation of personal leadership plan
  • Afternoon Creating a culture the Leaders role
  • Evening Creativity exercise for organizational
    plans
  • Day 3
  • Creation of the organizational plan case study
  • Share plans
  • Celebration of success

9
10
SOME POINTS ABOUT MANUFACTURING (Ron)
  • Economy
  • High standard of living
  • Image
  • Education

10
11
Some points about Manufacturing
  • 600,000
  • 82
  • 1.7 trillion
  • 12
  • 8
  • 9
  • Live like nobility
  • Hephaestus
  • Education

12
A Brief History
  • MER Forums and Summit
  • SME Task Force - 2009
  • Formation of SME Center for Education
  • Curricula 2015
  • The Four Pillars - 2011
  • Workforce Imperative A Manufacturing Education
    Strategy 2012
  • Concurrent national initiatives

13
  • Concurrent Initiatives
  • Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships 2011
  • A Plan to Revitalize American Manufacturing, The
    White House
  • Report to the President on Ensuring American
    Leadership in Advanced Manufacturing, Presidents
    Council of Advisors on Science and Technology,
    2011
  • A Report to the President on Capturing Domestic
    Competitive Advantage in Advanced Manufacturing,
    The Presidents Council of Advisors on Science
    and Technology, 2012
  • Creating the Manufacturing University, R.D.
    Atkinson, Brookings Institution
  • Why America Needs a National Network for
    Manufacturing Innovation
  • A third industrial revolution, Special report on
    Manufacturing and Innovation, The Economist, 2012

14
SME Workforce ImperativeA Manufacturing
Education Strategy
http//www.sme.org/WorkforceImperative/
15
Workforce Imperative
  • Attract more students into manufacturing
  • Articulate a standard core of manufacturing
    knowledge
  • Improve the consistency of manufacturing
    curricula
  • Integrate manufacturing topics into STEM
    education
  • Develop faculty that can deliver a world-class
    manufacturing education
  • Strategically deploy existing and new resources

16
FOUR PILLARS - NIAZ LATIF
16
17
Four Pillars
18
Four Pillars of Manufacturing Knowledge
  • A tool for describing the breadth of the field of
    Manufacturing Engineering
  • A curriculum development tool for educators in
    manufacturing-named programs
  • An aid to enhancing the manufacturing-related
    content in disciplines from which graduates often
    enter careers in the manufacturing function of
    product-producing industries

19
The Four Pillars of Manufacturing Knowledge
  • Developed by the Society of Manufacturing
    Engineers Center for Education
  • In collaboration with
  • SME Manufacturing Education Research Community
  • SME Certification Committee
  • National Center for Manufacturing Education
  • Initiated in January 2011
  • Rolled out to SME in June 2011
  • Included in SME study called Curricula 2015
  • Presentations to SME, ASEE, and others

20
(No Transcript)
21
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22
Bases for Four Pillars Model
  • ABET program criteria for manufacturing-named
    programs in engineering and engineering
    technology
  • Four Pillars terms
  • Materials and manufacturing processes
  • Product, tooling, and assembly engineering
  • Manufacturing systems and operations
  • Manufacturing competitiveness

23
Bases for Four Pillars Model
  • Body of Knowledge Certification criteria for
  • Manufacturing Engineer
  • Manufacturing Technologist
  • This industry-generated document provides the
    detailed list of topics needed by manufacturing
    professionals

24
Linkages to other disciplines
  • Manufacturing knowledge addresses
  • Need for knowledge about how things are made
  • Breadth of topics in the manufacturing field
  • Materials properties and how they are influenced
    by processing
  • Appropriate and alternative processes available
    for specific materials
  • Production planning and operations management
  • Quality management and sustainability issues

25
Connections to Materials Education
  • Materials Separate block in the graphic
  • Metals, Plastics/Polymers, Composites, Ceramics
  • Fluids, Glasses, Foams
  • Hybrids, Natural Materials
  • Nanotechnology
  • Manufacturing Processes
  • Most have direct connection to materials
    education
  • Material removal, Fabrication
  • Casting, Hot and cold forming, Molding
  • Heat treatment, Joining, Welding, Finishing
  • Bulk and continuous flow of materials

26
Connections to Mechanical, Electrical and
Product Design
  • Product Design
  • Mechanics of materials
  • Fluid mechanics, Heat transfer
  • Product design and Machine design
  • Materials selection and specifications
  • Design for manufacturing
  • Process Research and Development
  • Equipment/Tool Design
  • Fabrication and assembly

27
Connections to Industrial Field
  • Production System Design
  • Process planning and development
  • Process documentation
  • Equipment selection
  • Production system build test
  • Environmental protection
  • Waste management
  • Quality and Continuous Improvement
  • Quality standards
  • Inspection/test/validation
  • Design of experiments

28
CONCLUSION
  • The Four Pillars of Manufacturing Knowledge can
    help faculty members and their students in many
    Engineering and Engineering Technology fields to
    understand better the full breadth of the
    manufacturing field and how their special talents
    fit.

29
INNOVATION WITH IMPACT STEVE WENDEL AND RON
29
30
Innovation with Impact
http//www.asee.org/about-us/the-organization/advi
sory-committees/Innovation-with-Impact
31
Innovation with Impact
  • Career-long professional development of faculty
  • Expand collaborations and partnerships
  • Make engineering programs more engaging, relevant
    and welcoming
  • Increase, leverage, and diversify resources
  • Raise awareness of proven principles and
    effective practices of teaching, learning and
    educational innovation
  • Conduct periodic self-assessments within our
    individual institutions
  • Conduct periodic engineering community-wide
    self-assessments

32
IMPACT Recommendations
33
Challenges and Opportunities
34
Recommendations
  • Professional Development
  • Collaborations and Partnerships
  • Engaging, Relevant, Welcoming
  • Resources
  • Awareness
  • Self-Assessments Individual Institutions
  • Community-Wide Self Assessments

35
Professional Development
1. Value and expect career-long professional
development in teaching, learning, and education
innovation for engineering faculty and
administrators, beginning with pre-career
preparation for future faculty.
36
Connecting the Dots
37
Professional Development to Improve
38
Recommendations
  • Professional Development
  • 1.1 Assure that all graduates entering the
    professoriate are prepared to teach in informed
    and reflective ways.
  • Integrate pedagogy into doctoral programs
  • Include teaching apprenticeships and mentoring
  • Familiarity with educational courseware and
    tools.
  • Award a minor, certificate, or similar credential
    in engineering education.

39
Recommendations
  • Professional Development
  • 1.2 Incorporate similar opportunities into
    appointments for academia-bound postdoctoral
    students.

40
Recommendations
  • Professional Development
  • 1.3 Provide opportunities for some students to
    pursue studies in engineering education

41
Recommendations
  • Professional Development
  • 1.4 Ensure more faculty have contemporary
    engineering experience,
  • either before or during their academic career,
  • spin-in/spin-out semester/summer programs with
    industry or national labs,
  • bridge programs for longer sabbatical-style
    immersion,
  • professor of engineering practice.

42
Recommendations
  • Professional Development
  • 1.5 Make engineering education tools and
    resources an integral part of orientation/onboardi
    ng for new faculty

43
Recommendations
  • Professional Development
  • 1.6 Make career-long professional development an
    expectation for all faculty.

44
Recommendations
  • Professional Development
  • 1.7 Support, recognize, and reward faculty who
    participate in teaching/learning workshops.

45
Recommendations
  • Professional Development
  • 1.8 Partner with the graduate college to create
    future faculty development and certification
    programs.

46
Collaborations and Partnerships
2. Expand collaborations and partnerships between
engineering programs and (a) other disciplinary
programs germane to the education of engineers as
well as (b) other parts of the educational system
that support the pre-professional, professional,
and continuing education of engineers.
47
Engaging, Relevant, Welcoming
3. Continue current efforts to make engineering
programs more engaging and relevant and
especially expand efforts to make them more
welcoming.
48
Resources
4. Increase, leverage, and diversify resources
for engineering teaching, learning, and
educational innovation.
49
Resources Website Landing Page
50
Awareness
5. Raise awareness of the proven principles and
effective practices of teaching, learning, and
educational innovation and raise awareness of the
scholarship of engineering education.
51
Self-Assessment Individual Institutions
6. Conduct periodic self-assessments within our
individual institutions to measure progress in
implementing policies, practices, and
infrastructure in support of scholarly and
systematic innovationin-novation with impactin
engineering education.
52
Community-Wide Self Assessments
7. Conduct periodic engineering community-wide
self-assessments to measure progress in
implementing policies, practices, and
infrastructure in support of scholarly and
systematic innovationinnovation with impactin
engineering education.
53
Recommendations
  • Professional Development
  • Collaborations and Partnerships
  • Engaging, Relevant, Welcoming
  • Resources
  • Awareness
  • Self-Assessments Individual Institutions
  • Community-Wide Self Assessments

54
Exercise
  • Review the Innovation with Impact recommendations
    for Engineering Faculty, Chairs, and Deans.
  • In Groups
  • Determine which recommendations you agree with
  • Which recommendations could/should be modified
  • Prioritize agreed or modified recommendations
  • Measures

55
How will you achieve impact?
How will you know if you are successful?
56
Leadership Description
57
LUNCH
We must be the change we seek. Ghandi
58
LeadershipWhat is it?
  • Think of an admired leader in your life
  • What did that leader do to be so admired in your
    opinion?
  • How did that leader influence you?
  • What attributes did that leader demonstrate?

59

Definition of leadership
  • Leadership is an interpersonal influence process
    of setting direction and inspiring others to
    achieve goals.

60

Begin by knowing your authentic self

Becoming a leader is synonymous with becoming
ones real self. It is precisely that simple and
also just that difficult. Warren
Bennis
61

Context for Leadership
You
62
Leadership Attributes

Independent Competent Loyal
Supportive Mature Inspiring
Straightforward Forward-looking Cooperative
Dependable Fair-Minded Intelligent
Self-controlled Determined Caring
Broad-minded Courageous
Ambitious Honest

63

Kouzes Posner Most Admired Attributes
2010 1995 1987
Honest 85 88
83 Forward Looking 70
75 62 Inspiring 69
68 58 Competent 64
63 67
J. Kouzes and B. Posner
6
64

Leadership The Art of Possibility
  • Notice Bens Style of leadershiphow does it
    compare to yours?
  • What does leadership look like in this situation?
    How does that compare to your style or
    attributes?
  • What seems to be working well? Why?
  • What are the key attributes of leadership
    demonstrated?
  • What inspired you? Why?
  • How does Ben Rosamund impact their students?
    Their peers? Others?

65
Small Group Exercise
Who am I as a leader today? What is my style?
My attributes? How would people describe
me? What works well for me? What am I most
proud of? What do I want to enhance in terms of
my style or attributes?
66

An Integrated View of Leadership
Interior Collective How do we build strong relationships and influence others? Culture Exterior Collective How do we serve our stakeholders? Customers, Employees, Shareholders, etc.
Interior Individual Who am I as a leader? Self-Awareness Exterior Individual How do I behave as a leader? Competency

Adapted from TLC Community
67
From present to ideal
My present Situation
My vision for the IDEAL
The kind of leader I admire and want to
become My contribution in my contextual
framework to my University to the world My
legacy
Strengths/talents Who am I? Values,
passions AssessmentsEQ, MBTI Learning
Styles Assessing my beliefs
68
Shaping my development plan for the upcoming year
  • Key Elements
  • Careful thinking through todays present
    situationwho am I? Where am I? What am I
    yearning for?
  • Thinking about my ideal 2-3 years from now
  • What do I want to be doing? Where?
  • How will I be living into my legacy?
  • Identify my path forwardwhat are the milestones
    that will need to be part of my roadmap to get
    there?
  • Choose 1-2 goals for your development for this
    first yearwhat will be first big step be?

69
Strengths Based Concepts
  • Strengths Revolutiongetting each person to get
    clear about their strengths know how to
    leverage them
  • Put your strengths to work (20 report they play
    to their strengths
  • Too long weve wasted time and money trying to
    improve weaknesses
  • Gallup Poll34 strengths described

70

The Big Fiveour source of strength
  • Five strongest themes of talentmay not be your
    strength yet
  • These big five point to where you have the
    greatest potential for a strength
  • How do you interpret your talents?
  • Is there one you feel is most descriptive or
    dominant for you? Do you play from these? How
    so?
  • Think of combining this set of five with
    knowledge and skill to build your strength
  • Examplesthink of how they fit together

71
Honoring Each Others Talents
  • Tell us about your five most powerful themes.
    Were these a surprise for you? Or did you know
    them?
  • Are you playing to these talents today?
    Where/how do you have the opportunity to play to
    these talents?
  • Have you identified and nurtured your talents in
    the past?
  • How might you grow them into strengths? What
    would that take?
  • What actions might you take to better operate
    from your strengths? How will you do that? Who
    will support you?
  • How do you connect some of your experiences to
    your talents and/or strengths?

72
Key Assessments--Values
  • Strengths Finder develop and leverage his/her
    primary talents and strengths
  • Myers Briggs TYPE better understand oneself and
    others who are in their circle of influence
  • Kolb Learning Style better understand and
    utilize ones learning preferences for growth and
    development
  • Emotional Competence better understand and
    manage ones primary emotions and use them well
    in developing and sustaining relationships with
    others
  • Values Checklist provides a guide to acting
    authentically from a values-based position as a
    leader
  • Passions provides a guide for what turns me on
    and keep me feeling fully alive, providing
    meaning for my life

73
MBTIWhat is it?
  • A personality inventory, used as a tool
  • Developed by mother-daughter team
  • Based on C. J. Jungs theory of psychological
    type
  • It describesrather than prescribes
  • Identifies preferencesequally important,
    valuable and necessary
  • Is well documented in research over 50 yrs.
  • Has ongoing research to support its application

74
MBTI- How Used, by Whom?
  • Variety of users around globe
  • Small businesses large multinational
    corporations
  • Service industries and manufacturing
  • Consulting and training services
  • Established firms and new entrepreneurial
  • Education and health care
  • Helps people
  • to understand themselves and their behaviors
  • appreciate others to make constructive use of
    differences
  • approach problems in healthy ways, become more
    productive

75
Organizations use the MBTI to
  • Make the most of their human resources
  • Leverage individuals natural strengths
  • Improve teamwork
  • Understand and adapt to differences in
    leadership/mgt. style
  • Enhance effective communications
  • Assist in career development
  • Resolve conflict coach individuals
  • Design training activities develop skills

76

77
MBTI- Eight personality preferences
(four pairs)?TYPE
  • Energy
  • How a person is energized
  • Where you prefer to focus your attention
  • Extraversion(E)lt---------------------------?
    Introversion (I)
  • Preference for drawing energy Preference for
    drawing energy
  • from the outside world of people, from ones
    internal world of
  • activities and things ideas, emotions, and
    impressions

78
MBTI- Eight personality preferences (four pairs)

Perceiving
How you prefer to take in information Sensing
(S)?----------------------------------? Intuition
(N) Preference for taking in information Prefer
ence for taking in through the five senses and
noticing information through a what
is actual sixth sense and
noting what
might be
79
MBTI- Eight personality preferences (four pairs)
  • Deciding
  • How a person decides
  • Thinking (T)?-----------------------------?F
    eeling (F)
  • Preference for organizing and Preference
    for organizing and
  • structuring information to decide in a
    structuring information
  • logical, objective way decide in a
    personal, in a
    personal, values-oriented way

80
MBTI- Eight personality preferences (four pairs)
  • Living
  • How you deal with the outer world
  • Judging (J)?--------------------------------?Perce
    iving (P)
  • Preference for living a planned Preference
    for living a
  • and organized life
    spontaneous and flexible life

81
TYPE vocabulary
  • Extravert (E) Introvert (I)
  • external/exterior internal/interior
  • outside thrusts inside pull
  • talk thoughts out keep thoughts in
  • breadth depth
  • involved with people, things work with ideas,
    thoughts
  • interaction concentration
  • action reflection
  • do-think-do think-do-think

82
TYPE vocabulary
  • Sensing (S) Intuition (N)
  • present orientation future possibilities
  • what is real what could be
  • practical theoretical
  • facts inspirations
  • perfecting established skills learning new
    skills
  • utility novelty
  • step-by-step insight-by-insight
  • the five senses the sixth sense, a hunch

83
TYPE vocabulary
  • Thinking (T) Feeling (F)
  • logical system value system
  • head heart
  • objective subjective
  • justice mercy
  • critique compliment
  • principles harmony
  • reason empathy
  • firm but fair compassionate

84
TYPE vocabulary
  • Judging (J) Perceiving (P)
  • decide about information attend to/gather
    information
  • regulate flow
  • control adapt
  • settled tentative
  • run ones life let life happen
  • set goals seek options
  • closing off opening up
  • organized flexible

85
Effects of preference in work
  • Extraversion (E) Introversion (I)
  • - Like participating actively in a - Like
    quiet and private space
  • variety of tasks for concentration
  • - Are often impatient with long, - Tend to be
    comfortable working
  • slow jobs on one
    project for a long time
  • - Are interested in the activities of their
    - Are interested in the facts
    and/or
  • work and in how other people do them
    ideas behind their work
  • - Act quickly, sometimes without thinking -
    Like to think before they act,
  • sometimes to the
    point of not acting
  • - Find phone calls a welcome diversion
    - Find phone calls intrusive when
  • when working on a task concentrating on
    a task
  • - Develop ideas by discussing them -
    Develop ideas alone through
  • with others
    reflection
  • - Like having people around and working -
    Like working by themselves or
  • on teams occasionally in small groups

86
Effects of preference in work
  • Sensing (S) Intuition (N)
  • - Like using experience and standard -
    Like solving new, complex
  • ways to solve problems problems
  • - Enjoy applying skills already perfected
    - Enjoy the challenge of learning
  • something new
  • - Seldom make errors of fact, but may -
    Seldom ignore insights but may
  • ignore inspirations overlook facts
  • - Like to do things with a practical bent
    - Like to do things with an
    innovative bent
  • - Like to present details of their work first -
    Like to present an overview of
    their work first
  • - Prefer continuation of what is, with fine -
    Prefer change, sometimes radical,
  • tuning to continuation of what is
  • - Proceed step-by-step, accurately - Proceed in
    bursts of energy,
  • estimating the time needed following their
    inspirations as time
  • goes by

87
Effects of preference in work
  • Thinking (T) Feeling (F)
  • -Use logical analysis to reach -Use values to
    reach conclusions
  • -Can work without harmony, -Work best in
    harmony with others,
  • concentrating instead on the task
    concentrating on the people
  • -Upset people inadvertently by -Enjoy meeting
    peoples needs, even
  • overlooking their emotions in small matters
  • -Decide impersonally, sometimes -Let decisions
    be influenced by their
  • paying insufficient attention to peoples own
    and other peoples likes/dislikes
  • wishes
  • -Tend to be firm-minded and ready -Are
    sympathetic and dislike, even
  • to offer critiques avoid, telling people
    unpleasant thing
  • -Look at the principles involved -Look at the
    underlying values
  • -Want recognition after task -Want appreciation
    throughout the
  • requirements are met or exceeded process of
    working on a task

88
Effects of preference in work
  • Judging (J) Perceiving (P)
  • -Work best when they can plan -Want flexibility
    in their work
  • their work and work their plan
  • -Enjoy organizing and finishing tasks -Enjoy
    starting tasks and leaving
  • them open for last-minute changes
  • -Keep the focus on what needs to be -Want to
    include as much as possible
  • completed, ignoring other things that thus
    deferring needed tasks
  • -Feel more comfortable once a decision -Feel
    comfortable staying open to
  • has been made on a thing, situation
    or experiences, not wanting to miss
  • person anything
  • -Decide quickly in their desire for
    closure -Postpone decisions because of a
  • -Seek structure and schedules search for
    options
  • -Use lists to prompt action on specific -Adapt
    to changing situations and feel
  • tasks restricted with too much structure
  • -Use lists to remind them of possible
  • things to do when time allows

89
Mutual Usefulness of Opposite Types
  • Intuitive Types Sensing Types
  • Bring up pertinent facts Bring up new
    possibilities
  • Face the realities of the current
    situation Anticipate future trends
  • Apply experience to solving problems Apply
    insight to solving problems
  • Focus on what needs attention now Focus on
    long-term goals
  • __________________________________________________
    __________________________________________________
    _____________________________________
  • Feeling Types Thinking Types
  • Analyze consequences and implications Forecast
    how others will react feel
  • Hold consistently to a policy Make needed
    individual exceptions
  • Stand firm for important principles Stand firm
    on human-centered values
  • Create rational systems Organize people tasks
    harmoniously
  • Be fair Appreciate the thinking type
    along with everyone else

90
Your type?
  • Extravert vs. Intravert?
  • Sensing vs. iNtuition?
  • Thinking vs. Feeling?
  • Judging vs. Perceiving?

91
Integrating your assessment data
  • Notice the overlaps between your strengths
    description and your MBTI description
  • Where do you see likenesses and differences?
  • How do they complement one another?
  • What might this tell you about your leadership
    style?
  • How do you want to use these results as you
    prepare for your leadership development process?

92
PassionsSix core values
  • Personal Power or claiming oneself Identity,
    inner motivation, self-esteem, courage, a
    positive sense of self
  • Achievement, or proving oneself Reaching goals,
    working, winning, playing in organized sports,
    having ambition
  • Intimacy or sharing oneself Loving, bonding,
    caring, being intimate, making relationships
    work, feeling close, being a friend
  • Play and Creativity, or expressing oneself
    Being imaginative, intuitive, playful,
    spontaneous, expressive, humorous, curious
  • Search for Meaning, or integrating oneself
    Finding wholeness, unity, integrity, an inner
    connection to all things, trust in the flow of
    life
  • Compassion or Contribution, or giving of oneself
    Improving, helping, feeding, reforming, leaving
    the world a better place

93
DINNER
Far away there in the sunshine are my
highest aspirations. I may not reach them, but I
can look up and see their beauty, believe in
them, and try to follow where they lead.
94
Strengthsfinder results
95
Myers-Briggs results
96
DAY 1 EVENING
  • HANDS-ON SESSION
  • Form three groups
  • Each person in group identify one goal they would
    like to accomplish or make progress on by June
  • Everyone in group suggest ideas, resources,
    experiences that might be used to make progress
    toward the goal
  • Report on progress at June workshop

96
97
DAY 2 MORNING
  • What have we learned so far? Review pieces
  • Creation of YOUR personal leadership development
    plan
  • Break
  • Coaching one another
  • Personal change gt organizational change
  • Lunch

97
98
What Have I Learned Thus Far?
What have I learned about myself that was
validating and affirming? What has surprised
me? What do I know to be true about myself?
What am I most proud of? How have others
experienced me?
99
Millam, 2013
100
Creation of my Strategic Leadership Development
Plan
  • Creating my vision for the future
  • What is my vision
  • -as a leader?
  • -as a leader in my organization?
  • -as a leader in my community, family?
  • What do I want to create?
  • -my ideal
  • -my dream

101
  • Coaching One Another
  • Help your partner to clarify whats really
    important for his/her vision?
  • What difference is s/he making for themselves,
    their spheres of influence?
  • What will be different because of their
    leadership?
  • What might be a realistic time frame?
  • What will it take for this to become reality?
  • Who will be supporting this leader? How?
  • What about their stakeholders? Who are they?
    What can they contribute?

102
Personal Change -gt Organizational Change
  • What is the present situationwhat needs to
    change? What will be different in my
    organization?
  • What readiness is there?
  • Who might be design team members with me to
    realize the change?
  • Who are the best stakeholders to support me as
    the leader of this process? How do I know?
  • How will I recruit those design team members?
  • How will we engage with them to articulate a
    vision for what we want to happen?
  • How do ensure I the right representation across
    the organization?
  • What are the opportunities and the challenges?
  • How do you propose to inspire your design team
    and others?

102
103
  • New PossibilitiesVisionary Ideals
  • Growth in students based on
  • Curriculum change that is exciting to students
    (Curricula 2015)
  • Innovative Additions
  • Culture Change that reflects
  • Innovation Excitement
  • Collaboration New possibilities
  • Industry speaksPartnerships with Industry
  • New learning designs
  • Experiential
  • Leadership creation
  • Raised expectations
  • Innovations
  • Partnerships with other colleges

104
LUNCH!! Anyone who has never made a mistake
has never tried anything new. - Albert Einstein
105
DAY 2 AFTERNOON
  • Creating the culture a leaders role (EM)
  • Incorporating Innovation with Impact (RB,
    Steve)
  • Review and summary of what is evolving (EM)
  • Ongoing assessment and continuous improvement

105
106
Creating the Culture A Leaders Role
  • What is culture anyway?
  • Assessing your culture? How to assess?
  • Describe your culturecritical elements
  • What would your ideal culture look like?
  • A story of culture changeElaine/Ron
  • The Leaders Rolefrom their perspectives
  • Small Group Exercise

107
The Leaders Role
  • Undergo a comprehensive assessment about present
    state, readiness, and possible needs/wants
  • Ask a whole lot of questionsseek peoples ideas
    at the front end, imagining what are the bests
    in to incorporate
  • Communicate, communicate, communicate
  • Share stories of success with initial pieces of
    change
  • Enroll and engage cross-functional teams to take
    action
  • Set up mechanisms for everyone to hear about
    progress
  • Be willing at any moment to take in new ideas!

108
Innovation with Impact
  • Career-long professional development of faculty
  • Expand collaborations and partnerships
  • Make engineering programs more engaging, relevant
    and welcoming
  • Increase, leverage, and diversify resources
  • Raise awareness of proven principles and
    effective practices of teaching, learning and
    educational innovation
  • Conduct periodic self-assessments within our
    individual institutions
  • Conduct periodic engineering community-wide
    self-assessments

109
Select the extent to which you agree with each
statement as it relates to your program/department
110
Select the extent to which you agree with each
statement as it relates to your program/department
111
Pedagogies
112
Collaboration
113
Needed Resources
114
Opportunities and Challenges
OPPORTUNITIES CHALLENGES
Combine advanced manufacturing lecture and machine shop Not enough time for innovation
Collaborations with engineering programs and local industry Scaling and differentiation??
Collaborative thinking Budget and time constraints
More industry partnerships Faculty limited perception of their role
Leadership Development Program State mandated requirements
Delivery of courses by distance learning Funding for manufacturing laboratory
Low student enrollment
Lack of wow factor
Getting everyone on same page
114
115
50 Reasons Not To Change
  • Continuous Improvement

We don't have the staff They're too
entrenched Thats yesterdays news We're waiting
for guidance Another dept tried that We're doing
OK as it is They really don't want it We don't
have the equipment We've never done it before It
will never fly upstairs I don't have the
authority We don't have consensus Weve always
did it this way That's someone else's job
There's not enough time We can't take the chance
There's no clear mandate
  • It can't be done
  • It's not my job
  • No one asked me
  • Its impossible
  • It won't work here
  • I dont like it
  • Its too visionary
  • Its too radical
  • Its not my problem
  • I'm all for it, but . . .
  • We tried that before
  • It's against tradition
  • This is just a fad
  • It's hopeless
  • It won't fly
  • It's too political
  • It's too ambitious

What's in it for me It needs more study People
will talk It will take too long It's too
complicated They won't fund it Yea, when pigs
fly It's contrary to policy Its not in the
budget My boss wont like it It needs more
thought The jurys still out Do it somewhere else
It's too expensive We'll catch flak for it Sam
said . . .
116
Moving from Resistance to Change to Wholehearted
Commitment
  • Strategic Thinkers
  • Adversarial Thinkers
  • Generate resistance to change out of
    self-protective view of life
  • Analyze the world from a whats wrong
    perspective
  • Are restricted by weaknesses
  • Are possessive and get oriented
  • Hesitate to support new ideas
  • Concentrate on fixing problems
  • Prefer proven technologies
  • Conserve limited emotional energy
  • Bureaucratically cling to the past
  • Rely strictly on rules and logic
  • Are prone to procrastinate
  • Are motivated by fear will-power
  • Are security and image oriented
  • Use structure for protection
  • Work to avoid mistakes
  • Resist making changes
  • Are task/problem oriented
  • Generate wholehearted commitment out of a
    self-responsibility view of life
  • Analyze the world from a whats right
    perspective
  • Capitalize on strengths
  • Are expansive and give oriented
  • Take risks encourage innovation
  • Develop new opportunities
  • Innovate in a changing environment
  • Generate surplus emotional energy
  • Strategically create the future
  • Use intuition with skill confidence
  • Are eager to initiate
  • Are motivated by a purpose
  • Are growth and results oriented
  • Use structure to support progress
  • Work to achieve results
  • Search for better alternatives
  • Are process/goal oriented

117
The Innovative University
  • American universities rose to pre-eminence
    embracing innovation
  • Universities have three goals
  • Discover and disseminate new knowledge
  • Memory recall achievements and failures from the
    past
  • Mentoring the rising generation
  • Students are the primary constituent
  • Tie goals to the mission
  • Limit programs focus, be yourself. Chose what
    NOT to do
  • Metrics measure what is important, not what is
    easy

117
118
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119
DAY 2 EVENING
  • HANDS-ON SESSION
  • Group by institution
  • Rethink curriculum
  • What could go wrong in making changes?
  • How will you overcome obstacles?
  • How will you engage all stakeholders?
  • What is in it for them?

119
120
DAY 3
  • Morning (led by EM)
  • Action learning process
  • Creation of the Organizational Plan
  • Case study of a best practice (Niaz, other Pis)
  • Getting organizational investment
  • Making it happen
  • Beginning steps outlined by groups
  • Lunch
  • Afternoon
  • Finalizing of both plans
  • Share personal plans with group
  • Mentors/mentees
  • Finalize plans for action learning process
  • Celebration of Success

120
121
2013-14 Cohort
Case Study Best Practices
Aco Sikoski Mohammad Zahraee Niaz Latif
122
Case Study(to be moderated by Niaz)(3 min.)
  • Introduction
  • Formation of 3 groups
  • members from 2-yr and 4-year institution
  • Process
  • Scenario 1

123
Process(1 min)
  • Each group will discuss the given topic ( 15
    min.)
  • Leader of the group will summarize the discussion
    (2 min.)
  • Facilitator will discuss our experience (10
    min.)
  • Questions from participants (5min)

124
OUR CASE(brief background to be given by
Niaz)(2 min.)What caused need for change or
innovation?
  • Workforce need
  • Program growth
  • Curriculum change
  • 2-yr and 4-yr partnership

125
What did we accomplish?(3 min.)
  • An advanced manufacturing related curriculum that
    resulted in first BS in Mechatronics Engineering
    Technology program in the USA,
  • First ETAC accredited program
  • Program growth 2 students to 61 students in 4
    years
  • Two NSF grant One USDOL grant
  • One endowed Center for Packaging machinery
    Industry
  • Two industry supported mechatronics laboratory
    (one endowed)
  • Cash gift to establish the Center of
    manufacturing excellence Competitiveness

126
Topic 1. Building Trust and Partnership 27
min.(group discussion 10 min summary by leader
2 min our experience 5 min QA 10 min.)
  • Our Experience (5 min.)
  • Mutual respect and trust between the
    participating institutions at all levels
  • Open, ongoing dialogue between faculties and
    administrators
  • Common objectives, strategies, and advertising
  • Ongoing efforts to refine and align course
    offerings
  • Coordinated programs and activities, including
    joint projects and cultural activities
  • Visible presence of partners on each others
    campuses

127
Topic 2. Challenges/Obstacles related to Change/
Innovation 27 min. (group discussion 10 min
summary by leader 2 min our experience 5 min
QA 10 min.)
  • Our experience (Zahraee)
  • Transfer of Modules to Credit Hours
  • Setting equivalency of courses at three
    institutions
  • Mapping modules to courses
  • College credits for module-based courses
  • Faculty Resourcing
  • Cohort selection among 3 institutions
  • Instructional Delivery among institutional
    partners

128
Topic 3. What needs to be focused on? 27 min.
(group discussion 10 min summary by leader 2
min our experience 5 min QA 10 min.)
  • Our experience (Niaz) Things that we focused on
  • Continuous communication with key industry
    partners
  • Faculty/administrators cooperation among 3
    institutions
  • Continuous Publicity among stakeholders
  • Legislators,
  • State agencies
  • Area Schools
  • Professional Organizations at National level

129
Topic 4. Tangential benefits? Our experience 5
min QA 10 min.
  • Our experience (Zahraee)
  • Endowment
  • Internships/Employment
  • More external grants
  • Regional economic development
  • Industry Projects

130
Scenario 1
Total time 30 min
Assume that you would like to realign your
present manufacturing or manufacturing related
curriculum with the SMEs Four Pillars of
manufacturing knowledge. EAC, ETAC criteria are
aligned with Four Pillars of manufacturing
Knowledge.
131
Scenario 1
  • Who are the stakeholders?
  • How would you form the team?
  • Who would be your key industry partners?
  • How would you establish partnership with
    industry?
  • What is your objective related to curriculum?
  • What would be your need and/ justification for
    curricular change?

132
(No Transcript)
133
The Power behind ACTION LEARNING
  • Real Learning, Real Results
  • A systematic approach focused primarily on the
    dynamics of the leaders role and environment
  • Asking powerful questions
  • What? How? Why? Where? Who? When?
  • Skillful inquiry, assuming there are many answers
    to be considered--right questions at the right
    time
  • Flexibility
  • Tailored to the unique needs, goals and culture
    of an organization
  • Built on Many Disciplines
  • Adult learning, systems theory, psychology,
    organizational behavior, management sciences

134
Setting up your Action Learning Team
  • Identify the team members for your process
  • Speak with each of them prior to gaining their
    commitment
  • Help them truly understand their team
    responsibilities
  • Scope the timetable for producing a realistic set
    of goals, objectives and a action time table
  • Start the team process with asking the right
    questions
  • What are we trying to do? Why?
  • What is stopping us from doing it?
  • What might we be able to do about it?
  • Who cares about it?
  • Who can do anything about it?
  • Where can we locate helpful resources
  • Keep the team opening to divergent ideas,
    problems, solutions
  • Keep the exploration going for some time with
    more questions
  • Once the team has scanned every possible idea,
    then move to convergence
  • Keep stakeholders informed of your process,
    gaining inputs
  • Track the learning
  • Use your mentors/coaches for guidance

135
END
  • Assign mentors
  • Set up April conference call
  • Questions

135
136
Moving from Resistance to Change to Wholehearted
Commitment
  • Strategic Thinkers
  • Adversarial Thinkers
  • Generate resistance to change out of
    self-protective view of life
  • Analyze the world from a whats wrong
    perspective
  • Are restricted by weaknesses
  • Are possessive and get oriented
  • Hesitate to support new ideas
  • Concentrate on fixing problems
  • Prefer proven technologies
  • Conserve limited emotional energy
  • Bureaucratically cling to the past
  • Rely strictly on rules and logic
  • Are prone to procrastinate
  • Are motivated by fear will-power
  • Are security and image oriented
  • Use structure for protection
  • Work to avoid mistakes
  • Resist making changes
  • Are task/problem oriented
  • Generate wholehearted commitment out of a
    self-responsibility view of life
  • Analyze the world from a whats right
    perspective
  • Capitalize on strengths
  • Are expansive and give oriented
  • Take risks encourage innovation
  • Develop new opportunities
  • Innovate in a changing environment
  • Generate surplus emotional energy
  • Strategically create the future
  • Use intuition with skill confidence
  • Are eager to initiate
  • Are motivated by a purpose
  • Are growth and results oriented
  • Use structure to support progress
  • Work to achieve results
  • Search for better alternatives
  • Are process/goal oriented
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