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TRAINING CHUNKS

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Title: Slide 1 Author: Candice Hazelwood Last modified by: Heidi Kerchenski Created Date: 8/26/2011 12:55:11 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show (4:3) – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: TRAINING CHUNKS


1
TRAINING CHUNKS
  • Collective Leading through Collaboration
  • Integrated Comprehensive Services
  • Instructional Framework
  • Assessment

2
Going Deeper with TBTs and the Ohio 5-Step Process
Getting Results Impacting Each Student within
All Students

Going Deeper with TBTs and the Ohio 5-Step
Process
2011-2012 SPDG Professional Development
3
Leadership
  • BUILDING CAPACITY
  • for LEADERS
  • to IMPLEMENT
  • and SUPPORT TBTs

4
Training Outcomes
  • To Build Leadership Capacity for Implementing and
    Supporting TBTs by
  • Collective Leading through Collaboration
  • Instructional Framework
  • Assessment
  • Monitoring and Supporting TBT Work

5
Leadership
  • Every person who enters the field of education
    has both an opportunity and an obligation to be
    a leader.
  • Dufour and Marzano 2011

6
5 Step Process
5 Step Process
7
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8
OIP Implementation Rubric CRITERIA
  • Section A Effective
    Teams
  • SECTION B DISTRICT/BUILDING/COMMUNITY SCHOOL
    LEADERSHIP TEAMS
  • Section c
    Teacher-Based Teams

9
The Ohio 5-Step Process A Cycle of Inquiry
10
From The Collaborative Administrator. 2008.
Permanent Havens of Excellence Westover
(p. 244).
  • In education, we want solutions that are exotic
    and easy, but in reality the answers are simple
    and hard to do.
  • -

11
LEADERSHIP
  • COLLABORATION
  • IS
  • CRITICAL

12
Teacher Based Teams and Leadership
  • The primary purpose of Teacher Based Teams is to
    improve student learning. Data teams (TBTs)
    improve student learning by improving teaching
    and leadership.
  • Laura Besser , Data Teams, the Big Picture. 2010,
    p. 2

13
Improvement Is a Team Sport
  • You cant do it alone. Leadership is
    not a solo act its a team
    performance. the winning strategies
    will be based upon the we not I philosophy.
    Collaboration is a social imperative.
  • DuFour and Marzano 2011

14
  • Weve yet to find a single instance in which one
    talented person accounted for most, let
    alone 100 percent, of the success.
  • DuFour and Marzano 2011

15
TBTs, BLT, and DLT Provide the Framework
  • If school and district leaders are to create the
    conditions that help more students succeed at
    learning at higher levels, they must build the
    capacity of educators to function as members of
    high-performing collaborative teams.
  • DuFour and Marzano 2011

16
New Standards Include Collaboration at Every
Grade Level
  • SL.K.1 Participate in collaborative conversations
    with diverse partners about kindergarten topics
    and texts with peers and adults in small and
    large groups.
  • Follow agreed upon rules for discussion (e.g.,
    listening to others and taking turns speaking to
    others about the topics and texts under
    discussion).

17
Teaching Children How to Collaborate Requires
  • SL.4.1 Engage effectively in a range of
    collaborative discussions (one- on- one, in
    groups, teacher led) with diverse partners on
    Grade 4 topics and texts, building on others
    ideas and expressing their own clearly.

18
Requires the Adults to Know How to Collaborate
  • SL.8.1. Engage effectively in a range of
    collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,
    and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8
    topics, texts, and issues, building on others
    ideas and expressing their own clearly.

19
Collaboration in All Grade Levels
  • SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively
    in a range of collaborative discussions
    (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with
    diverse partners on grades 1112 topics, texts,
    and issues, building on others ideas and
    expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

20
Collective Leadership
  • Collective leadership has a stronger influence on
    student learning than any
    individual source
    of leadership.
  • Seashore Louise et. al 2010

21
Collaborative Inquiry
  • Collaborative inquiry is among the most
    promising strategies for strengthening teaching
    and learning.
  • The biggest risk, however, is not providing the
    necessary leadership and support.
  • David, J. L., 2008/2009

22
Integrated Services
  • How Are We Doing Serving All Students?

23
Gaps in Reading
24
Gaps in Math
25
CLOSING THE GAP
  • 40 Point Performance Gaps Unacceptable
  • Raise Expectations

26
Lets Start with a Look at How We Got to This
Point
27
This Section Is Taken from the Work of
  • Dr. Elise M. Frattura, Associate Professor at the
    University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Department
    of Exceptional Education and Educational
    Administration, and Associate Dean for the School
    of Education.
  • She works with districts across the country to
    assist administrators and teachers in developing
    proactive comprehensive services organizational
    structures to better meet the individual needs
    for all learners

28
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29
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30
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31
Targeted Interventions 20 Tier
2 School-Wide Interventions 80 Tier 1
Gifted and Talented Programs
Programs for Students with ADHD
Programs for At-Risk Middle School Students
Title 1 Programs

Special Ed5-10 Tier 3
Special Education Programs
Programs for Teenage Parents
Programs for Nonreaders at the Third Grade
Limited English Speaking Programs
At- Risk Program for HS Students
Programs for Students under Section 504
Early Childhood Programs
Guidance Programs
Programs for Homeless Children
Alcohol and Drug Programs
32
A Program Model Has Not Worked
  • Students are helped after they fail
  • Separated from core of teaching and learning
  • Overlooks individual needs fits student to
    program.
  • Students may be separated from peers either from
    classroom or attending a different school
  • Fragments students day by moving locations
  • Require students to be labeled to get help
  • Frattura 2011

33
How and Where Are Your Students Supported?
  • When a student struggles in your school
    (academically, socially, emotionally) list all
    of the programs, practices, interventions that
    are in place to respond to that student.
  • Then list what is in place to prevent student
    struggle in the first place.
  • Frattura, 2011 pg21

34
Now Compare the Two Lists
  • Is the Prevention List Shorter?
  • Why?
  • What is not working?
  • What are the challenges with this model?

35
Integrated Comprehensive Services
  • An Integrated Comprehensive Service (ICS)
    Delivery Model is a model that organizes
  • professional staff by the needs of each learner
    instead of clustering learners by label.
  • (Capper and Frattura, in press).

36
So How Do We Make Sense of All This?
37
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38
Integrated Comprehensive Services for All
Learners
39
What Does Integrated Comprehensive Services
Mean?
  • Integrated
  • are those settings that all students,
    regardless of label, access throughout their day
    in school and nonschool environments.
  • Comprehensive Services
  • are the array of academic and behavioral
    services brought to a student in a comprehensive
    manner

40
The Bottom Line about ICS
  • It is about building teacher capacity and
    expertise so that students may be part of the
    norm group of diverse learners.
  • It is about educating each and every learner and
    building the capacity so that each and every
    school may honor any child who belongs.

41
The Bottom Line about ICS
  • It is about developing flexible learning groups
    throughout each day for each child based on who
    they are and how they learn (whether it is 11,
    small group, or large group instruction).
  • It is about reallocating staff to better meet the
    needs proactively of each and every learner.

42
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43
Shift from Traditional Program to Services Chart
  • With no discussion, review the chart and
    individually highlight at three ah-has
  • Designate a time keeper.
  • Each person then has one minute to share out
    highlighted ah-has in round-robin format.
  • As a team, discuss what individual sharing points
    resonate the most for you as a district/building

44
Consider This
  • Programs are When Children are Sent to the Adults
  • Services are When Adults Come to the Children
  • Frattura 2011

45
  • What we know
  • Varied achievement
  • Within student groupings
  • Positively impacts
  • Student achievement
  • Or the students who
  • Are isolated the most
  • Often are the furthest behind
  • Hnushek, E.,Klin, J., Markman, M., Rivkin, S.
    (2003)
  • Does Peer Ability affect student achievement?
  • Journal of Applied Econometrics

46
  • The First Intervention Must Be the Right
    Intervention Using Universal Design
  • Reducing the need to go somewhere else
  • to get their academic needs met

47
  • If we continue to pullout for instruction and
    intensive intervention
  • We will NEVER develop
  • the Capacity of ALL Teachers
  • Resulting in More and MORE Segregation
  • As we have not shared our own EXPERTISE

48
That Being Said
  • Is it Possible to Deconstruct Programs to
    Reconstruct Services?
  • Frattura 2011

49
  • Are We a Learning Organization?

50
Setting the Stage for District Vision
  • Source of student failure is the system hence,
    the system needs to accommodate the student.
  • Primary goal of education is to prevent student
    failure through a service delivery model versus a
    deficit based program model.

51
IMAGINE THE POSSIBILITIES.
  • All staff are expected to teach all students.
  • All staff are considered to be experts in the
    knowledge and skills to teach a range of student
    needs.
  • All staff should be expert in teaching reading.
  • All staff support all students with and without
    labels in flexible learning communities.

52
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53
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54
Shift from Traditional Program to Services
Continuum
  • Assign two recorders one for the continuum
    responses and one to chart discussion points.
  • As a district/building team, rate yourselves on
    each component of the continuum.
  • As you discuss, chart any assumptions, structures
    and/or behaviors that may be inhibiting related
    changes in your district/building.

55
LOCATION DEFINES SERVICES
  • No classes or courses are set-aside for lower
    track or higher track students.
  • Students who need the most structure and
    consistent learning environment are not asked to
    leave the classroom to attend a pullout program
  • All support staff are aligned cross
    categorically by grade level or academy

56
A WAY TO BEGIN TO INTEGRATE SERVICES
  • Align special education teachers to the current
    general education structure within the school,
    including TBTs (i.e., grade levels, cluster grade
    levels, academies, etc).
  • Determine how many students you have in each unit
    (grade, academy, department, etc) that has needs.
  • Delineate how many staff you have available to
    realign to a new structure.
  • Expect the sharing of expertise through capacity
    building and staff development
  • Frattura, 2011

57
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58
Traditional Roles to Integrated
Comprehensive Services Chart
  • Take out HO
  • Individually and without discussion, review the
    role(s) that most impact you.
  • In a triad compare the role of traditional to
    integrated.
  • Have you had experience working with a broad
    range of students? Describe that experience.
  • What are the pros and cons of this shift?

59
What Can YOU Do?
  • What concrete steps can your TBT/BLT/DLT take to
    move your district toward a system of fully
    integrated services?

60
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61
LEADERSHIP
  • FOCUSING on EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTION

62
Effective Leaders Create a Common Language
  • Dufour and Marzano 2011

63
  • The relationship between a students
    understanding of key vocabulary terms and his or
    her academic achievement has been well
    established in research...
  • The same principle applies to those attempting to
    lead the (improvement) process.
  • Dufour and Marzano. 2011.Leaders of
    Learning (pp. 34-35)

64
Common Language Activity
  1. Take out Handout 6 Exchange Between Principal
    and Superintendent (Dufour and Marzano. 2011.
    Leaders of Learning)
  2. Read individually and highlight any terms that
    would require a shared understanding between the
    two speakers.
  3. In triads, share out your highlighted terms.
  4. As a triad, choose one term and together develop
    a definition for the term.
  5. At your table, discuss how a common language can
    be established in your district/building.

65
Leaders who develop a common language do not
settle for a superficial use of key terms.
  • Instead, they drill deeper to ensure there
    is understanding behind each term.
  • DuFour and Marzano. 2011. Leaders of Learning
    (p.34)

66
What Steps Should Your District Take to Ensure
TBTs Have a Common Understanding of Important
Terms in Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment?
  • What Are Your Personal Responsibilities in
    Helping to Ensure These Common Understandings?

Model Curricula
Unpacking Standards
Common Formative Assessment
Benchmark Assessment
Formative Instruction
Integrated Comprehensive Services
Differentiated Instruction
67
  • Leading the Implementation of Effective
    Instructional Practices

68
  • Always start with all kids.

69
The Ohio 5-Step Process A Cycle of Inquiry
70
WHAT IS CORE INSTRUCTION?
  • Take one minute to write a definition or
    description of CORE INSTRUCTION.
  • Find someone you dont know at another table.
  • After introducing yourself, exchange your version
    of CORE INSTRUCTION.

71
CORE INSTRUCTION 75-85 OF ALL STUDENTS
72
FOCUS ON THE CORE
5 Step TBT Process
73
Core Instructional Decision Making
  • Use scientific, evidence-based strategies
  • Ensure curriculum and instructional approaches
    have a high probability of success for most
    students (75-85)
  • Deliver instructional approaches with fidelity
  • Use instructional time efficiently and
    effectively
  • Instructional Decision Making in Core Instruction
    (2008).Iowa City Schools

74
Core Instructional Decision Making
  • Use available resources to teach ALL students
  • Believe that all students can learn
    irrespective of disability, race, primary
    language and/or socioeconomic status
  • Shift thinking from the student to the
    instruction
  • Instead of placing the student under the
    microscope, examine the learning environment
  • from Instructional Decision Making in Core
    Instruction (2008).Iowa City Schools

75
Core Instructional Decision Making
  • Use a multi-tier model of service delivery
  • All students receive instruction in the core
    curriculum supported by supplemental and
    intensive interventions when needed
  • Each tier represents increasingly intensive
    levels of services associated with increasing
    levels of learner needs
  • from Instructional Decision Making in Core
    Instruction (2008).Iowa City Schools

76
Core Instructional Decision Making
  • General education teachers use tools to monitor
    students performance and progress against
    grade-level standards
  • Monitor progress frequently
  • Utilize (formative) assessments that can be
    administered quickly
  • Utilize assessments that are sensitive to small
    changes in student performance
  • from Instructional Decision Making in Core
    Instruction (2008).Iowa City Schools

77
Quick Check for Understanding LINKS
  • Stand at your table and determine who has the
    fewest years in education.
  • This person chooses one statement from the Core
    Instructional Decision making slides, and shares
    how this links to TBT work.
  • Person to the right repeats this process using a
    different statement.
  • Continue until everyone has become a link in
    the learning .

78
Factors that Increase the Power of Core
Instruction
  • More instructional time
  • Smaller instructional groups
  • More precisely targeted instruction at the
    students level
  • Clearer and more detailed explanations (more
    explicit instruction)
  • More systematic instructional sequences
  • More extensive opportunities for guided practice
  • More opportunities for error correction and
    feedback

(Torgesen, 2006)
79
Examples of Instructional FrameworksBrian
McNulty
80
RESEARCH-BASED INSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORKS
  1. Take out HO Instructional Framework chart
  2. With a partner from another table, highlight the
    common elements found in the chart examples.
  3. Take out HO Practices That Lead to
    Achievement What Are They? by Alison Olzendam
  4. Individually highlight Instructional Framework
    components as you read.
  5. With partner, complete the last column on the
    Instructional Framework chart.

81
  • Now Review Characteristics of a Traditional
    Instructional Framework vs. Daggetts Instruction
    Framework Model

82
TRADITIONAL FRAMEWORK DAGGETT SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTION
What Teachers Should Do What the Entire System Should Do
Teacher Focused   Student Focused
Teachers Deliver Instruction   Teachers Facilitate Learning
Vision Set by Top Leaders   Vision is Built More Inclusively
Define Vision in terms of Academic Measure   Define Vision as Strong Academics and Personal Skills and the Ability to Apply Them
Rigid Structures Support Adult Needs   Flexible Structures Support Student Needs
Focus on Teaching Focus on Learning
83
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85
Team Reflection Check
  • Discuss the following with your district/building
    team
  • How do the draft standards of the Ohio Teacher
    Evaluation System compare with current
    instructional expectations in your district?
  • Is there a framework of instructional practices
    that all educators use?
  • With your district/building team, discuss how
    instruction is currently supported and monitored
    through TBT work in your district.

86
Instructional Framework
  • Districts have to work together to define and
    agree on what HIGH
    QUALITY INSTRUCTION means by doing the
    following
  • Reviewing the research on effective instruction
  • 2. Developing their own list of effective
    practices
  • McNulty, 2011

87
START WITH YOUR STRENGTHS HONOR WHAT YOU
ALREADY HAVE
88
District Springboards Can Be Used
as Starting Points
  • Does your district have a research-based Balanced
    Literacy Framework that has never been
    instituted?
  • Are you a SIG building or Race to the Top
    District that has purchased an instructional
    program?
  • Have you incorporated specific instructional
    expectations into your evaluation instrument?
  • Has your district had training in effective
    instructional strategies?

89
  • Take three minutes to discuss with your team what
    starting points you may already have to use in
    the development of a framework of instructional
    practices for ALL teachers in your
    district.

90
Develop A List of Effective Practices
  • Identify consistently high performing teachers
  • Pair DLT and BLT members to co-observe 3
    identified teachers 2 times each
  • Specifically describe what the teachers are doing
    and what the students are doing
  • Make a draft list (individually and collectively)
    of high quality instructional practices
  • Organize practices into an instructional
    framework
  • (Ex Use Gagnes Framework to organize)
  • 6. DLT and BLTs work together to refine and
    communicate list McNulty, 2011

91
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92
Shared responsibility. Teachers equally
responsible for all aspects of classroom.
Teachers feed off of each others energy.
Ping-ponging or effective transition between
teachers.
Bell to bell instruction. Effective use of all
instructional time due to good organization and
preparation.
BCS Best Co-Teachers
Differentiated instruction to meet the needs of
all students.
93
DISTRICT INSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORK ACTIVITY
  • Take out Handouts Dekalb School District
    Instructional Framework packet and Ohio Model
    Curricula Template
  • Assign each table member one subject area to
    review, making sure all core subjects are read
  • Using HO Research-based Instructional
    Framework chart, determine how many of the
    charted components are found in Dekalbs IF.
  • Discuss your findings with your table.

94
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95
Model Curriculum Template
Content Elaborations
Instructional Strategies and Resources
Expectations for Learning
Content Specific Sections
96
  • What child in your building/classroom
    comes to mind?

97
Universal Design for Learning
  • One framework, included in Federal Law and
    supported by ODE, is that of
    Universal Design for Learning.
  • UDL components should be included when
    developing your instructional framework.

98
??
  • The basic premise within Universal Design for
    Learning is that flexibility in curriculum must
    be available to accommodate the diverse
    differences in student learners. Thus, the UDL
    framework encompasses three overarching
    principles that aim to minimize barriers and
    maximize learning.

99
Meeting the Needs of ALL
Learners
100
VIDEO UDL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICEfrom the UDL
Centerfeaturing Dr. David Rose
101
Universal Design
  • The word "universal" does NOT mean there is a
    single solution that works for everyone.
  • There is no one size fits all -- alternatives
    are provided as needed.
  • All learners needs are considered in lesson
    design from the beginning.
  • Universal Design casts a broad net around
  • all learners based on how students learn.

102
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103
START WITH YOUR STRENGTHS HONOR WHAT YOU
ALREADY HAVE
104
  • OVERCOMING the EFFECTS of the DIGITAL AGE
    on TODAYS LEARNERS

105
  • IMPACT OF DIGITAL AGE ON STUDENTS
  • Impacts decision-making

    Less able to appreciate how personal decisions
    affect others
  • Lack of abstract thinking
    Due to stunted
    frontal lobe growth
  • Self-absorbed Stunted development of frontal
    lobe impairs social and reasoning abilities
  • Less able to complete long or more tedious tasks
    or projects Need for immediate mental
    gratification
  • Hinders development of adequate brain circuitry
  • - Cannot recognize anothers emotions
  • - Lack of empathy
  • - More prone to selfish acts From Nancy
    Brewer, Engaging the Disengaged Student in the
    Digital Age, 2011 Ohio Special Ed Leadership
    Conference

106
RECOMMENDATIONS for DELIVERING INSTRUCTION for
STUDENTS in the DIGITAL AGE
  • Eliminate lengthy lessons-change topics
    frequently and make use of all technology.
  • Do not present material in only one modality.
  • Allow projects to involve creativity of video,
    electronic tools, digital media, etc.
  • Do not limit projects to one format, as todays
    learners are content creators.
  • Generation believes in product over process.
    Give them assignment and set them free to
    complete.
  • Generation thrives on feedback and constant
    positive reinforcement.
  • More concrete examples before abstract thinking
    can develop.
  • CHOICES, CHOICES, CHOICES!
  • -Larry Rosen, Ph.D. Rewired ( 2010)

107
OIPIR CHECK
  • Take out HO 1 OIPIR RUBRIC again.
  • Take a few minutes with your team to check where
    your TBTs are INSTRUCTIONALLY relative to the
    following sections of the OIPIR Rubric
  • C -15, C 16, C 17 (Steps 3-4-5 of the TBT
    Section)

108
Assessment
109
Assessment to Instruction
  • When teachers implement an instructional
    framework, they use assessment information to
    make instructional decisions.
  • Frey and Fisher 2011

110
Origin
  • The word assessment is derived from the Latin
    word assidere, which means to sit beside.

111
  • The Assessment Process in a Teacher Based
    Team(PLC) is not simply to Prove What a
    Student Has Learned but to IMPROVE that
    Learning.
  • DuFour and Marzano 2011 p140

112
A Districts Informative Assessment System Should
Include
113

The Data Coachs Guide Love, Stiles, Mundry
DiRanna, c. 2008
114
The Direction Ohios Going
The Direction Ohio is Going with a New Generation
of Assessments
115
Ohios New Generation of Assessments
116
Assessment Timeline
State Board Adopted Standards June, 2010
  • Development Phase
  • Test development
  • Field testing
  • Standards setting
  • 2012 - 2014

State Board Adopted Model Curriculum March, 2011
First Assessment Administration 2014-2015
2011
2012
2015
2013
2014
117
College and Career Ready
  • By 2014, 100 of Ohios classrooms will implement
    a more rigorous college- and career-ready
    curriculum that, together with aligned
    assessments and teacher supports, will form the
    foundation of a comprehensive system to empower
    Ohios students to succeed globally in the 21st
    century. 

118
Are Ohio Students Ready for College?
ACT, The Conditions of College Career
Readiness, Class of 2011 Ohio.
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122

The Data Coachs Guide Love, Stiles, Mundry
DiRanna, c. 2008
123
Leading Assessment Practices to Help Teacher
Based Teams
  • If the Potential for Formative Assessment is to
    be Realized, Students, Teachers, and
    Administrators must Undergo a Conceptual Shift
  • DuFour and Marzano p119

124
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT IN THE TBT PROCESS
  • TBT assessments serve as a diagnostic tool for
    teachers and allow teams to analyze student
    performance, set goals, and determine the most
    effective strategies for instructional
    intervention
  • McNulty and Besser 2011 p. 130 - 134

125
ONGOING CYCLE OF ASSESSMENTS IN TBTS
  • Assessment 1 Pre instruction assessment is
    administered before instruction administered.
  • Assessment 2 A post instruction assessment is
    administered after teachers have used agreed upon
    instructional strategies.
  • McNulty and Besser 2011

126
Ongoing Cycle of Assessments in TBTs
  • Assessment 3 If goals were not met in the
    previous cycle, continue the assessment process
    by administering another assessment on student
    understanding of concepts and skills.
  • Assessment 4 A formative assessment is
    administered to measure student learning .
  • McNulty and Besser 2011

127
Developing an Informative Assessment System
  • Overarching Question
  • Do teachers and administrators get the
    information they need as a result of the
    assessments currently in use?
  •  

128
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129
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130
Analysis of Current Assessment System
  • Take out HO 7 Analysis of Current Assessment
    System Protocol and
  • HO 8 Chart
  • Follow the directions on the Protocol.

131
MONITORING AND SUPPORT OF TBTs
  • Central Office Effectiveness and Change
  • Monitoring of BLTs and TBTs
  • High Quality Professional Development

132
MONITORING and SUPPORT of TBT WORK
133
  • Excellent schools in poor districts implode over
    time
  • whereas, poor schools in excellent districts get
    better.
  • - Lambert (p. 235). The Collaborative
    Administrator (2008)

134
A Framework for Excellence The Role of the
Central Office
  • Only through revitalizing and redirecting the
    action of district-level operations can the kind
    of widespread and radical change that must occur
    be possible.
  • - Schlechty (p. 235). The Collaborative
    Administrator (2008)

135
  • Effective District Leaders Monitor the TBT
    Process in Each School as They Develop the
    Capacity of Principals to Lead the Process.
  • Dufour and Marzano 2011

136
FACILITATORS OF CHANGE
  • District administrators are often the
    facilitators of changethe leaders of growth for
    everyone but themselves.
  • Capper and Frattura, 2009

137
Intervention for BLTs and
TBTs
  • District Leadership Teams are not
    giving a lot of feedback to Building Leadership
    Teams and Building Leadership Teams are NOT
    giving a lot of feedback to Teacher Based Teams.
  • McNulty 2011

138
MONITORING BLTs and TBTs
  • Do you know which BLTs are not performing
    efficiently and effectively?
    How does your system know?
    What is being done to help those who need
    intervention?
  • Do you know which TBTs are not performing
    efficiently and effectively?
    How does your system know?
    What is being done to help those who need
    intervention?

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TBT Monitoring
  • Take out HO Ohio 5-Step Process Implementation
    Rubric and HO TBT Feedback Guide.
  • With your team, use these two documents to chart
    next steps to monitor TBT/Ohio 5-Step Process
    implementation across the district, considering
    the following
  • How does our district leadership use student
    results to monitor the effectiveness of TBT work?
  • How does our building leadership use student
    results to monitor the effectiveness of TBT work?
  • How do our TBTs use student results to monitor
    the effectiveness of their own work?

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Providing Feedback in the Data Team Process
  • Reeves (2006) says that it is an absolute
    waste of time if you gather information on adult
    practices and student learning and then fail to
    act on it.
  • Besser and McNulty 2011

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Ensuring an Effective Adult Implementation
Monitoring System
  • Connect look fors to district instructional
    framework to provide common language/
    understanding of what is expected of every
    teacher
  • Ensure that look fors provide viable data for
    OIP Plan Adult Behavior Indicators.
  • Coordinate a vertical alignment of look fors
    that are grade/subject appropriate but still
    provide appropriate Adult Indicator data.
  • Short-term formative monitoring should be
    reflective of instructional strategies determined
    in Steps 3 and 4 of the Ohio 5-Step Process.

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Monitoring
  • Traditionally, monitoring has focused only on
    student performance. In OIP Stage 3, monitoring
    includes focusing on adult implementation, as
    well.
  • What barriers is your district experiencing when
    monitoring adult implementation?
  • What steps have been taken to eliminate the
    barriers?
  • How do you know that what the adults are doing is
    directly affecting what the students are
    learning?

143
Results in the TBT ProcessPublic Monitoring
  • TBTs need venues to share the results of their
    hard work, because the results are what will
    sustain the momentum.
  • Data Walls and Data Halls A visual display of
    results of teaching, learning, and, indirectly,
    of leadership
  • Effect data student achievement results
  • Cause data strategies of adults
  • McNulty and Besser, 2011

144
Results in the TBT ProcessPublic Monitoring
  • Data Boards Science fair for grown ups. The
    primary purpose is to spark educational dialogue.
  • Data Fairs Schools and districts celebrate
    student achievement gains as a result of
    teacher and leadership practices.
  • McNulty and Besser, 2011

145
  • DIFFERENTIATED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT for TBTs
    IS CRITICAL to CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

146
HIGH QUALITY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
  • What is it?Process and activities designed to
    enhance the professional knowledge skills and
    attitudes of educators so that they might improve
    the learning of students.
  • Why is it important?Professional development
    should not be separate from ones day to day
    professional responsibilities. Rather,
    professional development is an ongoing activity
    integrated into the job of each educators
    professional life.
  • http//www.k12.wa.us/RTI/CorePrinciples/ProfDev.as
    px (2011)

147
Doug Reeves identifies the most influential force
on teacher learning to be advice from colleagues
(2008)
148
TBTs as a Professional Development Model
  • The TBT process is an explicit, teacher-driven,
    ongoing, job-embedded, data-driven PD that is
    highly effective.
  • McNulty and Besser, 2011

149
Coaching and TBTs A Complimentary Fit
  • Coaching can take many forms, from formal
    agreements to informal networks of individuals
    who use coaching skills to support each other.
  • Allison, E. Data Teams the Big Picture, 2010 p.
    202

150
Coaching Skills
  • TBT members who want to use coaching skills to
    partner in thought with another individual or
    team must master a few basics
  • Listening
  • Understanding
  • Questioning in a way that provokes thought and
    possibility
  • Calling for action and resonating hope
  • Allison, E. Data Teams the Big Picture, 2010 p.
    202

151
The Powerful Coaching Conversation Process
  • Take out HO 12
    The Powerful Coaching Conversation
  • All successful coaching approaches use a
    conversation that includes these basic steps.
  • Allison, E. Data Teams the Big Picture, 2010
    p. 202

152
The Coaching Leader
  • Leaders who coach others discover a wonderful
    secret
  • The more you coach, the more you lead! And every
    time you help coach another you actively develop
    leadership in others which deepens the collective
    capacity to do more.
  • Allison, E. Data Teams the Big Picture, 2010
    p. 202

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Considerations for Differentiated Professional
Development in Your District/Building
  • Who currently coordinates your district/building
    professional development?
  • On what basis/data are PD/trainings determined?
  • What communication system is in place to ensure
    TBTs receive the differentiated HQPD they need?
  • What changes may need made at the central office
    level to ensure differentiated HQPD is provided
    in a timely manner?
  • What monitoring system/tools are used to
    determine PD effectiveness?

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LEADING TBTs with INTEGRITY
  • Pay attention to research.
  • Look in the mirror. Share the mirror with all
    teachers and administrators.
  • Model the cultural shift in your district and/or
    building.
  • Be in the room.
  • Force the focus.
  • Celebrate and move forward.

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References and Resources
  • Capper, C. A., Frattura, E. M., (2009). Meeting
    the Needs of Students of ALL Abilities, How
    Leaders Go Beyond Inclusion. Corwin Press.
  • DuFour, R., Marzano, R. J., (2011) Leaders of
    Learning, How District, School, and Classroom
    Leaders Improve Student Achievement. Bloomington,
    IN Solution Tree Press.
  • Erkens, C., Ferriter, W., Heflebower, T., Hierck,
    T., Hinman, C., Huff, S., Jakicic, C., King, D.,
    Rose, A., Vagle, N. Weichel, M. (2009) The
    Principal As Assessment Leader. Bloomington, IN
    Solution Tree Press.
  • Frey, N., Fisher, D., (2011) The Formative
    Assessment Action Plan, Practical Steps to More
    Successful and Learning. Alexandria, VA. ASCD.
  • McNulty, Brian A. , Besser, L. (2011) Leaders
    Make It Happen, An Administrators Guide to Data
    Teams. Englewood, CO., Lead and Learn Press.

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