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Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

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Title: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts


1
Common Core State Standards forEnglish Language
Arts Literacy in History/Social Studies,
Science and Technical SubjectsMarcia
BarnhartAssistant DirectorOffice of Curriculum
and AssessmentThe Ohio Department of Education
2
Session Objectives
  • To develop an understanding of the Literacy
    Standards as found in the Common Core State
    Standards for ELA
  • To explore ways to implement the Literacy
    Standards across content areas

3
Questions about the Literacy Standards
  • What are the literacy standards?
  • Why do we need literacy standards?
  • Where are they located?
  • Who is responsible for teaching them?
  • How can teachers implement them?

4
What are the Literacy Standards?
  • Standards for reading and writing in
  • Science
  • Social Studies
  • History
  • Other Technical Subjects

5
What does Other Technical Subjects mean?
  • A course devoted to a practical study, such as
    engineering, technology, design, business, or
    other workforce-related subject a technical
    aspect of a wider field of study, such as art or
    music. (CCSS Glossary)

6
To what grade levels do the Literacy Standards
apply?
  • Grades 6 - 12

7
Why not grades K 5?
  • The Literacy Standards are predicated on the
    assumption that K-5 teachers already teach
    reading and writing across content areas.

8
What do the writers of the CCSS tell us about the
Literacy Standards?
  • Short video David Coleman
  • www.youtube.com/user/TheHuntInstitute

9
Why literacy standards?
  • Do students have difficulty building content
    knowledge from content area reading assignments?
  • Do students struggle with completing writing
    assignments for content area assignments?
  • Do certain types of assignments require specific
    types of writing?
  • (e.g, lab report)

10
Define College and Career Ready
  • Demonstrate independence
  • Comprehend evaluate complex texts
  • Construct effective arguments
  • Convey intricate multifaceted information
  • Discern a speakers key points
  • Ask relevant questions

11
In Addition
  • Build strong content knowledge
  • Respond to the demands of audience, task,
    purpose, discipline
  • Comprehend as well as critique
  • Value evidence
  • Use technology digital media strategically
  • Understand other perspectives cultures

12
An Integrated Model of Literacy We acquire
knowledge and thinking skills best when we learn
them reciprocally, when we are asked to read,
write, argue, and problem solve as we engage with
text and with an organized body of essential
knowledge  Mike Schmoker Focus Elevating
the Essentials to Radically Improve Student
Learning ASCD 2011
13
Which is most effective?(re test scores
college/career success)
  • Laptops for all/Smartboards in every classroom
  • Common, content-rich curriculum
  • All commercial math/literacy programs
  • Differentiated instruction
  • Cold calling (and other checks for
    understanding)
  • Various small/school-within-a-school Academies
  • 90-120 minutes of purposeful reading writing
    per day
  • Turnaround strategies (new faculty school
    design,etc.)
  • Cognitive/concept mapping graphic representations

14
Which is most effective?(re test scores
college/career success)
  • Laptops for all/Smartboards in every classroom
  • Common, content-rich curriculum
  • All commercial math/literacy programs
  • Differentiated instruction
  • Cold calling (and other checks for
    understanding)
  • Various small/school-within-a-school Academies
  • 90-120 minutes of purposeful reading writing
    per day
  • Turnaround strategies (new faculty school
    design,etc.)
  • Cognitive/concept mapping graphic representations

15
Guaranteed Viable Curriculum
  • Number one factor (Marzano)
  • Content-rich curriculum learned primarily
    through purposeful reading/writing (Hirsch
    D.Willingham David Liben)
  • viable curriculum more time for reading,
    writing, talking about contentgains in reading,
    college preparation

16
Curriculum Literacy
  • CURRICULUM CONTENT learned via reading, writing,
    discussion in these modes
  • Draw inferences and conclusions
  • Analyze conflicting source documents
  • Solve complex problems with no obvious answer
  • Support ARGUMENTS with evidence
  • Multiple 3-5 page papers far more books,
    articles, essays
  • College Knowledge by David Conley

17
Authentic Literacy
  • Literacy is the spine that holds everything
    together in all subject areas.
  • Phillips Wong, Gates Foundation

18
Writing How Important?
  • There are no silver bullets in education.
    Butnon-fiction writing is about as close as you
    can get to a single strategy that has significant
    effects in nearly every area of curriculum.
  • Doug Reeves

19
Writing How important?
  • If we could institute only one change to make
    students more college ready, it should be to
    increase the amount and quality of writing
    students are expected to produce.
  • David Conley
  • College Knowledge

20
  • Just as students must learn to read, write,
    speak, listen, and use language effectively in a
    variety of content areas, so too must the
    Standards specify the literacy skills and
    understandings required for college and career
    readiness in multiple disciplines
  • Introduction to CCSS, p.3

21
Where are the Literacy Standards located?
  • The Literacy Standards for History/Social
    Studies, Science and Technical Subjects follow
    the K-12 Common Core Standards for ELA (pp.
    59-66)
  • www.corestandards.org
  • (Select the tab The Standards at the top of the
    page.)

22
Standards for English Language ArtsLiteracy
in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical
Subjects
23
Organization of the Document
The document is organized into three main sections The document is organized into three main sections The document is organized into three main sections
Standards for English Language Arts Grades K 5 Standards for English Language Arts Grades 6 12 Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects Grades 6 12
pp. 9-33 pp. 34-58 pp. 59-66
24
This division reflects the unique, time-honored
place of ELA teachers in developing students
literacy skills while at the same time
recognizing that teachers in other areas must
have a role in this development as well.
(Introduction to the CCSS, p. 4)
25
Organization of the Literacy Standards
The Literacy Standards are organized into three main sections The Literacy Standards are organized into three main sections The Literacy Standards are organized into three main sections
Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Standards for Science and Technical Subjects Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects
Page 61 Page 62 Pages 64-66
26
Grade-specific standards for Literacy in
History/Social Studies grades 6-12
Grade-specific standards distinctly identify what
students should learn in each grade band.
27
Grade-specific standards for Literacy in Science
and Technical Subjects 6-12
Same concept as History/SS--different skills
28
Unlike the Reading Standards, there is no
division within the subjects.
29
Who is responsible for teaching the Literacy
Standards?
  • The Standards insist that instruction in
    reading, writing, speaking, listening, and
    language be a shared responsibility within the
    school.
  • (Introduction to the CCSS, p. 4)

30
  • Literacy standards for grade 6 and above are
    predicated on teachers of ELA, history/social
    studies, science, and technical subjects using
    their content area expertise to help students
    meet the particular challenge of reading,
    writing, speaking, listening, and language in
    their respective fields.
  • (Introduction to CCSS, p.3)

31
(No Transcript)
32
Three Big Ideas
  • 1. Literacy is everyones job.
  • 2. Students must read complex texts
  • independently and proficiently in every
    discipline.
  • 3. Students must write argumentative and
    explanatory texts in every discipline (process
    writing and on-demand writing.

33
Literacy Template for All Content Areas
  • Teach vocabulary provides background for the
    text.
  • Model critical reading/underlining/annotating
  • Students individually annotate 1-3 paragraphs
  • Pair/share annotations..as teacher continuously
    checking for understanding

34
Template continued
  • 3. Repeat steps above until reading is complete.
  • 4. Discuss in pairs/small groups/as a class.
  • 5. WRITE short/long scored..or not.

35
Implications for Core Disciplines
  • Social Studies/History
  • Science
  • Mathematics
  • English Language Arts

36
Social Studies/History Curriculum
  • Literacy is the key word the teaching of
    history should have reading and writing at its
    core.
  • Sam Winesburg
  • Social Studies Professor, Stanford University
  • We would add speaking.

37
SS/History Curriculum
  • 1.Select common readings from textbooks,
    historical/primary/current documents.
  • 2. Generate questions/tasks (writing) to argue,
    infer, resolve conflicting texts, problem solve.
    (College Knowledge)
  • 3.Assessments 50 writing/essay format

38
Science Curriculum
  • Being science literate entails being able to
    read and understand a variety of science texts to
    form valid conclusions and participate in
    meaningful conversations about science.
  • National Research Council

39
Science Curriculum
  • 1.Select common readings from textbooks and
    science articles.
  • 2. Teach/Model (i.e. think aloud)
  • -in class reading/note-taking
  • -discussion/debate/write to explainargueresolv
    eproblem-solve (College Knowledge)
  • 3. Assessments 50 writing

40
Math Read, Write, Talk
  • I can no longer imagine teaching math without
    making writing an integral aspect of students
    learning.
  • Marilyn Burns
  • Founder Math Solutions Professional Development

41
Mathematics Curriculum
  • Math teachers need to focus on the interplay of
    numbers and words, on expressing quantitative
    relationships in meaningful sentences. To make
    mathematics meaningful, all three Rs must be well
    blended in each students mind.
  • Lynn Steen
  • Mathematics Professor, St. Olaf College

42
Mathematics Curriculum
  • Identify opportunities to explain, apply, solve
    open-ended/extended response problems orally and
    in writing.
  • Select readings from math text, data sets, and/or
    relevant articles. Have students write about
    them.
  • Teach every lesson with frequent think/pair/share
    and checks for understanding (Burns)

43
Math Read, Write, Talk
  • READ Teach/model close reading of math
    textbook/word problems (Shanahans)
  • WRITE (from Marilyn Burns)
  • -I think that the answer is _____.
  • -I think this because _____.
  • -I figured this out by _____.
  • DISCUSS in pairs a whole class.

44
ELA Curriculum
  • 1.Select common readings (literary and
    informational) and establish writing assignments.
  • 2.Generate questions/tasks to argue, infer,
    resolve conflicting texts, problem solve.
    (College Knowledge)
  • 3.Teach/Model HOW TO
  • -underline/annotate, cite explain supporting
    text
  • -participate in Socratic discussions

45
Next Steps
  • Engage students in nonfiction text
  • Build students speaking and listening skills
  • Incorporate vocabulary strategies
  • Increase the quantity and quality of nonfiction
    writing in all contents
  • Score student papers

46
Resources
  • Mike Schmoker
  • Results Now (2006)
  • Focus (2011)
  • David Conley
  • College Knowledge (2008)
  • Douglas Reeves
  • The Leadership and Learning Center

47
Imagine..
  • all students, regardless of socioeconomic
    circumstance, having spent most of their class
    time in English, social studies, and other
    courses closely and carefully reading, rereading,
    discussing, and writing about the ideas in
    various texts.

48
Imagine
  • every student graduating from high school having
    analyzed and imitated excellent examples of adult
    writing and having written countless close
    literary analyses, essays, grant proposals,
    business plans, and position papers on multiple
    political, scientific, and cultural controversies
    ---

49
  • after carefully reading and discussing two or
    more conflicting documents or innumerable
    engaging issues.
  • It would shatter achievement records, reduce
    dropouts, and ensure college readiness and
    graduation rates at levels never achieved.

50
  • We have 13 years to accomplish this goal.

51
Questions?
Marcia Barnhart Office (614) 387-2195 MarciaBarnh
art_at_ode.state.oh.us
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