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Title: The Department of Biological Sciences


1
The Department ofBiological Sciences
Wednesday 3rd September 2008 Presenter Dr.
Stephen Reid
2
What is required to obtain a degree?
  • Complete 20 credits (40 courses) 5 courses per
    semester
  • Complete the requirements for either
  • 1 Specialist Program or
  • 2 Major programs or
  • 1 Major 2 Minor Programs
  • Earn a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at
    least 1.6
  • (equivalent to a C minus or 60-62)

3
Programs in Biological Sciences
  1. Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist
  2. Conservation Biology Specialist
  3. Human Biology Specialist
  4. Integrative Biology Specialist
  5. Integrative Biology Major
  6. Biology Minor
  7. Cell and Molecular Biology Co-op
  8. Conservation Biology Co-op
  9. Neuroscience Joint Program with Psychology
  10. Paramedicine Joint Program with Centennial
    College
  11. Industrial Microbiology Joint Program with
    Centennial College

4
First Year Courses
Integrative Biology Major
1. Introductory Biology Part 1 2. Introductory
Biology Part 2 3. Introductory Chemistry Part
1 4. Introductory Chemistry Part 2 5. Six
additional courses
Program Supervisor Dr. Kamini Persaud
5
First Year Courses
Integrative Biology Specialist
1. Introductory Biology Part 1 2. Introductory
Biology Part 2 3. Introductory Chemistry Part
1 4. Introductory Chemistry Part 2 5. Calculus
Part 1 6. Calculus Part 2 7. Introduction to
Physics Part 1 5. Three additional courses
Program Supervisor Dr. Kamini Persaud
There are two calculus streamsone for students
who have taken high school calculus and one for
students who have not taken high school calculus.
6
First Year Courses
Conservation Biology Specialist / Co-op
1. Introductory Biology Part 1 2. Introductory
Biology Part 2 3. Introductory Chemistry Part
1 4. Introductory Chemistry Part 2 5.
Introduction to Planet Earth 6. The Geography of
Global Processes 7. Geographic Information
Systems 5. Three additional courses
Program Supervisor Dr. Lisa Manne
7
First Year Courses
Cell Molecular Biology Specialist / Co-op
1. Introductory Biology Part 1 2. Introductory
Biology Part 2 3. Introductory Chemistry Part
1 4. Introductory Chemistry Part 2 5. Calculus
Part 1 6. Calculus Part 2 7. Introduction to
Physics Part 1 5. Three additional courses
Program Supervisor Dr. Clare Hasenkampf
There are two calculus streamsone for students
who have taken high school calculus and one for
students who have not taken high school calculus.
8
First Year Courses
Human Biology Specialist
1. Introductory Biology Part 1 2. Introductory
Biology Part 2 3. Introductory Chemistry Part
1 4. Introductory Chemistry Part 2 5. Calculus
Part 1 6. Calculus Part 2 7. Introduction to
Physics Part 1 8. Introduction to Physics Part
2 9. Introduction to Physiology Part 1 10.
Introduction to Physiology Part 2
Program Supervisor Dr. Kamini Persaud
There are two calculus streamsone for students
who have taken high school calculus and one for
students who have not taken high school calculus.
9
Second Year Courses
All biology programs contain a core of six
coursesthat everyone must take.
  1. Cell Biology
  2. Molecular Aspects of Genetic Processes
  3. Mammalian (Human) Physiology I
  4. Plant Physiology
  5. Ecology
  6. Evolutionary Biology
  7. A physiology or anatomy or cell biology or
    ecology lab course

10
Third Fourth Year Courses
Students begin true specialization in their third year.Some of our third and fourth year courses include Students begin true specialization in their third year.Some of our third and fourth year courses include
Biochemistry (Proteins and Enzymes) Biochemistry (Metabolism) Practical Approaches to Biochemistry Molecular Endocrinology Mammalian (Human) Physiology II Comparative Environmental Physiology Pathologies of the Nervous System Animal Developmental Biology Microbiology The Bacterial Cell Seminars in Cellular Microbiology Vertebrate Histology (Cells and Tissues) Vertebrate Histology (Organs) Animal Behaviour Evolutionary Biology of Insects Marine Biology Animal Communication Molecular Aspects of Plant Development Genetics Genomics Molecular Biology Lab (Cloning) Molecular Biology Lab (Nucleic Acids) Special Topics in Molecular Genetics Consequences of Global Change Advanced Population Ecology Restoration Ecology Role of Zoos in Conservation Conservation Biology Environmental Toxicology Biology of Plant Stress River Ecology Directed Research in Biology I Directed Research in Biology II
11
Programs in Biological Sciences
Entry requirements after First Year
  • Complete (pass) 4 credits (8 courses) which must
    include
  • Introductory Biology Part I
  • Introductory Biology Part 2
  • Introductory Chemistry Part 1
  • Introductory Chemistry Part 2
  • One course in mathematics or statistics
  • 2) A cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at
    least 2.0 (C average)
  • Some programs are highly competitive and may
    require a higher CGPA for entry.

12
Applying to a Biology Program
  • There are two subject post (program) application
    periods per year
  • 1) Early April to early May.
  • 2) Early July to early August.
  • Go on to your ROSI (Repository of Student
    Information) account and select
  • the subject post that identifies the program
    of study that you wish to pursue
  • (you may select more than one subject post).
  • Admission decisions are announced in mid-June and
    mid-September.

Follow this link for information and instruction.
13
Pre-Requisites, Co-Requisites and Exclusions
  • A pre-requisite must be taken before you can
    take the course in question.
  • A co-requisite must be taken before or at the
    same time.
  • You cannot take, for credit, a course for which
    you have taken an exclusion.

BGYB10H3 Cell Biology This course is designed to
introduce theory and modern experimental
techniques in cell biology. Emphasis will be on
eukaryotic cells. Structure and function of
major animal and plant organelles will be
covered. Subsequent topics include the role
of the cytoskeleton. Exclusion BGYB10Y,
BIO250Y Prerequisite BGYA01H BGYA02H
CHMA10H CHMA11H
You cannot take BGYB10H if you have taken these
courses
Must be taken prior to taking BGYB10H
14
Physics and Biology Programs
I want to enter a biology program that
requires physics but I didnt take grade 12
physics. What can I do?
  • In this case you can take PHYA01H (Basic
    Physics).
  • This course is intended for students who did
    not take
  • grade 12 physics. It is worth 0.5 credit.
  • You can take this course in your first semester
    (fall 2008).
  • You can then take PHYA10H in the spring 2009
    semester.
  • PHYA22H can then be taken in the summer or at a
    later date
  • (this course is required in the human biology
    program).

15
Taking Courses at the Other U of T Campuses
  • You may take up to 5.0 credits of courses in the
    other Arts and
  • Science Divisions at the Univ. of Toronto (St.
    George UTM).
  • No more than 1.0 of your first 4.0 credits may
    be taken at the
  • other two campuses.
  • Students are responsible for confirming (by
    looking at the UTSC
  • calendar) whether or not a course at another
    campus is an
  • exclusion to a UTSC course that has already
    been taken.
  • You need permission from your program supervisor
    to replace a
  • UTSC program requirement with a course from
    another campus.

16
Summer Courses
  • Summer courses were initially established so
    that co-op
  • students could complete their degree in four
    years.
  • Summer courses are useful if you have failed or
    dropped a
  • course that you need as a pre-requisite to
    courses the
  • following year.
  • Not all courses are offered in the summer.
    Consult the
  • course calendar and/or your program supervisor
    if you are
  • planning on putting off a course until the
    summer.
  • Medical schools do count summer courses but they
    dont like
  • students using them to lighten their course
    loads in the fall
  • and winter semesters.

17
Components of a Course
  • Depending upon the particular course, the
    following are
  • general course components
  • Lectures (usually 2 hours per week).
  • Laboratory/practical sessions (3 hours every week
    or every
  • second week).
  • Tutorials (the role of tutorials differ in
    different courses).

, Lecture etiquette is very important. You
should not talk as this disturbs other
students. Cell phones ringers must be turned off
and phones must not be answered.
18
How will I be evaluated?
  • Depending upon the particular course, the
    following are
  • used as evaluation tools
  • Midterm examination (1 or 2 per course).
  • Final examination (1 per course).
  • Lab reports (in courses with lab sections).
  • Quizzes.
  • Written assignments or oral presentations.

University rules prohibit the presence of
cell phones in an exam.
make sure that you are familiar with the
universitys rules on plagiarism.
19
How will I be evaluated?
  • You are assigned a mark (percentage) in each
    course.
  • This percentage is then converted to a letter
    grade.
  • The letter grade is then converted to a grade
    point value.
  • Grade point values are then used to calculate
    your
  • grade point average (GPA).

20
How will I be evaluated?
Percentage 90-100 85-89 80-84 77-79 73-76 70-72 67
-69 63-66 60-62 57-59 53-56 50-52 0-49
Letter Grade A A A- B B B- C C C- D D D- F
Grade Point Value 4.0 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0
1.7 1.3 1.0 0.7 1.0
Definition Excellent Excellent Excellent Good Good
Good Adequate Adequate Adequate Marginal Marginal
Marginal Wholly Inadequate
21
Who are my course instructors?
  • Tenured or tenure-track faculty (Assistant
    Professors
  • Associate Professors and Full Professors) who
    are all
  • active researchers.
  • Full-time lecturers (teach but do not do
    research)
  • Sessional lecturers (replacement instructors
    hired when
  • a regular course instructor is on leave).
  • Teaching assistants (Masters or PhD students
    occasionally
  • a fourth year undergraduate student)

22
What does a university professor do?
  • 40 Research
  • 40 Teaching (one course per semester
    supervising
  • graduate and undergraduate research students).
  • 20 Administration
  • Every faculty member in the Department of
    Biological
  • Sciences runs an externally-funded research
    program.
  • Research lab personnel include graduate (MSc and
    PhD
  • students undergraduate thesis students
    post-doctoral
  • fellows and technicians).

23
Communicating with your Professors
  • Different professors like to communicate in
    different ways.
  • Every professor holds designated office hours
    each week
  • which time students may drop by to ask
    questions or seek
  • advice.
  • Short questions are easily asked via e-mail.
    Questions that
  • require long answers or explanations should be
    asked in person.
  • Most professors do not like to receive phone
    calls as multiple
  • calls can be highly disruptive.
  • E-mails must NOT be sent in text-message format.
    Such
  • messages will be deleted and not answered.

24
Where do I go for advice or to solve problems?
In first year you should consult the Pre-Program
coordinator, Sean Ramrattan.
  • Once you are in a biology program (major or
    specialist) you should consultwith the Program
    Supervisor.
  • Integrative Biology Dr. Kamini Persaud
    kpersaud_at_utsc.utoronto.ca
  • Cell Molecular Biology Dr. Clare Hasenkampf
    hasenkampf_at_utsc.utoronto.ca
  • Human Biology Dr. Kamini Persaud kpersaud_at_utsc.
    utoronto.ca
  • Conservation Biology Dr. Lisa Manne
    manne_at_utsc.utoronto.ca
  • Paramedicine Dr. Stephen Reid
    sgreid_at_utsc.utoronto.ca
  • Industrial Microbiology Dr. Roberta Fulthorpe
    fulthorpe_at_utsc.utoronto.ca

Program supervisors will give advice on course
selection, course sequences, replacement courses
and any other program-related concern).
25
What happens when I have met all the requirements
for my degree?
  • If you are registered in, or have already
    successfully completed
  • the correct number of credits for the Degree
    Post you are
  • registered in then you must signal your intent
    to graduate.
  • Information is available on the Registrars web
    site.

Follow this link for information and instruction.
26
The People of the Department
  • Departmental Chair Dr. Greg Vanleberghe
  • Associate Chair for Research Dr. Dan Riggs
  • Associate Chair for Undergraduate Affairs Dr.
    Stephen Reid
  • 20 tenured or tenure-track faculty members
  • 5 emeritus professors 2 full-time lecturers
  • Dozens of graduate students and other research
    personnel
  • 4 administrative staff members
  • Nella Semoff, Secretary to the Chair Lucy
    Pickering, Administrative Officer
  • Gloria Luza, Clerical Assistant Tony Rupnaraine,
    Business Officer
  • 5 teaching technicians Nankie Bissoon, Alex Yi,
    Patrick Ng, Joanne Pearce Sheila Rush
  • 5 technical staff
  • M. Agoston greenhouse A. Gristock
    vivarium Y. Ma, R. Or Centre for the
    Neurobiology of Stress A. Ranieri -
    Wash/Sterilisation

28
27
Research Clusters
  1. Biological Dynamics of Environmental Change
  2. Neurobiology of Stress
  3. Integrative Behaviour and Neuroscience
  4. Cells and Infection
  5. Plant Cellular and Molecular Processes

28
FACULTY
Michelle Aarts B.Sc., MSc. (Western), Ph.D.
(McGill)Assistant Professor Canada Research
Chair
ResearchMechanisms of cell survival and cell
death following heart attack and stroke
TeachesBiochemistryand Endocrinology
29
FACULTY
Maydianne Andrade B.Sc. (Simon Fraser), M.Sc.
(Toronto), Ph.D. (Cornell) Associate
ProfessorCanada Research Chair
ResearchEvolution of Mating Systems
TeachesEvolution andAnimal Behaviour
30
FACULTY
Rudy Boonstra B.Sc. (Calgary), Ph.D. (British
Columbia)Professor
ResearchEcology andNeurobiologyof Stress
TeachesGlobal Change Population Ecology
31
FACULTY
Ian Brown B.Sc. (Carleton), Ph.D. (Texas),
Professor Canada Research Chair
ResearchMolecular Neurobiologyof Heat Shock
Proteins
TeachesAnimal Developmental Biologyand
Molecular Biology
32
FACULTY
Mark Fitzpatrick B.Sc., M.Sc., (Brock), Ph.D.
(Toronto)Assistant Professor
ResearchGenetics/Genomics
TeachesGeneticsand Genomics
33
FACULTY
Sonia Gazzarrini B.Sc., M.Sc. (Milan), Ph.D.
(Tuebingen) Assistant Professor
ResearchPlant Development, Biochemistry
andMolecular Biology
TeachesPlant Developmental Biologyand Molecular
Biology
34
FACULTY
Rene Harrison B.Sc. (Winnipeg), M.Sc. (Manitoba),
Ph.D. (Toronto) Assistant Professor
ResearchCell Biology - the regulationand
function of immune cellsand bone cells.
TeachesCell Biology
35
FACULTY
Clare Hasenkampf B.Sc. (Loyola), M.Sc., Ph.D.
(Florida State) Associate Professor
ResearchPlant Genetics
TeachesFirst Year Biologyand Genetics
36
FACULTY
Herbert Kronzucker B.Sc. (Wuerzburg), Ph.D.
(British Columbia)Professor Canada Research Chair
ResearchEcophysiology of plant nutrient
acquisition Solutions to World hunger
TeachesEcology andEnvironmental Toxicology
37
FACULTY
Nate Lovejoy B.Sc., M.Sc. (Toronto), Ph.D.
(Cornell) Assistant Professor
ResearchMolecular Phylogenetics and evolution of
behaviors
TeachesEcology andEvolutionary Biology
38
FACULTY
Lisa Manne B.Sc. (Otterbein College), M.Sc.,
Ph.D. (Univ. of Tennessee) Assistant Professor
ResearchSpatial ecology, biogeography
and conservation
TeachesFirst Year Biology andConservation
Biology
39
FACULTY
Andrew Mason B.Sc. (Guelph), M.Sc., Ph.D.
(Toronto) Associate Professor
ResearchBioacoustics, Neuroethology Sensory
Systems Communication
TeachesFirst Year Biology andAnimal
Communication(Neuroscience)
40
FACULTY
Joanne Nash B.Sc. (Aberdeen), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Univ.
of Manchester) Assistant Professor
ResearchBiological Basis ofBrain Pathology and
Parkinsons Disease.
TeachesMammalian (Human) Physiologyand Nervous
System Pathology
41
FACULTY
Stephen Reid B.Sc. , Ph.D. (Ottawa) Associate
Professor
ResearchRespiratory Physiology and Neurobiology
TeachesMammalian (Human)and Animal Physiology
42
FACULTY
Dan Riggs B.Sc. (North Carolina), Ph.D. (Florida
State)Associate Professor
ResearchPlant Molecular Biology
TeachesCell and Molecular Biology
43
FACULTY
Mauricio Terebiznik B.Sc., Ph.D. (Buenos
Aires) Assistant Professor
ResearchMicrobiology
TeachesMicrobiology
44
FACULTY
Greg Vanlerberghe B.Sc., M.Sc. (Western Ontario),
Ph.D. (Queen's) Professor
ResearchMetabolism and Stress Physiology in
Plants
TeachesPlant Physiology andthe Biology of Plant
Stress
45
FACULTY
Dudley Williams B.Sc. (North Wales), Dip. Ed.
(Liverpool),M.Sc., Ph.D. (Waterloo), D.Sc.
(Wales) Professor
ResearchEcological Studiesof Running
Water Communities
TeachesBiology of Insects, River Ecologyand
Ecology Field Courses
46
FACULTY
Rongmin Zhou B.Sc. (Peking University), Ph.D.
(Chinese Academy of Agriculture) Plant
Biochemistry
Marc Cadotte B.Sc., M.Sc. (Windsor University),
PhD (Tennessee) Arriving in July 2009 Community
Ecology
47
RESOURCES
Department of Biological Sciences
www.utsc.utoronto.ca/biosci
This presentation is available online at
www.utsc.utoronto.ca/sgreid
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