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Characteristics of Model Information Literacy Programs

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Title: Characteristics of Model Information Literacy Programs


1
Characteristics of Model Information Literacy
Programs
  • University of Toronto
  • November 2001

2
What are the components that comprise successful
instruction programs?
  • Betsy Wilsons keynote, 1996 LOEX
  • Panel discussion, 1996 LOEX
  • IIL Best Practices
  • BI to IL Continuum

3
Components of Successful Instruction Programs
  • Lizabeth A. Wilson, The Way Things Work
    Teaching and Learning in Libraries, Programs
    That Work Papers and Sessions Material
    Presented at the Twenty-Fourth National LOEX
    Library Instruction Conference (Ann Arbor, MI
    Pierian Press, 1996), LOEX 96, 1-11.

4
Programs that work
  • Are integrated into the educational lifeblood of
    the institution
  • Provide an instructional lens for the rest of the
    library
  • Create a flexible and agile environment
  • Encourage learning at all levels
  • Take integrated assessment and evaluation
    seriously
  • Are learner-centered
  • Involve collaboration
  • Bring technology into the service of teaching and
    learning
  • Have a solid support framework
  • Depend on people and personalities
  • Recognize that timing is everything

5
Learner-centered
  • Based on real, not perceived, learner needs
  • Keep in touch with students
  • Recognize wide variety of learners

6
Collaboration
  • Shared visions
  • Cross-campus involvement
  • Sharing control
  • Negotiating skills and making tradeoffs
  • Tolerate ambiguity
  • Based on trust

7
Technology
  • Technology is at the service of teaching and
    learning
  • Know what to achieve educationally before
    employing technology

8
Support Framework
  • Information literacy programs have an
    organizational home in the library.
  • Librarys teaching mission is prominent
  • Adequate and stable support services
  • Support of the library director

9
People and Personalities People who make
programs work
  • Confident and articulate in their expertise
  • Visionaries, gurus, charismatic who move groups
    forward
  • Great mentors, share experiences

10
Timing is everything
  • Look for connections everywhere
  • Experiment, be ready to implement new innovations
  • Keep network of enterprises working overtime

11
Lifeblood of the Educational Enterprise
  • Integrated into the curriculum, not adjunct
    services
  • Continual, deliberate, and targeted communication

12
Instruction is the Lens
  • Instruction is the lens through which every
    function of the library needs to look.
  • Cerise Oberman, Avoiding the Cereal Syndrome
    or Critical Thinking in the Electronic
    Environment, Library Trends 39 (Winter 1991)
    189-202.

13
Flexible and Agile Environment
  • Reward and support experimentation
  • Take risks

14
Continual Learning at All Levels
  • Environment that supports, rewards, and
    encourages librarians to keep learning is critical

15
Integrated Assessment and Evaluation
  • Assessment is first and foremost
  • Ask the right assessment questions
  • Systematically listen
  • Gather routine information
  • Use information to improve and enhance

16
Programs That Work Panel Discussion
  • Thomas G. Kirk, Jr., Patricia Iannuzzi, Corinne
    Laverty, Carla List, and Margaret Fain, Programs
    That Work Panel Discussion, Programs That
    Work Papers and Sessions Material Presented at
    the Twenty-Fourth National LOEX Library
    Instruction Conference (Ann Arbor, MI Pierian
    Press, 1996), 35-53.

17
Programs That Work Panel Discussion
  • Linked to goals and educational philosophy of the
    institution
  • Receives library and college administrative
    support
  • Is supported by the teaching faculty
  • Has stated objectives/ outcomes/ missions/ goals
  • Is designed to meet the needs of students
  • Evolves continually to incorporate changing
    technology and curricula
  • Is assessed/evaluated regularly
  • Incorporates active learning techniques whenever
    possible
  • Includes an infrastructure to provide clerical
    support, instructional materials, and facilities

18
Identifying the characteristics of best practice
  • Institute for Information Literacy, Best
    Practices and Assessment of Information Literacy
    Programs, http//www.ala.org/acrl/nili/criteria.
    html
  • Used Delphi method to identify characteristics

19
Categories of Characteristics
  • Mission
  • Goals and objectives
  • Planning
  • Administrative Institutional Support
  • Articulation with the curriculum
  • Collaboration with Classroom Faculty
  • Pedagogy
  • Staff
  • Outreach
  • Assessment

20
Mission
  • Be consistent with the Information Literacy
    Competency Standards for Higher Education
    http//www.ala.org/acrl/ilcomstan.html
  • Be consistent with institutional mission
    statement.
  • Included a working definition of information
    literacy.
  • Clearly reflect the contributions of and expected
    benefits to all institutional constituencies.
  • Be consistent with the format of similar
    institutional documents.
  • Be reviewed and, and, if necessary, revised,
    periodically.
  • Be appropriately worded for the intended
    audience.

21
Goals and Objectives
  • Be stated to reflect sound pedagogical practice
    and revised periodically.
  • Be clearly articulated.
  • Be in concert with the goals and objectives of
    the institution.
  • Be developed with input from various
    constituencies.
  • Include integration of information literacy
    across the curriculum.
  • Accommodate student growth in skills and
    understanding throughout the college years.
  • Apply both to traditional and, where appropriate,
    distance education environments.
  • Include measurable outcomes that allow students
    to demonstrate their mastery of the underlying
    concepts of information literacy.
  • Be designed to prepare students for their current
    curricular activities and for effective life-long
    learning.
  • Include assessment.

22
Planning
  • Be conducted at the program, curriculum and
    institutional levels.
  • Include an information literacy definition for
    the program.
  • Result in a document or documents charting the
    course of the program, including establishing the
    means for implementing and adaptation.
  • Articulate the mission, goals, objectives and the
    pedagogical foundation for the program.
  • Document budgeting for the program, including
    administrative and institutional support.
  • Include periodic assessment of the student
    environment to determine student needs.
  • Ensure that the program articulates with existing
    curriculum.
  • Establish assessment mechanisms at the outset.
  • Include current and projected staffing levels.
  • Include a program for professional, faculty and
    staff development.

23
Administrative Institutional Support
  • Give clear identification of resources and
    responsibility to a person, or team of persons,
    for an information literacy program.
  • Recognize and encourage collaboration among
    classroom faculty and librarians and other
    program staff.
  • Include in the budgeting and management process
    the programs staffing, budgeting and continuing
    education needs.
  • Articulate their support for the program.
  • Value and recognize within the institutional
    reward system participation in the information
    literacy program.
  • Recognize, identify, fund and support the need
    for appropriate formal and informal teaching
    spaces.

24
Articulation with the Curriculum
  • Be developed with and integrated into existing
    academic and vocational programs in collaboration
    with departments, rather than solely with
    individual faculty.
  • Place the emphasis on students learning in the
    context of other courses and subjects.
  • Use teaching methods most appropriate for the
    educational environment of the institution.
  • Integrate information skills literacy throughout
    a students academic career rather than as a
    one-time experience.
  • Progress in complexity as students move through
    their academic experiences.

25
Collaboration with Classroom Faculty
  • Foster communication within the academic
    community to garner support for an information
    literacy program.
  • Result in a process that includes all groups in
    planning, pedagogy, assessment,
    course/curriculum, and assignment development
    aspects of the information literacy program.
  • Occur whether the information literacy effort
    resides in a separate credit-bearing course or in
    existing discipline-based courses.
  • Occur before a course syllabus is constructed and
    distributed.
  • Provide a mechanism for continuous improvement of
    the program.
  • Foster the development of lifelong learning
    skills.

26
Pedagogy
  • Adopt a diverse, multi-disciplinary approach to
    teaching and learning.
  • Encompass critical thinking and reflection.
  • Support student-centered learning.
  • Include active and collaborative learning
    activities.
  • Build on the existing knowledge that students
    bring into the classroom.
  • Incorporate variations in learning and teaching
    styles.
  • Involve various combinations of teaching and
    learning techniques for individuals and groups.
  • Include collaboration with classroom faculty and
    student researchers.
  • Relate information literacy to on-going course
    work.
  • Experiment with a wide variety of methods.

27
Staff
  • Be adequate in number and have appropriate
    expertise and experience.
  • Include or collaborate with program coordinators,
    graphic designers, distance educators, multimedia
    authoring specialists, librarians and classroom
    faculty.
  • Have experience in curriculum development and
    instruction/teaching, and expertise to develop,
    coordinate, maintain, and evaluate information
    literacy programs.
  • Employ a collaborative approach to working with
    others.
  • Be provided with systematic and continual
    opportunities to take part in professional
    development and training.

28
Outreach
  • Include both communication and publicity to the
    internal campus constituent groups and to
    external groups such as higher education
    professional organizations, librarians and other
    staff at institutions such as K-12 schools,
    public libraries, colleges/universities targeted
    as transfer institutions.
  • Use a variety of outreach channels broad
    mailings of notices/press releases articles in
    campus news media faculty/staff development
    sessions annual reports web pages campus
    discipline-based meetings disciplinary-based
    publications, etc.
  • Demonstrate an active involvement in campus
    professional development training by offering or
    co-sponsoring workshops and programs that relate
    to information literacy for faculty and staff.
  • Include sharing of information, methods and plans
    with peers from other institutions to further the
    advancement of information literacy in a region
    or state.

29
Assessment
  • Be primarily used as part of an ongoing
    planning/improvement program.
  • Include measurements of both program and student
    outcomes.
  • Be integrated with course and curriculum
    assessment.
  • Be included in episodic institutional evaluations
    and regional/professional accreditation
    initiatives.
  • Be directly related to the goals and objectives
    of the program.
  • Be focused on performance, knowledge acquisition,
    and attitude appraisal.
  • Include both peer and self-evaluation.
  • Respect differences in learning and teaching
    styles by using a variety of measures such as
    portfolio assessment, quizzes, essays, direct
    observation, anecdotal, peer review, and
    experience.
  • Use multiple methods of evaluation.

30
                     
31
Model Programs
  • University of Washington -- Uwired
  • http//www.washington.edu/uwired/
  • University of Texas at Austin -- TILT
  • http//tilt.lib.utsystem.edu/
  • Five Colleges of Ohio -- Integrating Information
    Literacy into the Liberal Arts Curriculum
  • http//www.denison.edu/ohio5/grant/

32
Model Programs (cont.)
  • University of Arizona -- The Information Literacy
    Project
  • http//dizzy.library.arizona.edu/infolit/
  • California State University San Marcos
  • http//ww2.csusm.edu/library/ILP/
  • University of California -- Berkeley
  • http//www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/
  • Florida International University
  • http//www.fiu.edu/7Elibrary/ili/iliprop1.html

33
Model Programs (cont.)
  • Earlham College
  • http//www.earlham.edu/libr/about/about.htm
  • University of Louisville --Lifelong Learning
    Through the Libraries
  • http//www.louisville.edu/infoliteracy
  • University of Wisconsin -- Parkside
  • http//www.uwp.edu/library/

34
Read More About It
  • Directory of Online Resources for Information
    Literacy," edited by Drew Smith and sponsored by
    the School of Library and Information Science at
    the University of South Florida
  • http//nosferatu.cas.usf.edu/lis/il
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