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Quality Counts: A Third Year Check Up Building a Shared Vision and Reading some Tea Leaves November

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Title: Quality Counts: A Third Year Check Up Building a Shared Vision and Reading some Tea Leaves November


1
Quality CountsA Third Year Check Up Building a
SharedVisionandReading some Tea
LeavesNovember 6, 2009
  • Nick Michelli
  • Presidential Professor
  • The Graduate Center
  • The City University of New York

2
OrA bridge over the fog.
3
The questions I will raise
  • How do we form a vision for education in a
    democracy and why is it a precursor to
    assessment?
  • Why do we educate in a Democracy?
  • What can we expect in federal and state policy?
    (READING THE TEA LEAVES) What are the
    implications for us?

4
How do we form a vision for education in a
democracy and why is it a precursor to
assessment.
5
How do we form a vision for education in a
democracy and why is it a precursor to
assessment.It used to be that if you had a
vision, you were carried off in a straight
jacket.
6
The Importance of aShared Vision
  • A shared vision is not an idea. It is not even
    an important idea such as freedom. It is,
    rather, a force in peoples hearts, a force of
    impressive power. It might be inspired by an
    idea, but once it goes further--if it is
    compelling enough to acquire the support of more
    than one person--then it is no longer an
    abstraction. People begin to see it as if it
    exists. Few, if any, forces in human affairs are
    as powerful as a shared vision.
  •  

7
The Importance of aShared Vision
  • At its simplest level, a shared vision is the
    answer to the question, What do we want to
    create? Just as personal visions are pictures
    or images people carry in their heads and hearts,
    so too are shared visions pictures that people
    throughout an organization carry. They create a
    sense of commonality that permeates the
    organization and gives coherence to diverse
    activities.
  • Peter Senge The Fifth Discipline
  •  

8
Are conceptual frameworks shared visions?
  • They can be
  • If all the important stakeholders participate in
    their formation--faculty in education, faculty in
    arts and science, faculty in schools, members of
    the community.
  • If you take the time to be sure you mean the same
    thing by the essentially contested concepts.
  • If the vision/framework drives your work
    admission, curriculum, content, pedagogy, field
    experiences, and assessment.

9
W.B. Gallies Contribution
  • Essentially Contested Concepts
  • Inherently subject to multiple interpretations,
    depending on your values, concerns, experiences,
    goals, and beliefs
  • Democracy, freedom, social justice, and, yes,
    education.

10
We need a shared vision with two partsWhy do
we educate in a democracy?Given that, what is
our vision of high quality teachers?
11
Why do we educate in a democracy?What are the
purposes of education?
  • 1. Preparing students to have access to
    knowledge and critical thinking within the
    disciplines.

12
From Wisconsin Conceptual Frameworks
  • Activities and programs that integrate content
    and construct knowledge processes
  • Develop reflective educators who are
    metacognitive and constructivist
  • Teachers and students together experiencecritical
    thinking.
  • Meeting the needs of all children and the belief
    that all children can learn.

13
Michellis Analysis
Preparing students to have access to knowledge
and critical thinking within the disciplines.
  • What does knowledge mean?
  • What are the implications of constructivism?
  • What does access to knowledge mean?
  • Why within the disciplines?
  • What constitutes critical thinking?

14
Why do we educate in a democracy?What are the
purposes of education?
  • 2. Preparing students to be active, involved,
    socially just participants in our democracy.

15
From Wisconsin Conceptual Frameworks
  • Understand the fundamental purpose of schooling
    in a democratic society and pursue teaching as a
    transformative experience.
  • Education to promote social justice and the
    common good.
  • Vision of education that strives for a democratic
    society in which exceptionality, gender, social
    class, race, ethnicity and affectional preference
    are included and affirmed in all realms of social
    and political democracy

16
Michellis Analysis
Preparing students to be active, involved,
socially just participants in our democracy.
  • Why active and involved?
  • Why participants and not citizens?
  • What does socially just mean?
  • What does democracy mean?

17
What are some of the goals when we focus on
preparing students for democracy?
  • Emphasis on critical thinking and making
    judgments.
  • Developing empathy and respect for alternative
    positions.
  • Learning to argue well for our positions and how
    to compromise
  • Learning to participate in community meetings
  • Learning to give reasons for positions
  • Creating classroom communities of inquiry

18
Why do we educate in a democracy?What are the
purposes of education?
  • 3. Helping students imagine and achieve all the
    possibilities for their places in the society and
    to have full access to lifes chances.

19
From Wisconsin Conceptual Frameworks
  • Profound respect for the dignity of all learners.
  • Professional competencies that enable them to be
    effective teachers and responsible citizens in a
    diverse and dynamic world.

20
Michellis Analysis
Helping students imagine and achieve all the
possibilities for their places in the society
and to have full access to lifes chances.
  • Why imagine?
  • Why achieve? Is all the possibilities
    possible?
  • What does places in society mean?
  • How does access to lifes chances fit?
  • Can this be part of a definition for social
    justice?

21
  • We cannot become what we cannot imagine
  • --Maxine Greene

22
Why do we educate in a democracy?What are the
purposes of education?
  • 4. Enabling students to lead rich and rewarding
    personal lives characterized by understanding the
    full range of human knowledge, including access
    to technology, the aesthetics, creativity, and
    personal health.

23
From Wisconsin Conceptual Frameworks
  • Reflection is a powerful tool for lifelong
    learning and for personal and professional
    transformation.
  • Reflection enables learning-centered individuals
    to review, reconstruct, reenact and critically
    analyze their own actions and beliefs to
    determine a course of action.

24
Michellis Analysis
  • Enabling students to lead rich and rewarding
    personal lives
  • characterized by access to understanding the full
    range of
  • human knowledge, including technology,
  • the aesthetics, creativity, and personal health.
  • Can leading rich and rewarding personal lives be
    measured?
  • Why is it important to say full range of human
    knowledge?
  • Are technology, aesthetics, and creativity
    honored?
  • Is education responsible for personal health?
  • What makes learning lifelong?

25
A Perfect Storm (From 2006)
  • NCLB
  • Pressure for high stakes testing at all levels
  • Pressure for scientifically based research
  • The Levine Report Educating School Teachers
    (www.edschools.org)
  • Pressure on Accreditors
  • Using test scores to evaluate and compensate
    educators.

26
Time for the tea leaves. . .
  • You share a broad view of why we educate in a
    democracy, reflected in your conceptual
    frameworks.
  • What can we expect in federal and state policy?
    How do we fit in?

27
Who is this man?
28
Which tea leaves am I reading?
  • The USDOE Official Biography
  • Race to the Top Regulations
  • Major policy addresses on teacher education at
    University of Virginia and Teachers College
  • Teacher Quality Partnership Grants

29
From the official USDOE bio
  • In his confirmation hearings, Duncan called
    education "the most pressing issue facing
    America," adding that "preparing young people for
    success in life is not just a moral obligation of
    society" but also an "economic imperative."

30
  • "Education is also the civil rights issue of our
    generation," he said, "the only sure path out of
    poverty and the only way to achieve a more equal
    and just society."
  • "to enhance education in America, to lift our
    children and families out of poverty, to help our
    students learn to contribute to the civility of
    our great American democracy, and to strengthen
    our economy by producing a workforce that can
    make us as competitive as possible."

31
  • Duncan graduated magna cum laude from Harvard
    University in 1987, majoring in sociology. He was
    co-captain of Harvard's basketball team and was
    named a first team Academic All-American. He
    credits basketball with his team-oriented and
    highly disciplined work ethic.
  • From 1987 to 1991, Duncan played professional
    basketball in Australia, where he also worked
    with children who were wards of the state.

32
He was part of a team that later started a new
public elementary school built around a financial
literacy curriculum.
33
Prior to joining the Chicago Public Schools,
Duncan ran the non-profit education foundation
Ariel Education Initiative (1992-1998), which
helped fund a college education for a class of
inner-city children under the I Have A Dream
program.
34
Duncan served as the chief executive officer of
the Chicago Public Schools, a position to which
he was appointed by Mayor Richard M. Daley, from
June 2001 through December 2008, becoming the
longest-serving big-city education superintendent
in the country.
35
Among his most significant accomplishments during
his tenure as CEO, an all-time high of 66.7
percent of the district's elementary school
students met or exceeded state reading standards,
and their math scores also reached a record high,
with 70.6 percent meeting or exceeding the
state's standards.
36
The number of teachers applying for positions
almost tripled since 2003, from about 8,600 to
more than 21,000, or about 10 applicants per
teaching position. The number of teachers
achieving National Board Certificationthe
highest education credential available to
teachersincreased from 11 in 1999 to 1,191 in
2008, making Chicago the fastest-growing urban
district in this area of achievement.
37
Race to the Top Fund 4.35 Billion
38
Race to the Top Fund 4.35 Billion July 29
Criteria Absolute Requirement
  • No legal, statutory, or regulatory barriers to
    linking data on student achievement or student
    growth to teachers or principals for the purpose
    of teacher or principal evaluation.

39
Race to the Top CriteriaJuly 29, 2009
  • Extent of statewide longitudinal data system
  • Presence of alternate routes to certification for
    teachers and principles that allow for providers
    in addition IHEs.
  • Define effective teachers and principals with
    data that includes student growth.
  • Compensate and promote principals and teachers
    who are highly effective.

40
Race to the Top CriteriaJuly 29, 2009
  • Link student achievement data to teachers and
    principals.
  • Link this information to programs where each of
    those teachers and principals was prepared for
    credentialing.
  • Publicly report the finding for each
    credentialing program that has twenty or more
    graduates annually.

41
Race to the Top CriteriaJuly 29, 2009
  • Use rapid time student data to inform and guide
    the support provided both teachers and
    principals. professional development.
  • Presence of a charter school law that does not
    prohibit or effectively inhibit increasing the
    number of charter schools or otherwise restrict
    student enrollment in charter schools.
  • Turn around struggling schools by closing them,
    converting to charters, or contracting with
    educational management company.

42
Where is Race to the Top?
  • Budgeted for .4.35 Billion in American Recovery
    and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
  • For comparison, total federal spending in FY 08
    was 101.9 Billion.
  • By the closing there were well over 1,000
    comments on the 7/29 regulations, many objecting
    to the degree of inflexibility in the
    regulations. Final regs due any day.

43
Teacher Quality Partnership Grants
  • Round 1 Sept. 30 43 million to 28 institutions
    to reform traditional university teacher prep
    programs and residency programs.
  • In 2010 an additional 100 million will be
    awarded.
  • No Wisconsin institutions received awards in
    Round 1.
  • One example, 11 million (6 grant 5 match) to
    produce 100 new teachers in 5 years. That is
    110,000 each.

44
Secretarys Major Policy Addresses on Teacher
Education
  • University of Virginia, October 9, 2009
  • Teachers College, Columbia University, October
    22, 2009

45
UVA
  • Education is the civil rights issue of our
    generation.
  • Great teaching is a daily fight for social
    justice.
  • In the next 4 years we could lose 1/3 of our
    veteran teachers, need for 1 million by 2010.
  • 35 of public school students are Latino or Black
    while less than 15 of teachers are.

46
UVA
  • Teacher education programs produce 220,000
    teachers a year while alternate routes produce
    fewer than 10,000 a year.
  • Education schools are the neglected stepchild.
  • The dont attract the best students or faculty.
  • They are heavy on educational theory and light on
    core area knowledge and clinical training under
    master teachers.

47
UVA
  • Student teachers are not prepared to use data to
    improve instruction.
  • Many are not prepared for the rigors of teaching
    in high-poverty and high-need schools.
  • Education schools are the Bermuda Triangle of
    higher education--students sail in but no one
    knows what happens to them when they come our,
    which are succeeding, which are failing, which
    training worked

48
Teachers College
  • Every teacher education program should make
    better outcomes for students the overarching
    mission that propels all their efforts.
  • Teacher Education programs are the Rodney
    Dangerfield of higher education--no respect from
    Oval Office to the Provosts Office, from
    University Presidents to Secretaries of
    Education.
  • Three out of five ed school alum surveyed for
    Levine report said training did not prepare them
    adequately for work in the classroom.

49
TC
  • What are the obstacles to reform? Too simple to
    blame education schools.
  • Schools of education renowned for being cash cows
    for universities.
  • Arts and science play an essential role in
    strengthening the content knowledge, ignore their
    teacher education programs, and them complain
    about the incoming freshmen not knowing content
    because their teachers didnt.

50
TC
  • Race to the Top rewards states that publicly
    report and link student achievement data to
    programs where principals and teachers were
    accredited.
  • Federal government is funding a large expansion
    of teacher residency programs in high-need
    districts and schools.
  • Louisiana and New York City are examples of
    places where teaching the impact of teacher
    education programs on outcomes are underway.
  • Universities are partnering with school
    districts, opening up lab schools, magnet
    schools, , and charter schools, and professional
    development schools.

51
TC
  • NCATE and AACTE are firmly behind the new drive
    to link teacher preparation programs to better
    student outcomes.
  • NCATEs new accreditation will be modeled in part
    on Tennessees evolving experiment requiring all
    undergraduate teacher candidates to spend their
    senior year in year-long residency programs. I
    hope other states and schools of education shift
    more to the residency model.
  • AACTEs project is based on Californias
    Performance Assessment for Teachers with 14
    states signed up to pilot the performance.

52
TC
  • Our best programs are
  • Coherent and up to date
  • Research based
  • Provide students with subject mastery
  • Have a strong substantial field based program
    driving work in classroom management, student
    learning, and preparing to teach diverse students
  • A shared vision of what constitutes good teaching
    and best practices
  • A single minded focus on improving student
    learning and using data to inform instruction.

53
TC
  • Every teacher education program should make
    better outcomes for students the overarching
    mission that propels all their efforts.
  • Teacher Education programs are the Rodney
    Dangerfield of higher education--no respect from
    Oval Office to the Provosts Office, from
    University Presidents to Secretaries of
    Education.
  • Three out of five ed school alum surveyed for
    Levine report said training did not prepare them
    adequately for work in the classroom.

54
TC
  • Examples of excellent programs include
  • Emporia State University, 80 students supervised
    by full time faculty and all elementary education
    professors are in public schools every day.
    Senior year is 100 field based.
  • Alverno College, requires rigorous field
    experience in the public schools and has faculty
    and local principals assess videotapes of student
    teachers. 85 of Alverno students are in
    teaching five years later.
  • Black Hills State University has a partnership
    with Rapid City using school based math coaches
    and graduate level courses for teachers to boost
    math achievement among Native American students.

55
TC
  • When ESEA is reauthorized we will reinvest in
    teacher education programs
  • We will encourage partnerships with states and
    teachers to address shortages in high needs areas
  • We will encourage programs committed to results
    use data, including student achievement data, to
    foster continuous improvement.

56
The Levine Report Educating School Teachers
  • Focus on student achievement as the primary
    measure of teacher education program success.
  • generate a data base that can be used to assess
    and improve the performance of education schools
    by providing information on the performance of
    the teachers and principals who were prepared at
    the institution.and assess which types of
    teacher education are most effective

57
The Levine Report Educating School Teachers
  • Close failing teacher education programs,
    strengthen promising programs and expand
    excellent programs by creating incentives for
    outstanding students and career changers to enter
    teacher education at doctoral universities.

58
  • Henry Adams said that a teacher affects
    eternity--he can never tell where his influence
    stops.

59
WAIT!!! Would this count as a good example of
an educational experience?How would we measure
the outcomes?When will we know the effect?
60
The National Network for Educational Renewal
Member Settings
  • Cal State Chico and Chico Public Schools
  • Colorado State University and Public School
    Network
  • The University of Connecticut and the UC Public
    School Network
  • Georgia Center for Educational Renewal at GSU
  • Hawaii Institute for School Partnerships
  • Illinois State University and Chicago Public
    Schools
  • University of Southern Maine and SM Partnership
  • Brandon (CA) School University Partnership

61
The National Network for Educational Renewal
Member Settings
  • St. Cloud Network for Educational Renewal
  • Metropolitan St. Louis Consortium for Educational
    Renewal
  • The Missouri University School Partnership
  • The Nebraska Network for Educational Renewal
  • New Jersey Network for Educational Renewal at
    Montclair State University
  • The City University of New York and the New York
    City Public Schools
  • Albuquerque/University of New Mexico Partnership
  • Miami University Partnership (OH)

62
The National Network for Educational Renewal
Member Settings
  • The Wright State/Dayton Partnership
  • South Carolina Network for Educational Renewal
  • Arlington University School Network
  • University of Texas at El Paso/El Paso Network
    for Educational Renewal
  • Brigham Young University School Partnership
  • University of Washington Partnership
  • Benedum Collaborative/West Virginia University
  • The Wyoming School Partnership/University of
    Wyoming

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So, where does this leave us?
  • Give up on a broader view of why we educate?
  • Figure out how to provide evidence for harder to
    measure goals?
  • Lobby for what is important? With whom?
  • Attend to both the politically important measures
    and the broader view?

73
What are some of the goals when we focus on
preparing students for democracy?
  • Emphasis on critical thinking and making
    judgments.
  • Developing empathy and respect for alternative
    positions.
  • Learning to argue well for our positions and how
    to compromise
  • Learning to participate in community meetings
  • Learning to give reasons for positions
  • Creating classroom communities of inquiry

74
What does teaching for social justice mean?
  • Social justice as nondiscrimination.
  • Social justice as nonrepression.
  • Social justice as opening up lifes chances to
    all students.
  • What does Father Coughlin have to do with this?

75
Here is where we stand now
  • We argue that democracy and social justice are
    not separable as conceptsyou cant have one
    without the other.
  • In its essence, socially just democratic living
    is conjoint associated living characterized by
    the care for others, consideration of the views
    of others, argument that is based on reason,
    civic participation, and living a life defined by
    nonrepression and nondiscrimination of others.
  • Michelli and Keiser, Teacher Education for
    Democracy and Social Justice, (New York
    Routledge, 2005).
  • And, the what edition in 2009????

76
Providing Evidence of Hard to Measure Outcomes
  • The Lincoln Center Institute School of the Arts
    and Imagination
  • Dr. Scott Noppe-Brandon
  • Dr. Madeline Holzer
  • Dr. Maxine Greene
  • What are the outcomes of aesthetic education?
  • Aesthetic Capacities
  • Deep Noticing identifying and articulating
    layers of detail in a work of art through
    continuous action with it over time.
  • Embodying to experience a work of art through
    your senses, as well as emotionally, and also to
    physically represent that experience

77
Providing Evidence of Hard to Measure Outcomes
  • Questioning to ask questions throughout your
    explorations that further your own learning to
    ask the question, What if?
  • Identifying Patterns to find relationships
    among the details you notice, group them, and
    recognize patterns
  • Creating Meaning to create your own
    interpretation based on the previous capacities.

78
Providing Evidence of Hard to Measure Outcomes
  • Teaching for Social Justice
  • Marilyn Cochran Smith and associates at Boston
    College have developed measures to examine
    teaching for social justice.

79
Providing Evidence of Hard to Measure Outcomes
  • Focus on School Climate
  • Educators have written about and studied school
    climate for 100 years. School climate refers to
    the quality and character of school life. It is
    based on patterns of peoples experiences of
    school life and reflects norms, goals, values,
    interpersonal relationships, teaching and
    learning practices and organizational structure.
  • However, school climate is more than an
    individual experience It is a group phenomenon
    that is larger than any one persons experience.
    A sustainable, positive school climate fosters
    youth development and learning necessary for a
    productive, contributative, and satisfying life
    in a democratic society.

80
Sound like a shared vision??
  • The National School Climate Standards. Adopted
    or under consideration for adoption in 12 states.
  • The School Climate Inventory measures school
    climate (teachers, students, administrators,
    parents)
  • Cohen, McCabe, Michelli, Pickeral. School
    Climate Research, Policy, Practice and Teacher
    Education. Teachers College Record, January,
    2009.

81
Two Alberts
  • Not everything that can be counted counts, and
    not everything that counts can be counted.
    --Albert Einstein
  • What matters is what we measure.
  • Albert Shanker
  • That is NOT the same as We measure what matters.

82
Mary Diezs Three UmpiresA Baseball/Assessment
Parable
  • Three Umpires Perspectives
  • I call them as they are!
  • I call them as I see them!
  • They arent until I call them!!

83
  • Henry Adams said that a teacher affects
    eternity--he can never tell where his influence
    stops.
  • Quoted in Secretary Duncans Address at Teachers
    College, Columbia University, October 22, 2009.

84
The future belongs to those who believe in the
beauty of their dreams. Eleanor Roosevelt
A small group of thoughtful people could change
the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that
ever has. Margaret Mead The Cost of Liberty
is less than the price of repression. W.E.B.
DuBois
The future will be better tomorrow.
George W. Bush
We are the ones we have been waiting for! Barack
Obama
85
Let me know how it goes!Keep in
touch!Nmichelli_at_gc.cuny.edu917-882-7670
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