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Student Affairs Planning and Outcome Assessment

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The QEP Theme Creating Communities of Learners through Active Learning ... problem solving, analysis of situations and issues, creativity, and discernment. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Student Affairs Planning and Outcome Assessment


1
Student Affairs Planning and Outcome Assessment
  • The Next Generation Enhancing Planning and
    Assessment and Integrating Student Learning
    Outcomes

2
The Plan for the Afternoon!
  • The QEP Theme Creating Communities of Learners
    through Active Learning and Student Engagement.
  • The Focused QEP Project Management SLOs.

3
The Plan for the Afternoon!
  • In the interests of alignment with the
    Universitys QEP the afternoon will include
  • A modest amount of content delivery via
    instructor presentation.
  • A selection of resource material that the
    students will have access to for directed self
    discovery.
  • Active learning strategies which will support
    students constructing their own learning and
    understanding.
  • Group work activities that encourage project
    management skills.

4
Planning and Assessment in Student Affairs
  • Planning and Assessment in Student Affairs will
    consist of three major elements
  • Program Outcomes
  • Student Development Outcomes
  • Student Learning Outcomes

5
Planning and Assessment in Student Affairs
  • Program Outcomes
  • What do we expect our programs to do?
  • What are the outputs of our programs?
  • What are the critical performance indicators?
  • Participation
  • Satisfaction
  • Quality
  • Quantity
  • What does success in these performance indicators
    look like?

6
Planning and Assessment in Student Affairs
  • Student Development Outcomes
  • What theoretical construct do we subscribe to?
  • How do we hope students will develop or change
    personally due to our efforts?
  • Psycho-social
  • Moral

7
Planning and Assessment in Student Affairs
  • Student Learning Outcomes.
  • Within the context of identified student contact
    areas, what do we expect students to learn?
  • Activity participants.
  • Service recipients.
  • Student leaders.
  • Student employees.
  • Not all areas will have student learning outcomes.

8
A Paradigm Shift
  • A major paradigm shift is occurring in higher
    education.
  • Moving away from instruction-based (course
    objectives, what the teacher will do).
  • Moving toward learner-centered (what the student
    will learn as evidenced by what they know, can
    do, and value).
  • Focusing on assessment and accountability.

9
A Paradigm Shift
  • An instructor-centered context places the means
    (delivery of instruction) in position of the
    institutions purpose the mission of the
    university is to provide courses.

10
A Paradigm Shift
  • A learner -centered context focuses the purpose
    on what students are expected to learn and
    accomplish as described in outcome statements at
    the University, college, program, and course
    level the mission of the university is student
    learning.

11
A Paradigm Shift
  • How do we describe our expectations of student
    knowledge, skills, abilities, and values
    resulting from the UWF educational experience?
  • University Learning Outcome Domains.
  • Academic Learning Compacts.
  • Student Affairs Outcomes.

12
A Paradigm Shift
  • An assessment system will determine if students
    have acquired these competencies.
  • Academic course-, program-, college and
    University-level.
  • Student Affairs activity-, program/department-,
    division-, and University-level.

13
What is Student Learning?
  • Student learning is defined to include changes in
    students knowledge, skills, behaviors, and/or
    values that may be attributed to the students
    experiences at the University of West Florida.

14
What is Student Learning?
  • At UWF this definition is operationalized as six
    domains of student learning
  • Content,
  • Critical Thinking,
  • Communication Skills,
  • Project Management,
  • Values and Ethics,
  • Discipline Specific Outcomes.

15
What is Student Learning?
  • The Content domain includes the concepts,
    theories, and frameworks of the collective
    discipline areas.

16
What is Student Learning?
  • The Communication domain includes the various
    modes of communication essential for effective
    writing, speaking, and otherwise presenting or
    demonstrating information and ideas.

17
What is Student Learning?
  • The Critical Thinking domain includes effective
    information literacy and mnagement, problem
    solving, analysis of situations and issues,
    creativity, and discernment.

18
What is Student Learning?
  • The Project Management domain includes
    development of self-regulatory behavior,
    collaboration, reflection and self-assessment,
    and project planning and execution skills
    consistent with a particular discipline.

19
What is Student Learning?
  • The Values and Ethics domain includes academic
    integrity, discipline specific professional
    standards, and values-based decision making.

20
What is Student Learning?
  • The Discipline Specific Outcomes domain is
    optional and includes any special outcomes that
    distinguish a particular field of study such as
    professional certification or licensure.

21
How did we get here today?
  • Historically, there have been three major
    philosophical movements in student affairs
    practice student services, student development,
    and student learning.

22
How did we get here today?
  • The student services approach suggested that the
    primary purpose of the profession was to provide
    specialized services to support the academic
    mission of the institution - that the academy
    should provide student personnel services
    designed to integrate the classroom and outside
    the classroom.

23
How did we get here today?
  • The student development movement emerged as
    student affairs practitioners sought to regain
    relevance to the direct educational mission of
    the academy. Student Development reflects
    theories of human growth and environmental
    influences as applied to in-class and
    out-of-class personal learning opportunities.

24
How did we get here today?
  • Student learning addresses more specifically the
    measurable outcomes associated with the
    collegiate experience
  • What students will know, be able to do, and value
    as a result of engagement in the academy.
  • Student learning is defined in terms of
    observable student behaviors and actions.

25
How did we get here today?
  • A student learning focus suggests that it is the
    responsibility of student affairs to proactively
    seek ways to contribute to the enhancement of
    student learning.

26
How did we get here today?
  • Which of these guiding philosophies is the right
    way?
  • It can be argued that each of the three
    approaches has a place in the functioning of the
    Division of Student Affairs at the University of
    West Florida.

27
A Model for Student Affairs Planning and
Assessment
  • Program outcomes should be stated to describe
    what programs, services, and facilities should
    accomplish. Outcomes and assessments might
    include usage data (attendance, number of events,
    number of clients), satisfaction surveys,
    benchmarking, and other direct and indirect
    measures.

28
Model for Student Affairs Planning and Assessment
  • Student development outcomes should be stated to
    describe how students will grow from
    participation in our programs, services, and
    facilities.

29
Model for Student Affairs Planning and Assessment
  • Student learning outcomes (SLOs) should be stated
    to describe what students are expected to
    demonstrate in terms of knowledge, skills, and
    values due to our programs, services, and
    facilities.

30
Student Learning Outcomes
  • Knowledge What do we want students to know?
  • Skills What do we want students to be able to
    do?
  • Attitudes/Values What do we want students to
    chose?

31
Knowledge
  • Our students will know how to learn through
    appropriate learning strategies and techniques.

32
Knowledge
  • Our students will have a global perspective that
    recognizes the connection of their education to
    the world around them.

33
Knowledge
  • Our students will know about the world of work
    including career possibilities, how to search for
    jobs, how to prepare resumes, and professional
    expectations.

34
Skills
  • Our students will be socially competent with the
    capacity for intimacy, the ability to work
    collaboratively leadership skills, the ability to
    deal with others, appropriate assertiveness,
    flexibility, the ability to speak in public, and
    patience.

35
Skills
  • Our students will be autonomous, self-directed,
    and capable of independent thought and will be
    able to take initiative and responsibility for
    their own affairs and learning.

36
Skills
  • Our students will be able to communicate
    effectively in both verbal and nonverbal modes
    and in either personal, academic, or professional
    contexts Will be able to organize ideas
    coherently and successfully articulate
    information to diverse audiences And will be
    able to express a broad range of human emotions
    in appropriate and constructive ways.

37
Skills
  • Our students will be able to recognize problems
    and develop a plan of action that adequately
    serves the needs of individuals, groups, and the
    larger community.

38
Skills
  • Our students will exhibit self-efficacy and
    self-regulatory behavior including
    decision-making abilities, organizational skills
    such as time management, budgeting, being able to
    accurately assess self and set personal goals.

39
Skills
  • Our students will be vocationally competent and
    will acquire attitudes, behaviors, and skills
    essential to employment after college.

40
Values
  • Our students will have a sense of purpose that
    include life goals and an awareness of the work
    one will do after college.

41
Values
  • Our students will express an interest in the
    welfare of others, awareness of and empathy and
    respect for needs of others, tolerance and
    acceptance of people from racial, ethnic,
    cultural, and religious backgrounds different
    from ones own.

42
Values
  • Our students will choose a life style
    characterized by wellness and health with
    appropriate stress management, physical health
    and wellness, mental health, life skills,
    nutrition awareness, and alcohol and drugs
    behaviors.

43
Values
  • Our students will have an appreciation for
    cultural matters as in the arts, literature,
    theater, aesthetic qualities of nature.

44
Values
  • Our students will choose civic engagement and
    responsibility for the communities in which they
    live and work.

45
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47
Whats Next?
  • Review vision, mission, values, and strategic
    goals to ensure that they are in appropriate
    alignment with divisional- and university-level.
  • Review department program outcomes to ensure that
    they are clearly stated and that assessment
    methods are sufficient and appropriate.

48
Draft Departmental SLO Map
49
Whats Next?
  • Develop and then map student learning outcomes
    and assessment methods.

50
Why do we assess?
  • Evidence of organizational effectiveness to
    prove were doing what we say were doing.
  • To collect and organize data that can help use
    guide change and improvement to help us do what
    were doing better.

51
What do we assess?
  • Key indicators those things that speak most
    directly to our mission.
  • We shouldnt measure everything that can be
    measured.
  • We must be selective.

52
What do we assess?
  • Outcomes (key indicators described as observable
    behaviors).
  • Program outcomes broad or specific outputs
    associated with the expected results of a
    program, facility, or service.
  • Student development outcomes broad outcomes
    associated with the growth of students across
    some theoretical or philosophical measure).
  • Student learning outcomes broad or specific
    behaviors associated with what students know, can
    do, or value after participating in our programs.

53
Where do we assess?
  • Program outcomes.
  • Primarily at the department level but some broad
    outcomes might be assessed at the division level.
  • Student development outcomes.
  • Primarily at the divisional or institutional
    level.
  • Student learning outcomes.
  • Specific outcomes will be assessed at the
    department level and linked to the broader
    divisional outcomes.

54
When do we assess?
  • Program outcomes
  • Assess at least annually but could be assessed on
    a more frequent schedule as appropriate to the
    programs, services, and facilities
  • Student development outcomes
  • Assess annually and longitudinally
  • Student learning outcomes
  • Assess at least annually but could be assessed on
    a more frequent schedule as appropriate to the
    learning outcomes

55
How do we use assessment results?
  • Begin collecting, analyzing, evaluating and
    reporting assessment outcomes.
  • Collection maintain the results of program and
    learning outcomes as appropriate to the unit of
    measurement.
  • Analysis critically review results and look for
    evidence that stated goals and objectives are
    being met.
  • Evaluation make judgments about the implications
    of results and draw conclusions about future
    planning.
  • Report organize and present results and analysis
    at departmental and divisional meetings.

56
How do we use assessment results?
  • Use outcomes assessment to guide and document
    process improvement activities.
  • Review and revise program outcomes.
  • Review and revise student development outcomes.
  • Review and revise student learning outcomes.

57
How do we institutionalize planning and
assessment?
  • Divisional planning workshops
  • Electronic posting
  • UPIC
  • Divisional Site
  • Departmental activities
  • Scholarship of Practice

58
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