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Child Abuse and Neglect

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Promotes child safety, permanent living arrangements, and child family well being ... arrives at school inadequately clothed, dirty, and with untreated head lice. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Child Abuse and Neglect


1
Child Abuse and Neglect
2
Overview
  • Laws Federal State
  • Defining Child Abuse
  • Prevalence
  • Signs of abuse
  • Reporting Procedures
  • Child Protective Services
  • Conclusions

3
Federal Law
  • Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA),
    1974
  • Provides minimum standards for defining abuse and
    neglect
  • Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA), 1997
  • Promotes child safety, permanent living
    arrangements, and child family well being
  • Requires Child Protective Service (CPS) agencies
    to provide timely and focused assessment and
    intervention

4
North Carolina Law
  • Every person or institution with cause to
    suspect that a child is abused, neglected or
    dependent, or that child has died as a result of
    maltreatment, must report that childs situation
    to the county department of social services where
    the child resides or is found (Mason, 2003).

5
North Carolina Law
  • 115C-400. School personnel to report child
    abuse. Any person who has cause to suspect child
    abuse or neglect has a duty to report the case of
    the child to the Director of Social Services of
    the county (Mason, 2003).

6
Child Abuse Defined
  • The people
  • Juvenile
  • Parent
  • Guardian
  • Custodian
  • Caretaker

7
Areas of Abuse
  • Neglect
  • Abuse
  • Dependence

8
Neglect
  • Child does not receive proper care, supervision,
    or discipline
  • Abandonment
  • Denied necessary medical or remedial care
  • Injurious environment

9
Abuse
  • Physical Abuse
  • Cruelty
  • Sexual Abuse
  • Emotional Abuse
  • Contributing to delinquency

10
Dependency
  • The childs caretaker is unable to provide care
    or supervision for the child
  • Caretaker is also unable to provide an
    alternative arrangement for the childs care

11
Prevalence
(Child Maltreatment 2004, 24)
12
Prevalence
(Child Maltreatment 2004, 23)
13
Prevalence
(Child Maltreatment 2004, 25)
14
General Signs of Abuse
  • The Child
  • Sudden changes in behavior, performance, appetite
  • Fearful of adults
  • Comes to school early, stays late, and does not
    want to go home
  • The Parent
  • Little concern for child
  • Blames the child for problems in school
  • Asks teachers to use harsh punishment
  • Sees child as bad, worthless, or burdensome

15
Signs of Neglect
  • Consistently dirty
  • Unsuitable clothing for weather
  • Extreme hunger
  • Frequently absent from school

16
Signs of Physical Abuse
  • Unexplained burns, welts, bruises
  • Bite marks

17
Signs of Sexual Abuse
  • Nightmares or bedwetting
  • Bizarre, sophisticated, or unusual sexual
    knowledge or behavior
  • Draws unusual pictures

18
Signs of Emotional Abuse
  • Hostility or stress
  • Lack of concentration

19
(Child Maltreatment 2004, XV)
20
Reporting
  • A report should include
  • Childs information
  • Parents information
  • Information on other children
  • Description of injury or condition resulting from
    suspected abuse or neglect
  • Any other significant information

21
Difficulties in Reporting
  • Personal Feelings
  • Culturally based behavior
  • Respected member of the community
  • Belief that nothing will be done
  • Previous negative experiences
  • Inadequate training in signs and reporting
    procedures

22
Overreporting Underreporting A study by S.W.
Webster et. al.
  • The mother hit her 12 year old son in the face
    using the fist. Mother is white, works as a
    dishwasher, and is known to be belligerent.
    Child appears to be difficult to communicate with.

23
S.W. Webster et. al. Results
  • Teacher
  • Never reported case of abuse
  • Perceived problems for themselves or child
  • Case
  • Physical Abuse
  • Older children

4.2
33.2
62.6
24
The Child Protective Services Process
Identification
Reporting
Intake
Screened Out
Initial Assessment or Investigation
Ruled out or Unsubstantiated
Referral
Family Assessment
Planning
Service Provision
Evaluation of Family Progress
Continued Services
Case Closure
25
Is it abuse?
  • A child arrives at school inadequately clothed,
    dirty, and with untreated head lice.
  • A child is repeatedly absent from school or late
    to school.
  • A minor female is living with her older boyfriend.

26
Conclusions
  • As an individual, and specifically as an
    educator, you are mandated by law to report
    suspected abuse or neglect. Furthermore, you
    will be a part of the largest group to make such
    reports.
  • Difficulty in recognizing some forms of abuse
    makes it important to understand the warning
    signs and to get to know individual students.
  • Understand deterrents to reporting and realize
    that by reporting you are helping the child and
    the family.

27
References
Child Welfare Information Gateway (2006).
Recognizing child abuse and neglect Signs and
symptoms. Retrieved February 25, 2007 from
http//www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/factsheets/sign
s.cfm Crosson-Tower, C. (2003). Child abuse and
neglect user manual series The role of
educators in preventing and responding to child
abuse and neglect. Washington, DC U.S.
Government Printing Office. Retrieved February
25, 2007 from http//www.childwelfare.gov/pubs
/usermanuals/educator/educator Crosson-Tower, C.
(2002). Understanding child abuse and neglect
(5th ed.). Boston, MA Allyn Bacon. Kenny,
M. C. (2001). Child abuse reporting Teachers
perceived deterrents. Child Abuse and Neglect,
25, 81-92. Mason, J. (2003). Reporting child
abuse and neglect in North Carolina. Institute
of Government, School of Government. The
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
28
National Clearing House on Child Abuse and
Neglect Information (2003). Recognizing child
abuse and neglect Signs and symptoms. Retrieved
February 25, 2007, from http//nccanch.acf.hhs.g
ov U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,
Administration on Children, Youth and Families
(2004). Child Maltreatment 2004. Washington,
DC U.S. Government Printing Office.
Retrieved February 25, 2007 from
http//www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/stats_researc
h/index.htmcan Webster, S.W., OToole, R.,
OToole, A.W., Lucal, B. (2005). Overreporting
and underreporting of child abuse Teachers
use of professional discretion. Child Abuse and
Neglect, 29, 1281-1296. Winton, M.A., Mara,
B.A. (2001). Child abuse and neglect
Multidisciplinary approaches. Needham Heights,
MA Allyn Bacon.
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