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TSP PowerPoint Presentation

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... and protective factors for suicide as other problem behaviors such ... between boys and girls. Suicide Myths & Facts. 3. People who talk about suicide don't ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: TSP PowerPoint Presentation


1
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2
MAKING EDUCATORS PARTNERS IN SUICIDE PREVENTION
  • LIFELINES A School-Based YouthSuicide
    Prevention Initiative
  • John Kalafat, Ph.D
  • Maureen M. Underwood, LCSW

3
Educational Objectives
  • Review benefits
  • Correct myths
  • Present accurate data
  • Outline roles
  • Discuss interaction with students
  • Provide additional resources

4
EVERY
  • EVERY Year
  • - there are approximately 10 youth suicides
  • for every 100,000 youth
  • EVERY Day
  • - there are approximately 11 youth suicides
  • EVERY 2 Hours and 11 Minutes
  • - a person under the age of 25 completes
    suicide

5
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6
Why Suicide Preventionis Important
  • Third leading cause of death for teens
  • Second leading cause of death in colleges
  • For every completion, there are between 50-200
    attempts
  • CDC Youth Risk Survey 8.5 grades 9-12 reported
    attempt in past year
  • 25 high school students report suicide ideation
  • Attempt rate increasing for 10-14 year olds
  • Same risk and protective factors for suicide as
    other problem behaviors such as drugs, violence,
    risky sexual activities

7
Why Educator Training is Important
According to the Carnegie Task Force on Education
School systems are not responsible for meeting
every need of their students,but when the need
directly affects learning, the school must meet
the challenge.
8
Competent School Community
  • All members of the school community areconcerned
    about the welfare of each other
  • They know how to obtainhelp for those who need it

9
Your SchoolsFirst Official Step
  • Provide the guidelines for crisis response
    ofsupport, control structure
  • Demonstrate administrative commitmentand
    support
  • Outline a prepared andplanned response

10
Staff Responsibility
  • Understand the importance of your critical but
    limited role in the identification of students
    at-risk for suicide
  • Familiarize yourself with school policies and
    procedures that address this issue
  • Learn information that facilitates identification
    of at-risk students
  • Listen to students, verbally and nonverbally, for
    warning signs
  • Identify those students who may be at elevated
    risk based on that identification
  • Refer those students to appropriate resources

11
Your Role Simplified
  • Learningsigns of risk in students
  • Identifyingat-risk students
  • Referringto appropriate resources

12
Consider Zero Tolerancefor Suicide
  • Demonstrates schools commitment to the welfare
    of all its students
  • Sends message that personal violence is as much a
    concern as other-directed violence
  • Reinforces fact that suicide is taken seriously
  • Reminds school community that resources are
    available for at-risk students

13
Role of Parents
  • Understand schools policies and procedures
  • Recognize signs of trouble in their children
  • Know what to do and where to go for resources
  • Understand how to respond to other at-risk youth

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15
Role of Students
  • Awareness of warning signs
  • Strategies for getting help personally
  • Knowledge of ways to help peers
  • Awareness of school and community resources
  • Identification of caring adults

16
Your First Step
17
Questions to Consider
  • 1. I think suicide is a rational choice.

sometimes
---------------------------------------------
18
Questions to Consider
  • 2. I think suicide should be prevented no matter
    what.

sometimes
---------------------------------------------
Never
Always
19
Questions to Consider
  • 3. Because it can be so hard to talk about, I
    think it is important to respect a students
    confidences about suicide.

sometimes
---------------------------------------------
Never
Always
20
Questions to Consider
I would do everything I could to prevent my
teenager from dating someone who hadattempted
suicide.
-----------------------------------------------
I would respectmy childs choice.
21
Talking About Suicide
On a 1 to 10 scale, rank how comfortable you are
talking about suicide.
---------------------------------------------
1
5
10
Very Uncomfortable
Very Comfortable
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23
Suicide Myths Facts
1. If questioned, youth will admit suicidal
thoughts or behaviors to parents.
24
Suicide Myths Facts
2. It is inaccurate and sexist to suggest that
there is a difference in suicidal behavior
between boys and girls.
25
Suicide Myths Facts
3. People who talk about suicide dont complete
suicide - they are just seeking attention.
26
Suicide Myths Facts
4. Talking about suicide can plant the idea in
the minds of at-risk youth.
27
Suicide Myths Facts
5. The only one who can really help a suicidal
student is a counselor or mental health
professional.
28
Suicide Myths Facts
6. Once a youth is suicidal, he / she is
suicidal forever.
29
Defining the Problem
  • ATTEMPTED SUICIDE
  • is a potentially self-injurious act
  • committed with at least some intent
  • to die as a result of the act

30
Characteristics of Suicide
  • 1. Alternative to problem perceived as unsolvable
    by any other means
  • 2. Crisis thinking colors problem solving
  • 3. Person is often ambivalent
  • 4. Suicidal solution has an irrational component
  • 5. Suicide is a form of communication

31
Risk Factors / Warning Signs
Red - Warning Signs
Yellow - Risk Factors
Green - Protective Factors
32
Risk Factors for Youth Suicide
33
Risk Factors
  • DEMOGRAPHIC
  • Age
  • Sex
  • Race
  • Sexual Orientation
  • CLINICAL
  • Psychiatric diagnosis
  • Drug / alcohol use
  • Previous attempt

34
Risk Factors
  • FAMILY
  • History of suicide
  • EXPOSURE
  • To suicide (personally or in media)
  • Death of peer under any circumstance
  • RECENT, SEVERE STRESSORS
  • Loss
  • Trouble
  • Change transition

35
Risk Factors for Youth Suicide
WARNING!!!!
36
Warning Signs
  • F

eelings
A
ctions
C
hanges
T
hreats
S
ituations
37
Making it Real
  • BRAD
  • James
  • Elena
  • Conner

38
Making it Real Brad
39
Students at Higher Risk
  • Threatening suicide
  • Looking for access to means
  • Talking or writing about death, dying, suicide
  • Previous attempt seriousenough to
    requirehospitalization

40
Making it Real
  • Brad
  • JAMES
  • Elena
  • Conner

41
Making it Real James
42
Risk Factors vs.Protective Factors
43
Protective Factors
  • Contact with a caring adult
  • Sense of connection orparticipation in school
  • Positive self-esteem andcoping skills
  • Access to and care formental / physical /
    substancedisorders

44
Fostering Protective Factors
  • Teach students it is okay to ask for help
  • Give students permission to talk abouttraumatic
    events like suicide
  • Help students identify trusted adults
  • Encourage participation inschool community
    activities
  • Acknowledge student efforts
  • Be a good listener, as often as you can

45
Making it Real
46
Dealing with At-Risk Students
  • Pay attention to who your students are, not
    justhow they perform academically
  • Notice appearance
  • Observe social skills / relationships
  • Monitor behavior changes

47
Making it Real
  • Brad
  • James
  • ELENA
  • Conner

48
Making it Real Elena
49
Talking with At-Risk Students
  • LISTEN
  • Acknowledge feelings in students terms
  • Clarify
  • Summarize
  • Validate
  • Know Your Limits
  • To ask about suicide directly?
  • Know Your Resources
  • Act
  • Follow-up

50
Making it Real
  • Brad
  • James
  • Elena
  • CONNER

51
Making it Real Conner
52
So Heres Your Homework
  • 1. Review school policy procedures
  • 2. Examine personal attitudesand values
  • 3. Consider data
  • 4. Review curriculum for reminders and for ways
    in which you can foster protective factors
    (resiliency)
  • 5. Remember your role

- Identify
- Listen
- Refer
53
Revisit This Question
On a 1 to 10 scale, rank how comfortable you are
talking about suicide, now?
---------------------------------------------
1
5
10
Very Uncomfortable
Very Comfortable
54
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55
Its in the Shelter of Each Other
...THAT WE LIVE
56
Web Resources
  • www.sptsnj.orgSociety for the Prevention of Teen
    SuicideSponsor of this program focuses on
    resources for the competent school community
  • www.sprc.orgSuicide Prevention Resource
    CenterNational Resource
  • www.afsp.orgAmerican Foundation for Suicide
    PreventionPrinted materials resources
  • www.suicidology.orgAmerican Association of
    SuicidologyData, resources, links
  • http//theguide.fmhi.usf.edu/University of
    Southern FloridaDownloadable guide for a school
    suicide prevention program

57
MAKING EDUCATORS PARTNERS IN SUICIDE PREVENTION
  • LIFELINES A School-Based YouthSuicide
    Prevention Initiative
  • John Kalafat, Ph.D
  • Maureen M. Underwood, LCSW
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