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Passport to Health

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signs or changes in your mouth, this might indicate more serious. health problems. Oral Cancer ... slowly over many years without warning signs. Symptoms do not occur ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Passport to Health


1
Passport to Health
  • A Comprehensive Roadmap
  • for Patients

North Shore Family Health Team
2
  • The North Shore Family Health Team
  • Serving the Northwestern Ontario Communities of
  • Terrace Bay, Schreiber, Jackfish,
  • Rossport and Pays Plat First Nation
  • The North Shore Family Health Team was
    established March 2006 and operational February
    2007. The NSFHT is playing a leadership role in
    the development of proactive roles for patients
    in managing their own health. While we provide
    primary prevention, screening, diagnosis and
    treatment, we also provide prevention of
    recurrence, rehabilitation and support programs
    and services tailored to the patients needs.
  • Patient Care is our focus, however working
    together, and keeping your personal Passport to
    Health booklet up to date, will allow you to
    track your own health assessment.
  • Take care of the minutes, for the hours
  • Will take care of themselves
  • Lord Chesterfield (1694-1773)

North Shore Family Health Team
3
INTRODUCTION
  • This Health Passport encourages you to
  • record your continuing health.
  • It is intended to be used as a guide for ongoing
  • health, wellness and follow-up of any
  • Chronic Disease Process.
  • This passport gives you information about early
    signs
  • of possible concerns regarding your health that
    you need to
  • discuss with your Family health Team Providers.
  • HOW TO USE YOUR PASSPORT
  • The Health Passport is designed to help you
    record important
  • information. Keep it on hand, take it with you
    when you visit your
  • Doctor or other Health Care Professional. Please
    makes sure all
  • entries are made accurately and please ask for
    assistance if required.

North Shore Family Health Team
4
PERSONAL MEDICAL RECORDS
General Information ............................................................ Page 7
Medical Insurance ............................................................... Page 7
In Case of Emergency Contact Information ........................... Page 8
Allergies/Other ............................................................. Page 9
Medical History ............................................................ Page 10
Surgical History .............................................................. Page 11
Medical Visits ............................................................... Page 12
Annual Medical/Health Assessment Visits ............................. Page 13
Medications .............................................................. Page 14
Immunization Records ........................................................ Page 13
Family History .............................................................. Page 14
My Results ............................................................ Page 15
Mammogram Record .......................................................... Page 16
Fecal Occult Blood Record ................................................. Page 17
Pap/PSA Record ............................................................. Page 18
Dental Health .............................................................. Page 19
Foot Care ............................................................. Page 20
Mental Health Information .................................................. Page 21
Pharmacy ............................................................. Page 22
North Shore Family Health Team
5
PAGE - 7 -
PAGE - 8 -
  • GENERAL INFORMATION
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • First Name Middle Name
    Last Name
  • Current Address
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • Street Apt.
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • City/Town Province
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • Country Postal Code
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • Telephone (Home) Telephone (Work)
  • MEDICAL INSURANCE
  • Provincial Health Insurance
  • Province ________________________________________
    ____________
  • IN CASE OF EMERGENCY CONTACTS
  • Ambulance/Fire/Police .... 911
  • Family Physicians
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • ______________________________________ Phone
    _______________
  • Hospital Emergency Room
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • ______________________________________ Phone
    _______________
  • Poison Control Centre
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • ______________________________________ Phone
    _______________

North Shore Family Health Team
6
PAGE - 9 -
PAGE - 10 -
  • MEDICATION ALLERGIES/SENSITIVITY
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • FOOD ALLERGIES/SENSITIVITY
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • OTHER
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • MEDICAL HISTORY

DIAGNOSIS DATE OF ONSET

















North Shore Family Health Team
7
PAGE - 11 -
PAGE - 12 -
  • SURGICAL HISTORY
  • MEDICAL VISITS

DATE HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL COMMENTS/ACTIONS

















DATE SURGEON HOSPITAL PROCEDURE

















North Shore Family Health Team
8
PAGE - 13 -
PAGE - 14 -
  • ANNUAL MEDICAL VISITS
  • HEALTH ASSESSMENT VISITS
  • MEDICAL VISITS

NAME OF PRESCRIPTION DATE STARTED DATE DISCONTINUED COMMENTS

















DATE PROVIDER COMMENTS








DATE PROVIDER COMMENTS







North Shore Family Health Team
9
PAGE - 15 -
PAGE - 16 -
  • IMMUNIZATION RECORDS
  • FAMILY HISTORY
  • Allergies ? Congenital Heart Problems
    ?
  • Eczema ? Heart Attacks ?
  • Asthma ? Early Death ?
  • Tuberculosis (T.B.) ? High Blood
    Pressure ?
  • Epilepsy ? Osteoporosis ?
  • Seizures ? Cardiovascular Disease ?
  • Learning Disorder ? Other ?
  • Early Blindness ?

DATE TYPE OF VACCINATION NOTES








North Shore Family Health Team
10
PAGE - 17 -
PAGE - 18 -
  • MY RESULTS
  • MAMMOGRAM RECORD

DATE RESULT

















DATE PROVIDER COMMENTS








North Shore Family Health Team
11
PAGE - 19 -
PAGE - 20 -
  • FECAL OCCULT BLOOD RECORD
  • PAP/PSA RECORD
  • (Prostate Specific Antigen)

DATE RESULT

















DATE RESULT

















North Shore Family Health Team
12
PAGE - 21 -
PAGE - 22 -
  • DENTAL HEALTH
  • Dentist
  • Name ____________________________________________
    _________
  • Address _________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • Phone ________________________ Fax
    _______________________
  • Oral Overall Health
  • A conversation with your dentist can help you
    understand the
  • connection between oral health and overall
    health, and ensure that
  • you are getting the best possible care.
    Discussing your medical
  • history and health issues ensures that you get
    the specialized
  • treatment you need.
  • FOOT CARE
  • Pencil in the information so that you may
    update this chart regularly.
  • Date ____________________________
  • Right Left
  • Sensitivity _________________
    __________________
  • Circulation _________________
    __________________
  • Calluses _________________ __________________
  • Sores _________________ __________________
  • Comments_________________________________________
    _________

North Shore Family Health Team
13
PAGE - 23 -
PAGE - 24 -
  • MENTAL HEALTH
  • Social/Mental Health Worker
  • Name
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • Address
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • __________________________________________________
    __________
  • PHARMACY
  • Your pharmacist may help you to manage your
    prescription
  • medications and better understand how they
    interact with each other
  • and other over-the-counter medication you may be
    taking.
  • Call you local pharmacy to see what programs may
    be offered to you
  • Medication Review Education
  • Review of high risk medications/interactions
  • PHARMACY NAME ___________________________________
    ________
  • PHONE _______________________ FAX
    ________________________

North Shore Family Health Team
14
MEDICAL INFORMATION
Diabetes
What is Diabetes? ............................................................ Page 27
Blood Pressure Control/Glucose Control ..................................................... Page 29
Glucose Meter .............................................................. Page 30
Cholesterol ............................................................ Page 30
Kidney Tests ............................................................. Page 31
Foot Care .............................................................. Page 32
Eye Assessment .............................................................. Page 33
BMI ................................................................................... Page 35
Eating Better, Feeling Better ........................................... Page 37
Lab Tests ........................................................... Page 38
Travel Advice ............................................................ Page 39
Travel Certificate .............................................................. Page 40
North Shore Family Health Team
15
PAGE - 27 -
PAGE - 28 -
  • WHAT IS DIABETES?
  • What Happens When I Eat?
  • Usually when a person eats food, the food is
    broken down into smaller
  • components and then absorbed into the blood
    stream. Glucose, one
  • of these smaller components, is a sugar essential
    for normal body
  • function. Once glucose is in the blood stream,
    the body must then
  • store it so that over time it can use this sugar
    for energy.
  • The cells, however, cannot tell that glucose is
    present in the blood.
  • They need to be told this by a messenger, a
    hormone called Insulin,
  • which is made by the pancreas. The insulin helps
    the cells recognize
  • that glucose is available and will let it in.
  • What Happens in Diabetes?
  • Diabetes is when there is too much glucose in the
    blood because the
  • cells wont take it in. There are three main
    types of Diabetes
  • Type 1 Usually diagnosed in children and
    adolescents, occurs when
  • Take more medication than planned.
  • Have alcoholic drinks without eating.
  • Symptoms include
  • Shaking
  • Sweating
  • Fast Heartbeat
  • Hunger
  • The suggested treatment is to eat 10 15 grams
    of simple sugar such
  • as ½ cup of regular pop or juice or 3-5
    candies or 3 glucose tablets.
  • Follow-up with an extra snack if your usual meal
    is more than 1 hour
  • away.
  • Who is at risk?
  • Some risk factors cannot be altered. For
    example, youre at higher
  • risk for developing type 2 diabetes if
  • You are over 40 years old

North Shore Family Health Team
16
PAGE - 29 -
PAGE - 30 -
  • Blood Pressure Control
  • High blood pressure may cause you serious health
    problems such as
  • a stroke and may cause you to develop
    complications from the
  • diabetes more quickly. It is easier to control
    your blood pressure
  • when your weight is in a healthy range (see BMI).
  • Blood Glucose Control
  • Having diabetes means having large amounts of
    glucose in the blood.
  • High glucose levels over longer period of time
    have been proven to
  • cause the complications of diabetes. It may be
    possible to delay or
  • even prevent these problems by keeping your
    glucose levels within a
  • normal range. Your glucose levels should be
    within 4 7 mmol/L
  • before meals although not lower, which can be
    difficult.
  • How well your blood glucose level is controlled
    can be tested in two
  • ways
  • Glucose Meters
  • A blood glucose meter is an instrument that you
    may use to test your
  • blood glucose levels at home. All you need is a
    drop of blood from
  • your finger tip and a test strip available from
    your drug store.
  • Self testing is essential if you are using
    insulin and is very useful if
  • you are taking oral agents or controlling your
    diabetes by diet and
  • exercise. Testing will help you to adjust your
    treatment.
  • How often you test will vary based on your
    treatment and how closely
  • you wish to control your glucose levels. You may
    test as few as 5
  • times a week or as many as 50. The accuracy of
    these tests depends
  • on your meter, test strips and know-how.
  • To be sure that your results are true, bring your
    meter to the lab when
  • you have a lab blood glucose test and do a test
    yourself with your
  • meter within 5 minutes of your lab blood test.
    The result of the test
  • using your meter should be within 15 of the lab
    test results. It is a
  • good idea to do this check every 4 6 months.

North Shore Family Health Team
17
PAGE - 31 -
PAGE - 32 -
  • when your low density lipoprotein (LDL),
    sometimes called bad
  • cholesterol, is too high. This allows fatty
    deposits to line your artery
  • walls. A stroke or heart attack may result.
    High density lipoprotein
  • (HDL), also called good cholesterol, helps to
    carry cholesterol to the
  • liver to be broken down and excreted.
  • Serum cholesterol is the total amount of
    cholesterol in your blood. It
  • includes both HDL and LDL. You can lower your
    serum cholesterol
  • level by eating fewer foods that contain
    saturated fats.
  • Kidney Tests
  • Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic
    nephropathy. It develops
  • slowly over many years without warning signs.
    Symptoms do not occur
  • until the disease is far advanced but tests can
    help detect early signs.
  • Creatinine Clearance measures your kidneys
    ability to filter waste
  • products
  • Foot Care
  • As a complication of diabetes, blood may not flow
    normally to your
  • feet. When this happens, you do not fight
    infections as well or heal as
  • easily. The nerves going to your feet may also
    be affected by your
  • diabetes, so you will have reduced feeling and
    you may experience
  • numbness and tingling. These changes may prevent
    you from feeling
  • pain or injury to your feet. Have your feet
    examined each year by a
  • health care professional.
  • These tips will help you to best protect your
    feet
  • 1. DO NOT SMOKE
  • 2. Walk within your limits, but WALK.
  • 3. Never go barefoot. Always wear socks. When
    you have to get up
  • at night, turn on the lights and wear
    slippers. At the beach, always
  • wear beach shoes, even when you are in the
    water.

North Shore Family Health Team
18
PAGE - 33 -
PAGE - 34 -
  • your elbow to avoid burns.
  • 8. Trim your toe nails straight across or in
    contour never down to the
  • corners or below the end of your toes. DO
    NOT PEEL OR PULL BACK
  • NAILS.
  • 9. Corns or calluses should only be treated by a
    health care professional.
  • 10. Inspect your feet daily for cuts, bruises,
    blisters, infection or changes in
  • skin colouring. If you find an injury,
    swelling, redness, sores, change in
  • colour, or if you have pain, see your doctor
    or foot care specialist right
  • away.
  • Eye Assessment
  • Have your eyes examined at least once a year. A
    thorough check-up will
  • include an examination of the retina as well as
    checking for cataracts and
  • glaucoma. Be sure to tell your optometrist or
    ophthalmologist that you have
  • 3. PRE-PROLIFERATIVE/PROLIFERATIVE damage is of
    concern and
  • requires follow-up.
  • For proper eye examination, your pupils will need
    to be dilated by adding
  • special drops to your eyes. After the test, your
    vision may be blurred for a
  • few hours, so make sure you do not need to drive
    soon after the test. Your
  • eyes may also be more sensitive to light, so you
    may wish to wear
  • sunglasses.
  • Cataracts
  • The lens in your eye, which is normally clear,
    may become cloudy and
  • interfere with your vision. New medical
    techniques can remove the clouded
  • lens and a new artificial clear lens may be
    implanted to help your vision.
  • Or, special glasses may be worn to correct your
    vision.
  • Glaucoma
  • Glaucoma is the result of steady build up of
    pressure inside the eye. Two

North Shore Family Health Team
19
PAGE - 35 -
PAGE - 36 -
  • What About Weight?
  • Body Mass Index (BMI) is a useful indicator of
    whether your weight is within
  • a healthy range.
  • Its easy to find your BMI
  • 1. Mark an X at your height on line A.
  • 2. Mark an X at your weight on line B.
  • 3. Take a ruler and join the two Xs.
  • 4. To find your BMI, extend the line to line C.
  • FOR EXAMPLE If you are 511 (1.8m) and weigh
    190 lbs. (86.4 kg),
  • your BMI is about 26.

Under 20 A BMI under 20 may be associated with health problems for some individuals. It may be a good idea to consult a dietitian or a physician for advice. Underweight
20-25 This zone is associated with the lowest risk of illness for most people. This is the range you want to stay in. N
25-27 A BMI over 25 may be associated with health problems for some people. Caution is suggested if your BMI is in this zone. Overweight
Over 27 A BMI over 27 is associated with increased risk of health problems such as heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It may be a good idea to consult a dietitian or a physician for advice. Obese
IF YOU FALL BELOW 20 OR ABOVE 27 ON THE BMI RANGEIts time to reduce your risk of developing health problems. The first and most important thing is to determine why you are not within the healthy weight range and seek the assistance of your physician and dietitian/nutritionist.
North Shore Family Health Team
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PAGE - 37 -
PAGE - 38 -
  • EATING BETTER, FEELING BETTER
  • Eating better helps you to gain better control of
    your blood glucose and fat
  • levels, to reach and maintain a healthy weight
    and to stay healthy you may
  • want to speak to a dietitian to help you plan
    healthy meals.
  • Eating Better Means
  • Choose 3 out of the 4 key food groups at each
    meal
  • - Starch - Protein
  • - Fruits Vegetables - Milk
  • Watch portion size.
  • Eat at regular times. Have 3 meals a day
    (including breakfast) and space your meals 4 6
    hours apart from each other.
  • Choose high fibre food like whole grain breads
    and cereals, fresh fruit, vegetables and legumes.
  • Make lower fat choices. Use low fat dairy
    products and choose lean meat. Trim fat from
    meat, chicken, etc., and cut down on added fat
    like butter and salad dressings.
  • How Often Should Lab tests Be Done?
  • The following schedule may be used as a guideline
    to chart your routine
  • medical/lab visits.
  • Each time that you have one of these test done,
    place a check mark in the
  • box beside the test name. Year by year, you will
    easily be able to see if you
  • have had all of your tests. For information on
    any of these tests, see the
  • pages in the back of this booklet.

How Often? Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
Blood Pressure q 3-4 mths ???? ???? ???? ???? ????
BLOOD TEST HbA1C q 3-4 mths ???? ???? ???? ???? ????
Lab Meter/ Glucometer Checkk q 6 mths ??? ??? ??? ??? ???
Fasting Blood Glucose Once a yr ? ? ? ? ?
KIDNEY Microalbuminuria Once a yr ? ? ? ? ?
LIPIDS Total Cholesterol Once a yr ? ? ? ? ?
HDL Cholesterol Once a yr ? ? ? ? ?
LDL Cholesterol Once a yr ? ? ? ? ?
Triglycerides Once a yr ? ? ? ? ?
Foot Exam Once a yr ? ? ? ? ?
Eye Exam Once a yr ? ? ? ? ?
North Shore Family Health Team
21
PAGE - 39 -
PAGE - 40 -
  • Travel Advice
  • Be sure to plan your trips well. If you are
    using insulin, have your doctor fill
  • out the Travel Certificate on the following page
    in order to avoid any
  • troubles at Customs.
  • Everyone who has diabetes should keep these tips
    in mind
  • Take some food with you in case a meal is
    delayed, or in case the trip is longer than you
    thought.
  • Carry extras of all your drugs those you take
    for your diabetes, any other drugs you usually
    take and any you may need at unexpected times
    such as antidiarrheal or pain relieving drugs.
  • A time difference of more than 3 hours may
    require that you adjust your insulin dose.
    Discuss this with your diabetes team.
  • ?
  • TRAVEL CERTIFICATE
  • This document certifies that
  • _________________________________
  • has diabetes mellitus
  • and requires insulin injections.
  • This justifies the need to carry insulin,
    syringes,
  • glucose meter and test strips at all times.
  • Date _____________________________________
  • Dr. (Signature) _____________________________
  • Telephone _________________________________

North Shore Family Health Team
22
MEDICAL INFORMATION
Heart Stroke
Risk Factors ................................................................. Page 41
Blood Pressure ........................... Page 42
Cholesterol ............................................................... Page 43

Immunizations
Immunization ............................................................ Page 45
Immunization Schedule ............................. Page 46

Mental Health Page 48

Screening
Screening Information ...................................................... Page 51
Breast Cancer ................................................... Page 52
Cervical Cancer ............................................................... Page 52
Colon Cancer ............................................................... Page 53
Prostate/Testicular Cancer ................................... Page 54
Skin Cancer ................................................... Page 55
North Shore Family Health Team
23
PAGE - 41 -
PAGE - 42 -
  • HEART STROKE
  • Risk Factors
  • Cardiovascular Module
  • Risk factors for prevention of Heart Disease and
    Stroke.
  • Non-Modifiable
  • Although these risk factors cannot change for
    prevention of stroke or heart
  • disease it is important to be aware of them
  • Age Women on average develop heart disease 10
    years later than men however menopausal women
    have an increased risk of high blood pressure and
    cholesterol which increases their risk of heart
    disease or stroke.
  • Ethnicity Increased risk for persons of African
    American, First Nations/Aboriginal and Inuit
    Canadians for heart disease. Although persons of
    Asian descent have a lower risk for heart disease
    they have an increased risk for stroke.
  • Family History Positive family history of heart
    disease or stroke at an early age may mean
    increased risk of developing heart disease or
    stroke than those individuals with no family
    history.
  • Gender Men increased risk than females.
    However, post menopausal women are at increased
    risk of heart disease or stroke.
  • Modifiable Risk Factors
  • Blood Pressure Get your blood pressure tested
    and ensure that your blood pressure is in the
    target range take your blood pressure medication
    regularly to help control your blood pressure.
  • Cholesterol levels have your cholesterol levels
    checked to make sure that your levels are at
    target range.
  • with diabetes.
  • Dietary strategies follow a low fat, low salt
    diet eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole
    grains, lean meat, fish and poultry. Limit fast
    foods, canned foods or foods that are bought
    prepared.
  • Smoking quitting smoking can lower your risk of
    developing heart disease or prevent a stroke.
    Smoking cessation counselling is a program that
    is offered by the North Shore Family Health Team.
  • Activity regular physical activity for 30 to 60
    mins. for 4 7 days per week.
  • Blood Pressure
  • Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)
  • One of the leading causes of death in Canada.
    Hypertension is a risk factor
  • for stroke, heart attacks, heart and kidney
    failure.
  • What is Blood Pressure Blood pressure consists
    of two measurements
  • the pressure in the heart when it contracts
    (Systolic) and when the heart
  • relaxes and fills with blood (Diastolic).
  • Blood pressure is measured with two numbers, for
    example 120/80.
  • Systolic pressure is represented by the first
    number and Diastolic is the
  • second number.

North Shore Family Health Team
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PAGE - 43 -
PAGE - 44 -
  • Management of blood pressure
  • Physical Exercise regular exercise 30 to 60
    minutes of exercise 4-7 days per week.
  • Weight reduction BMI lt25.
  • Alcohol consumption - lt2 drinks/day
  • Dietary strategies variety of fruits,
    vegetables, low fat dietary products, high fibre,
    and salt reduction lt100 mmol/day (1tsp)
  • Smoking cessation
  • Stress management
  • Medications are added when the above strategies
    are unsuccessful in
  • lowering the blood pressure to target goals. It
    is important to note that in
  • order to reach target goals, it may be necessary
    to take more than one
  • medication.
  • Cholesterol
  • Dyslipidemia (elevated cholesterol levels)
  • Cholesterol is a waxy substance that the body
    makes naturally. The body
  • does need some cholesterol to work properly and
    it can make what it
  • treatment plan to lower your cholesterol.
  • What are my target cholesterol levels?
  • Target levels are rated according to risk
    factors. Risk factors are based
  • individually and factor in age, blood pressure,
    total cholesterol level, HDL
  • level (good cholesterol), smoking, genetic risk
    and patients with established
  • diabetes or heart disease.
  • Total cholesterol value should be less than 5.2
    mmol/L
  • HDL cholesterol should be greater than 0.9 mmol/L
  • Triglycerides should be less than 2.0 mmol/L
  • LDL and Total Cholesterol HDL ratio is
    determined by calculating your
  • individual risk factors.
  • It is important to have your cholesterol levels
    assessed regularly and
  • reviewed by your health care provider who will
    determine your individual
  • target levels.

North Shore Family Health Team
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PAGE - 45 -
PAGE - 46 -
  • IMMUNIZATIONS
  • Influenza Vaccine (Flu Shot)
  • What is it?
  • A vaccine used to prevent infection caused by
    influenza viruses carried and spread among humans
    every year.
  • The Flu season is usually from November to
    April and then stops.
  • Symptoms include fever, chills, cough, runny
    eyes, stuffy nose, sore throat, headache, muscle
    aches, extreme weakness and fatigue (the elderly
    may not have a fever).
  • The Flu is hardest on people who dont have a
    strong immune system the very young, the very
    old and people with certain chronic illnesses.
  • Get an annual flu shot - this will prevent the
    infection or reduce the severity of the illness.
  • How it is spread?
  • Breathing droplets that are sneezed or coughed
    into the air by someone with the flu, or having
    the droplets land on the surface of your eye.
  • Shaking hands with an infected person or touching
    a contaminated surface or objects and then
    touching your own eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Tips to Prevent the Flu
  • Wash your hands frequently using soap and warm
    water.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you
    sneeze or cough.
  • If you dont have a tissue, cough or sneeze into
    your upper sleeve-not into your hands.
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (Pneumonia
    Shot)
  • What is it?
  • A vaccine used to protect people over the age of
    65 years from a bacteria that can cause bacterial
    pneumonia or septicaemia (a bacterial infection
    of the blood) or meningitis (a bacterial
    infection of the membranes and fluid covering the
    brain and spinal cord).
  • You should receive one dose of the vaccine at 65
    years and a single re-immunization is recommended
    after 5 years.
  • How it is spread?
  • The bacteria are spread from one person to
    another by coughing, sneezing or close
    face-to-face contact. It can also be spread
    through saliva or spit.
  • Tetanus and Diphtheria (Td) Vaccine
  • Adults should receive a Td booster every 10 years
    to protect against the
  • Tetanus and Diphtheria diseases.
  • What is it?
  • Tetanus (lockjaw) is a serious disease. The
    illness starts with headache and very stiff jaw
    muscles followed by a stiff neck, difficulty
    swallowing, stiff stomach muscles, inability to
    control muscles (spasms), sweating and fever.
    Tetanus kills 2 out of every 10 people who get
    the disease.
  • Diphtheria is a serious disease. The bacteria
    cause fever and a thick coating in the nose,
    throat and airway that result in breathing
    problems, heart failure and nerve damage.
    Diphtheria kills 1 out of every 10 people who get
    the disease.
  • How it is spread?
  • Tetanus is caused by germs that enter the body
    through a cut or wound. The germs may be found
    everywhere including soil, dust and animal
    manure.
  • Diphtheria spreads when the bacteria pass from
    the nose, throat or skin of one person to
    another.

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PAGE - 48 -
  • Hepatitis Vaccinations
  • Hepatitis A and B are infectious diseases caused
    by viruses that cause the
  • liver to become inflamed. Immunization may be
    recommended if you are at
  • risk of infection due to travel or direct contact
    with blood or body fluids. Talk
  • to your health care provider for more
    information.
  • Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults
  • MENTAL HEALTH/ADDICTIONS
  • Mental Health involves finding a balance in all
    aspects of your life
  • physically, mentally, emotionally and
    spiritually. It is the ability to enjoy life
  • and deal with the challenges you face everyday.
    It is natural to feel off
  • balance at times and experience emotions such as
    sadness, worry and
  • anger. However, if these feelings interfere with
    your daily life or
  • relationships then there may be problems.
  • One in five people in Canada experience a mental
    health problem during
  • their lifetime. Only about 30 seek help.
  • Would you try to deal with a heart condition on
    your own? Mental
  • health problems can be just as serious as
    physical problems and getting
  • medical attention and other help is just as
    important. The earlier you get
  • help, the less chance of the problem coming back
    or getting worst.
  • If you are not sure you need help, talk to your
    health care provider or social
  • worker at the Family Health Team.

Vaccine Who When
Influenza (flu shot) All Adults Annually
Pneumococcal Polysoccharide Individuals gt 65 years All residents of nursing homes and chronic care facilities Individuals with certain medical conditions One dose Booster x1 after 5 years
Tetanus, Diphtheria (Td) All Adults Every 10 years
Hepatitis High-Risk Individuals Follow-up with Health Care Provider
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PAGE - 50 -
  • Bipolar Disorder Involves extreme mood swings
    that may have nothing
  • to do with what is going on in the persons life.
    Typically people with a
  • bipolar disorder move between feeling normal,
    feeling very low or
  • depressed, and feeling very high or manic.
    Bipolar disorders affect about
  • 1 of the population.
  • Depression Involves feeling abnormally sad,
    despairing and hopeless
  • fairly consistently for over two weeks. Other
    feelings could include
  • irritability, worthlessness or guilt, or a
    general loss of interest in life. Often a
  • persons performance at work or in relationships
    is impaired. Sleep,
  • energy, appetite, concentration, memory and
    sexual desire may be
  • affected. Depression can lead to thoughts of
    suicide. About one in ten
  • people are diagnosed with depression, however it
    is estimated that many
  • people with depression go undiagnosed. At any
    given time, almost three
  • million Canadians are affected by a serious
    depression.
  • Personality Disorder A person behaves and
    communicates in ways that
  • are very different form what is expected in
    society. A person may have
  • problems with self-image or having successful
    relationships. They may
  • Taking Care of your Mental Health
  • Understand Stress 43 of adults suffer adverse
    health effects from
  • stress. 75-90 of all physician office visits
    are for stress-related ailments
  • and complaints. Stress is linked to the six
    leading causes of death heart
  • disease, cancer, lung ailments, accidents,
    cirrhosis of the liver and suicide.
  • Think healthy The same situation will affect
    people differently depending
  • on their interpretation. Learn to interpret
    situations in a manner that helps
  • you feel good. Be aware of thinking errors
    (patterns of thinking that help us
  • feel bad). Monitor your automatic thinking you
    might be unconsciously
  • thinking about negative situations or events,
    which will affect your mood.
  • Be social Humans are social animals, although
    we are capable of
  • solitude, we also have social needs. When these
    needs are not fulfilled,
  • emotional difficulties often result.
  • Choose a Sustaining Lifestyle This includes
    eating healthy, getting
  • plenty of exercise, sleeping regularly, limiting
    caffeine, alcohol and avoid

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  • SCREENING INFO
  • Reducing your risk of Cancer
  • There are many good reasons to take charge of
    your health. As we grow
  • older, the risk of developing a chronic disease
    like cancer increases.
  • Understanding whats normal for your body is an
    important part of staying
  • healthy. So take control of your health by
    getting to know your body,
  • learning the warning signs of cancer and
    following a healthy lifestyle.
  • At least 50 of cancers can be prevented through
    healthy living and
  • policies that protect the public. Take these
    steps now to reduce your risk of
  • developing cancer.
  • 1. Be a non-smoker and avoid second-hand smoke.
  • 2. Eat 5 to 10 servings of vegetables and fruit
    a day. Choose high fibre,
  • lower fat foods. If you drink alcohol,
    limit your intake to 1 to 2 drinks a
  • day.
  • 3. Be physically active on a regular basis this
    will also help you maintain a
  • healthy body weight.
  • 4. Protect yourself and your family from the
    sun, particularly between 11
  • Breast Cancer
  • Breast cancer starts in the cells of the breast
    and extends from the
  • collarbone to under the armpit and across the
    breastbone to the
  • center of the chest. Breast cancer is the most
    common cancer
  • found in women and rarely found in men. Breast
    cancer can occur
  • at any age but most cases occur over the age of
    50.
  • What can you do?
  • Clinical breast exam every two years by a
    trained health care professional after the age of
    40.
  • Mammograms every two years after the age of 50
    years or sooner if family history of breast
    cancer.
  • Talk to you health care provider about your
    personal risks of breast cancer and the benefits
    of mammograms.
  • If you have a family history of breast cancer you
    may want to consider screening sooner.
  • What to watch for? See your health care provider
    if you have
  • A lump or swelling in the armpit
  • Changes in breast size or shape
  • Dimpling or puckering of the skin
  • Redness, swelling and increased warmth in the
    affected breast
  • Inverted nipple nipple turned inwards

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PAGE - 54 -
  • infection
  • Consider the HPV vaccine if you are between the
    age of 9 and 26 years of age to protect against
    the strains that can cause cancer and prevent
    genital warts.
  • What to watch for? See your health care provider
    if you have
  • Abnormal bleeding from between periods
  • Unusually long or heavy periods
  • Bleeding after sex
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Watery or increased discharge from the vagina
  • Bleeding from the vagina after menopause
  • Colon Cancer
  • Colorectal cancers start in the cells that line
    the inside of the colon and
  • rectum. It is the third most common cancer in
    Canada for both men and
  • women. Screening tests can help find the
    colorectal cancer early before
  • symptoms develop and lead to successful
    treatment.
  • What can you do?
  • Fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) every 2 years
    if you are 50 years of age or over.
  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Prostate Cancer
  • Prostate cancer starts in the cells of the
    prostate gland. It is the most
  • common cancer in Canadian men over the age of 65.
    Family history of
  • prostate cancer or men of African descent are at
    a higher risk of developing
  • prostate cancer.
  • Tests used for early detection of prostate
    cancer
  • Digital rectal exam (DRE)
  • Prostate specific antigen (PSA) test
  • What to watch for? See your health care provider
    if you have
  • Increased frequency of urination, especially at
    night
  • An intense need to urinate
  • Difficulty stopping or starting the urine flow
  • An inability to urinate
  • Weak or decreased urine stream

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PAGE - 55 -
  • include a testicular exam
  • What to watch for? See your health care provider
    if you have
  • Lump on your testicle
  • Painful testicle
  • Feeling of heaviness in the lower abdomen or
    scrotum
  • Dull ache in the lower abdomen or groin
  • Skin Cancer
  • Types of skin cancer are basal cell, squamous
    cell and melanoma. Basal
  • and squamous cell skin cancers are common in
    Canada and can be treated
  • successfully.
  • What can you do?
  • Avoid excessive exposure to sun
  • Use a sunscreen with a sun protection factor
    (SPF) of 15 or higher
  • Cover your arms, legs and head when out in the
    sun
  • Wear sunglasses with UVA and UVB protection
  • Avoid using tanning equipment

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MEDICAL INFORMATION
Smoking Cessation
Facts ................................................................. Page 56
Benefits of Quitting Smoking ............................ Page 56
How to Quit ............................................................... Page 58

Nutrition Guidelines
Healthy Eating ............................................................. Page 60

Resources
Local ....................................................... Page 63
Hours ...................................................... Page 64
Internet .................................................................. Page 65
Acknowledgements .......................................................... Page 66
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PAGE - 57 -
  • SMOKING CESSATION
  • Facts about Smoking
  • Tobacco smoke contains 4000 chemicals, 50 of
    these are known to cause cancer.
  • 18 of Canadians aged 15 and over are smokers.
  • More than 45,000 Canadians die each year from
    smoking related causes.
  • Smoking causes most cases of chronic bronchitis
    and emphysema and is a major cause of heart
    disease and stroke.
  • Smoking is estimated to be responsible for 30 of
    all cancer deaths and is related to more than 85
    of lung cancer in Canada.
  • It can also increase the risk of developing
    cancer of the bladder, cervix, colon and rectum,
    oesophagus, kidney, larynx, mouth and throat,
    pancreas and stomach.
  • Facts about Second Hand Smoke
  • Regular exposure to second hand smoke is
    estimated to cause up to 7,800 deaths a year.
  • Second hand smoke is a contributing factor for
    SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).
  • 13 of childrens ear infections are caused by
    second hand smoke.
  • Exposure to second hand smoke increases a non
    smokers chance of lung cancer by 25.
  • Exposure to second hand smoke increases a non
    smokers chance of cardio vascular disease by
    20-50.
  • BENEFITS OF QUITTING SMOKING
  • Short-Term Health Benefits
  • the body begins to heal immediately after
    quitting may help motivate those
  • who havent shown previous interest in quitting.
  • The short-term health benefits of quitting
    include

Time Lapse Short-Term Health Benefits
Within 20 minutes Heart rate drops Blood pressure and pulse rate return to normal
Within 8 hours Blood levels of nicotine and carbon monoxide drop Oxygen levels return to normal
Within 24 hours Carbon monoxide leaves the body Lungs start to clear out mucus
Within 48 hours Nicotine has left the body Senses of smell and taste begin to improve
Within 72 hours Lung capacity increases and breathing becomes easier Bronchial tubes begin to relax and energy levels increase
Within 2 weeks to 3 months Circulation improves Lung function increases
Within 6 months Coughing, sinus congestion, tiredness and shortness of breath improve
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  • person-to-person contact are effective.
    Behavioural counselling can be
  • used alone or to be more effective can be
    supported with pharmaceutical
  • aids.
  • Pharmaceutical Aids
  • NRT (Nicotine Replacement Therapy) which includes
    nicotine gum,
  • patches and nicotine inhaler helps relieve the
    discomfort of physical
  • withdrawal, reduces cravings by supplying the
    brain with some nicotine and
  • offers a cleaner system of delivery than
    cigarette smoke.
  • Bupropion is found under the trade mark names of
    Zyban or Wellbutrin and
  • is a nicotine free pill that helps reduce the
    cravings caused by nicotine
  • withdrawal.
  • Champix is a nicotine-free pill that can help
    relieve the cravings and
  • withdrawal symptoms associated with stopping
    smoking.
  • Champix can increase the odds of quitting by 4
    times
  • Bupropion can increase the odds of quitting by
    2.1 times
  • Long-Term Health Benefits
  • Quitting smoking for good substantially reduces
    the risk of serious illness for
  • all smokers.
  • The long-term health benefits of quitting
    include

Time Lapse Long-Term Health Benefits
At 1 year Excess risk of coronary heart disease is decreased to half that of a smoker
At 5 to 15 years Risk of stroke is reduced to that of people who have never smoked
At 10 years Risk of lung cancer drops to one-half that of continuing smokers Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, oesophagus, bladder, kidney and pancreas decreases Risk of ulcers decreases
At 15 years Risk of coronary heart disease is similar to that of people who have never smoked Risk of death returns to nearly the level of people who have never smoked
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  • NUTRITIONAL GUIDELINES
  • HEALTHY EATING
  • Healthy eating is one step in improving your
    overall health. Achieve and
  • maintain a healthy body weight by enjoying
    regular physical activity and
  • healthy eating.
  • Reduce fat intake.
  • 1. Choose foods that are lower in saturated
    fat, trans fat and cholesterol.
  • Saturated fat is found in animal based foods,
    such as meat and dairy
  • products, as well as tropical fats, such as
    coconut and palm oil. Trans fat
  • is found in hard margarine and some processed
    foods, such as store-
  • bought cookies and crackers. Trans fat is also
    known as hydrogenated
  • margarine or vegetable shortening. Cholesterol
    is found only in animal
  • foods such as meats, eggs and dairy products.
  • 2. Use mono- and polyunsaturated fats for
    flavour. These fats are
  • found mostly in plant foods, such as canola oil
    and peanut butter, and can
  • be used regularly in small amounts. Omega-3 fat,
    an unsaturated fat found
  • Increase the amount of dietary fibre in your
    diet.
  • 1. Aim for 35 grams of fibre daily.
  • 2. Choose whole grain breads, cereals and pasta
    and brown rice more
  • often.
  • 3. Sprinkle wheat germ or bran on cereals,
    salads and yogurt.
  • 4. Eat more fruit and vegetables every day.
  • 5. Snack on raw fruits and vegetables and
    whole-grain crackers.
  • Consume enough, but not excess protein.
  • Limit protein to 2-3 oz. (50-70g) portion of
    meat, fish, poultry or low-fat
  • cheese twice a day.
  • Limit sodium or salt intake.
  • 1. Limit the amount of salt that you use in
    cooking and at the table.
  • 2. Reduce intake of processed meats,
    high-sodium condiments such as
  • soy sauce, MSG, and convenience foods.
  • 3. Try using spices and herbs more often in
    cooking.
  • 4. Prepare fresh foods simply and enjoy the
    natural flavours.

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  • Healthy eating is the total of all food choices
    made over time. It is the
  • overall pattern of foods eaten and not any one
    food, meal or even days
  • meals that determine if an eating pattern is
    healthy.
  • It is important to remember that no food is bad
    for you all foods can fit into
  • a healthy diet with a little planning. Enjoy
    favourite high energy, high fat
  • foods BUT less often and in smaller portions.
  • LOCAL RESOURCES
  • Phone Numbers
  • North Shore Family Health Team
  • J.E. Stokes Medical Centre 824-2934
  • 824-2952
  • Aguasabon Medical Clinic 825-3235
  • Thunder Bay District Health Unit 824-2413
  • Stewart Pharmacy 825-3666
  • Optometrists
  • Dr. D. Buckton Dr. M. White
    825-2586
  • Dentists
  • Mountain View Dental (Schreiber) 824-2964
  • The McCausland Hospital 825-3273
  • Hospice Ext. 136
  • Dietitian Ext. 191
  • Lab Ext. 156
  • X-Ray Ext. 154
  • Northern Diabetes Health Network (NDHN)
    Ext. 138
  • Physiotherapy 825-2200

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PAGE - 65 -
  • LOCAL RESOURCES Hours of Operation
  • NORTH SHORE FAMILY HEALTH TEAM
  • J.E. Stokes Medical Centre
  • Monday, Wednesday Thursday
  • 900 a.m. to 400 p.m.
  • Lunch 1200 p.m. to 100 p.m.
  • Tuesday
  • 900 a.m. to 630 p.m.
  • Lunch 1200 p.m. to 100 p.m.
  • Friday
  • 900 a.m. to 1200 p.m.
  • Aguasabon Medical Clinic
  • Monday to Thursday
  • 900 a.m. to 400 p.m.
  • Lunch 1200 p.m. to 100 p.m.
  • INTERNET RESOURCES
  • Arthritis - www.arthritis.ca
  • Alzheimers www.alzheimerthunderbay.ca
  • Cancer www.cancercare.on.ca
  • Heart/Stroke www.heartandstroke.ca
  • Lung Cancer www.lung.ca/breathworks/
  • Mayo Clinic www.mayoclinic.com
  • Patient Education www.cfpc.ca
  • (College of Physicians Surgeons
  • Click for patients/patient education programs)
  • Hospice Northwest www.hospicenorthwest.ca
  • Anxiety Disorder www.anxietyontario.com
  • www.mooddisorder.on.ca
  • www.medic.ca
  • www.schizophienia.on.ca
  • Center for Additions and Mental Health -
    www.cgmh.net
  • Canadian Mental Health Associates www.cmha.ca

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  • Special Acknowledgement
  • to the North Shore Family Health Team
  • for their dedication, time and commitment
  • to the development of the
  • Passport to Health booklet,
  • a medical journal created for you.
  • References
  • Thunder Bay District Health Unit
  • The McCausland Hospital
  • Canadian Cancer Society
  • The Lung Association
  • Ontario Breast Screening Foundation
  • Heart Stroke Foundation
  • NOTES
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  • NOTES
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  • Special Features
  • Front
  • Leaflet for Appt. Cards
    ,
  • OHIP Card , etc
  • Middle
  • 2 Dividers Patient Medical Records (green)
  • Medical Information (orange)
  • Back Cover
  • Pocket for Immunization Card,
  • Blood Pressure Card, etc

Space provided for pt. identification (name).
North Shore Family Health Team
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The Passport to Health Booklets were
  • Contact Information
  • The Print Shop
  • Attn Mona Donaldson
  • Terrace Bay, ON
  • Phone (807) 825-9425
  • Fax (807) 825-9458

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  • The North Shore Family Health Team
  • would like to Thank you for viewing our project,
  • The Passport to Health Medical Journal.
  • If you have any questions,
  • please feel free to contact The Team
  • _at_
  • (807) 824-2934 (807) 824-2952
  • or via e-mail
  • schreibermed_at_yahoo.ca

North Shore Family Health Team
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