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Supply Chain Talent

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... may provide too little upstream ... Board Strategic Research April 2007 ... .org/galleries/public-gallery/SupplyChainTalent_StateoftheDiscipline.pdf ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Supply Chain Talent


1
Supply Chain Talent
  • Where do you find it? How do you find it?
  • What is it?
  • Matching Demand and Supply at the Skills Level

2
Presenter
  • Nick Little, MCIPS
  • Assistant Director, Executive Development
    Programs
  • The Eli Broad Graduate School of Management
  • Michigan State University
  • littlen_at_bus.msu.edu

3
Global Supply Chain Professional Development
Committee
Companies
Boeing
IBM
Intel
Molson Coors
Philips Lighting
Procter Gamble
Whirlpool
DoD, Func. Req Office
Universities/Associations
Arizona State University
Council of Supply Chain Professionals
Howard University
Michigan State University
Penn State University
Supply Chain Council AMR Research
4
Background 3 Key Questions
  • Are companies clearly articulating the critical
    required skills to adapt their Supply Chain
    Programs accordingly ?
  • Are the skills that are being developed by
    universities and institutes consistent with these
    company requirements?
  • Are Associations a critical point of
    collaboration in this process?

5
Presentation Outline
  • What has changed?
  • The emerging challenge.
  • Work in Progress.
  • Next steps

6
The Globally Integrated Enterprise
An enterprise integrated into the fabric of the
new global economy
  • Multinational corporations evolving to new form
  • Driven by adopting to forces of globalization
  • Leveraging standards, componentization,
    collaboration
  • Outsourcing results in new enterprise structure
  • View themselves as an array of specialized
    components
  • Chose where they want the work to be performed
  • Whether performed in house or by an outside
    partner
  • Need new ways to manage
  • Permit new business models, faster innovation
  • Enormous benefits to developed developing
    nations

7
At IBM, Global Integration Began With Supply Chain
IBM Integrated Supply Chain
  • 39B annual spend
  • 17,000 employees in 61 countries
  • 45,000 business partners and 33,000 suppliers
  • 9 manufacturing plants on 3 continents
  • Three Global Procurement and 14 Customer
    Fulfillment centers
  • 37 Logistics Centers that move more than 2
    billion pounds of machines and parts annually

8
A Globally Integrated Supply Chain delivers many
advantages over a traditional supply chain
approach
The traditional supply chain is linear and siloed
Suppliers
Vendors
Customer alignment
Outsourcing partners
OEMs
Vendors and suppliers
Market research
RD / product design
OEMs
Mfg.design / engineering
Manufacturing design/ engineering
RD / product design
Customer order management
Procurement
Procurement
Manufacturing
Logistics
Manufacturing

Logistics
Other 3rd parties
Other partners
Traditional supply chain
Globally Integrated Supply Chain
  • Functional departments are kept isolated, despite
    working along the same chain
  • Separation has important benefits, but it leads
    to a lack of collaboration, information
    mismanagement
  • Throw it over the wall departments complete
    their portion of the process without a
    comprehensive hand-off or sharing of information
  • Receiving departments may provide too little
    upstream
  • Immediately responds to all customer demands
  • Continues to optimally synchronize its network
    with the market place
  • Integrates across the entire business from
    customer, partners, supplier and service
    providers
  • Companies with high performance supply chains
    carry less inventory, have shorter cash-to-cash
    cycle times and are more profitable

Source The AMR Research Supply Chain Top 25
and the New Trillion-Dollar Opportunity AMR
Research.
9
The World of Work
  • Then
  • Monday-Friday workweek
  • Fixed continuous schedules (8-5)
  • Fixed/continuous work locations w/ direct peer to
    peer and management engagement.
  • Stable, intact teams predominantly nationally
    focused, within same time zones
  • Global interactions primarily at Sr. Staff Levels
  • Constrained availability and use of flexibility
    tools.
  • Now The New Normal
  • Weekends, local holidays and vacation days
  • Variable non-continuous work schedules early
    morning, late evening meetings
  • Work at home, mobile and client location
    workforce
  • Integrated, variable, virtual global teams
  • Global interaction/dependencies at all levels of
    the business
  • Low cost technology drives 24/7/365 culture

9
10
Our Talents Diversity
Each generation in the workplace comes with its
own sets of experiences and expectations that
occasionally conflict with one another
Traditionalist Gen X Gen Y
Training The hard way Required to keep me Continuous expected
Learning style Classroom Independent Collaborative networked
Communication style Top down Hub Spoke Collaborative
Problem-solving Hierarchical Independent Collaborative
Decision-making Seeks Approval Team included Team decided
Leadership style Command control Coach Partner
Feedback No news is good news Weekly / Daily On demand
Technology use Uncomfortable Unable to work without it Unfathomable if not provided
Job changing Unwise Necessary Part of my daily routine
Source Lancaster, L.C. and Stillman, D. When
Generations Collide Who They Are. Why They
Clash. How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at
Work. Wheaton, IL. Harper Business, 2003.
11
The emerging challenge
12
SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 2010 AND BEYOND EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY EUROPE JUNE 2007
  • The survey instrument served as a mechanism to
    identify the most critical issues facing supply
    chain managers in 2010 and beyond. The results
    of the study showed these five issues to be most
    important in the future
  • The lack of appropriate and adequate frameworks
    and terminology for describing supply chain
    management relationships, activities, and major
    constructs.
  • Leadership, talent management, and people within
    the supply chain.
  • Management of knowledge and data both within the
    firm and within the supply chain.
  • Dealing with the influence of cultures (both
    organizational and social) and organization
    structures/infrastructure (involving issues such
    as performance measurement) on both firm and
    supply chain performance.
  • Focusing on processes and collaboration as
    critical elements in enhancing the current and
    future effectiveness of supply chains.
  • Source Michigan State University/IMD SCM 2010
    beyond Mapping the Future of the Strategic
    Supply Chain, May 2007

13
Winning the Supply Chain Talent War in Emerging
Markets Employee Engagement Levers That Improve
Retention and Performance Supply Chain Executive
Board Strategic Research April 2007
14
3 Converging realities
1. Market forces continue to change the
competitive landscape
  • Globalization
  • Outsourcing
  • Increased use of technology / automation
  • End to end integration of functional processes

2. Supply chains need to evolve to keep
businesses competitive
  • Increased Focus on Supply Chain Management to
    Drive Profit Revenue
  • Increased Need for On-Demand Activities
  • Increased Integration of Supply Chain
    Organizations

3. Greater depth and breadth of skills needed by
supply chain employees to be successful in new
mission
15
Key Questions
  • Are companies clearly articulating the critical
    required skills to adapt their Supply Chain
    Programs accordingly ?
  • Are the skills that are being developed by
    universities and institutes consistent with these
    company requirements?
  • Are Associations a critical point of
    collaboration in this process?

16
The Challenge
How do we find Supply Chain Talent if we
arent using a common way of talking about the
SC and the skills Talent Supply Pipeline is
not equal, at present, to the various
industries needs
17
Work in Progress
18
Survey Demographics
  • AMR Research on-line survey commissioned
  • Industry, academia associations steering
    committee
  • 287 responses worldwide (74 North America)
  • SC practitioners, generally Director level up
  • Multiple industry sectors (20 Food CPG)
  • Spread of different sized companies
  • 49 gt 5 billion annual revenue
  • 52 10,000 employees
  • 91 of respondents hired in last year
  • Most companies hired 10 or less in the year

19
Skills Now and in 2010
20
Demand Map
Has ALL the skills
Performance Measurement Analytics
Skills Available
Has SOME of the skills
Source
New Product
Plan
Deliver
Make
Customer Mgmt
Strategy Change Mgmt
Technology Enablement
Post Sales Support
Governance
Has VERY FEW of the skills
Leadership/Strategic
Basic
Intermediate
Advanced
Skills Sought
21
Quality Competency Levels
22
Available from Talent Pool
23
Supply Recruiting Channels
24
Search Focus (NA only)
N153
25
Recruit From
26
North America Supply
27
NW Europe Supply
N25
28
Competencies Attributes
  1. Transportation, Strategic Operational (78)
  2. Logistics Planning and Control (74)
  3. Warehousing, Strategic and Operational (65)
  4. Inventory Management and Control (61)
  5. Delivery Management (58)
  6. Third Party or Outsource Management (51)

No.1
Attributes and Interest Level (N97)
Deliver
78
Of all respondents had this station in their
Supply Chain span of control
  1. Demand Management (86)
  2. Inventory Planning and Optimization (83)
  3. Sales and Operations Planning (71)
  4. Capacity Management (58)
  5. Modeling, What-If Scenarios (55)
  6. Product Portfolio Analysis (33)
  7. New Product Management (31)
  8. Service Offering Development (20)

No.2
Attributes and Interest Level (N125)
Plan
73
Of all respondents had this station in their
Supply Chain span of control
29
Summary
  • SC scope differs enormously due to history and
    other drivers
  • Great variation between universities and also by
    geography
  • Basic curriculum and then specialize?
  • Other skills to supplement and differentiate
  • Detail on SCC web site
  • http//www.supply-chain.org/galleries/public-galle
    ry/SupplyChainTalent_StateoftheDiscipline.pdf

30
Next Steps
  • On-Line Symposium May 2009
  • Practitioner, Associations Academics
  • Objectives
  • Sanity check on SC talent priorities
  • Determine collective strengths to help design
    curriculum
  • Curriculum delivery system ideation
  • Develop and sequence E2E integrated SC competency
    curriculum (grad u-grad)
  • Explore how to leverage strengths yet ensure
    common minimum standards are achievable
  • Communication and governance processes

31
Invitation
  • New perspectives, experience and ideas always
    welcome
  • Join us via LinkedIn Group
  • Please e-mail me for details littlen_at_bus.msu.edu
  • Thank You
  • Questions?
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