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Food Safety and Quality Management

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Quality Management Managing Quality in Food Production Systems Michel Sim on, AFTE1 WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999 1 Managing quality: why? Demand for fruits ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Food Safety and Quality Management


1
Food Safety and Quality Management
  • Managing Quality
  • in Food Production Systems

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
1
2
Managing quality why?
  • Demand for fruits, vegetables and livestock
    products is growing fast
  • Export markets can absorb high value added
    products and bring high returns
  • One key factor is the ability to manage a
    constant level of quality
  • Growing Consumer concern for food safety

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
2
3
Quality Standards in International Trade
  • WTO / SPS Agreement standards set by Codex
    Alimentarius, O.I.E., I.P.P.C.
  • EU harmonization ( standards on raw material,
    process and end product)
  • NAFTA requirements
  • Bilateral requirements
  • ISO Standards

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
3
4
Principle provisions of SPS
  • Applied only to the extent necessary to safeguard
    plant, animal and human health
  • Harmonization, no discrimination
  • Equivalence recognize different systems
  • Risk assessment and determination of
     appropriate level of protection 
  • Adaptation to Regional Conditions

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
4
5
Differences in Policies
  • Large differences exist among similar countries
  • hormones dispute
  • raw-milk cheese
  • animal welfare, child labor
  • Consumer values versus science-based standards

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
5
6
Culture drives policy
  • Framing the problem
  • selective vision  of problems depends on
    culture 
  • the example of Genetically Modified Organisms
    (GMOs) the US focuses on the products while UK
    is concerned with the process, Germany by both

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
6
7
Culture drives policy (2)
  • Styles of regulation
  • differences in public participation
  • conflict resolution political versus judicial
  • Acceptable evidence
  • formal / quantitative versus qualitative
    appraisal
  • measurable risk versus precaution
  • Forms of expertise
  • technical / neutral versus affiliation

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
7
8
Two basic models
  • The old model
  • one by one inspection at the end of the chain
  • zero tolerance
  • The new model
  • quality management throughout the chain
  • standards based on risk assessment

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
8
9
Modern Chain Based Quality Control Systems
  • Total quality control (ISO 9000 series)
  • Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system
    (HACCP)
  • Standard operating procedures (e.g. GMP, GLP, ...)

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
9
10
ISO 9000 A Quality Assurance System
  • ISO 9000 mandates that an organization
  • defines appropriate quality standards,
  • documents its processes, and
  • proves that it consistently adheres to both.
  • ISO 9000 does not specify HOW a particular
    organization should operate!

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
10
11
ISO 9000 Certification
  • Companies can register for ISO 9000
    certification.
  • Assures customers about suppliers capabilities
    and systems to provide quality goods and
    services.
  • The US DoD is switching to ISO 9000
  • EU requires ISO 9000 registration for 35 product
    categories.
  • Japan requires ISO 9000 registration for
    companies wishing to market products and services.

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
11
12
ISO 9000 shortcomings
  • Does not always guarantee high-quality products.
  • ISO 9000 standards focus mainly on traditional
    manufacturing businesses.
  • While improvements can lead to savings and higher
    profits, the cost of ISO 9000 certification is
    over 200,000

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
12
13
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system
  • Control is transferred from end product testing
    to a number of points of the manufacturing chain
    of foods
  • Testing for failure is replaced by preventing
    failure
  • Some end product testing still required for
    on-going verification of the process.

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
13
14
Key features of HACCP
  • It provides a more structured approach than
    traditional procedures.
  • Developed in the 1960s for NASA to guarantee
    total food safety for astronauts
  • Now part of the Codex Alimentarius
  • Now required of all food businesses in Europe
    under EC Directive 93/43.

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
14
15
 The 7 Components of HACCP
  • 1 Conduct a hazard analysis
  • 2 Identify the Critical Control Points
  • 3 Establish target level(s) and tolerance(s)
    for keeping each CCP under control
  • 4 Establish a monitoring system of the CCPs
  • 5 Establish corrective action to be taken when
    a particular CCP is moving out of control
  • 6 Document all procedures and keep records
  • 7 Establish verification procedures

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
15
16
Managing food hazardsElements of effective
programs
  • Sound export / import regulations
  • Up-to-date active disease surveillance and
    information systems
  • Efficiently functioning plant protection and
    veterinary services
  • Alert field professionals and public health
    officials
  • Full cooperation of industries

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
16
17
Areas for World Bank support
  • Policy dialogue and sector work to help client
    countries to
  • Be in a position to influence international
    negotiations and standards setting
  • Adapt ISO 9000 and HACCP to local conditions
  • Develop institutional capacity (public, private)
    through
  • Training in quality management, risk analysis,
    markets requirements, ...
  • Investment in facilities Laboratories, border
    stations, quality testing

Michel Siméon, AFTE1
WB Rural Week, 26 March 1999
17
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