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FST 407: Food Product Development

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PLANT TRIAL DEFINITION After a process has been defined in the pilot plant Before a product launch When you need product for a consumer test WHEN DO YOU RUN A PLANT ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: FST 407: Food Product Development


1
FST 407 Food Product Development
3 units Dr Mrs J. M.
Babajide Department of Food Science and
Technology,University of Agriculture, Abeokuta
2
  • Course requirements
  • CAT 20
  • Course Project 20
  • Exam 60
  • 70 Class attendance compulsory

3

LECTURE 1 Introduction
  • Course Philosophy
  • The commercial end result of Food Science and
    Technology is the delivery of acceptable foods to
    consumers.
  • This course will immerse students in the product
    development process using the product development
    team approach that is prevalent in the food
    industry.
  • Students will be required to acquire the
    knowledge necessary to successfully complete
    their project assignment.
  • As in the industry, achievement of team goals
    will be rewarded.
  •  

4
Expected outcomes for the course.
  • Students must 
  • Be able to identify the processes and stages
    required to bring a new food product from
    conception to commercialization.
  • Have produced in the laboratory a prototype of a
    new product that has a high probability that it
    could be produced commercially.
  • Be aware of the dynamics of working on a product
    development team.
  • 4. Understand how to write a product formula
    and finished product specifications.
  • 5. Know what technical and scientific data must
    be available before a product can be
    manufactured.  
  • 6. Be aware of the dynamics of working on a
    product development team.

5
WHAT IS A PRODUCT ?
  • Product - A product is a good, service, or idea
    consisting of a bundle of tangible and intangible
    attributes that satisfies consumers and is
    received in exchange for money or some other unit
    of value.
  • Product Attributes - The characteristics by which
    products are identified and differentiated.
    Product attributes usually comprise features,
    functions, benefits, and uses.

6
LECTURE 2
  • The Product development process can be divided
    into three segments
  • Concept
  • Prototype
  • Final Product


7
Development of 3 products for concept evaluation
  • Students to
  • Come to the next class with lots of product
    ideas
  • Share your ideas with your team mates
  • and reduce number of ideas
  • Condense the list to 3 by the end of the
  • first laboratory period
  • Begin concept testing during second lab.
  • period

8
Why Group Projects?
  • Students often learn better from each other
  • Work from a well-functioning group is better and
    more complete than any individuals work
  • Develop group interaction skills
  • Real situation in todays food industry

9
LECTURE 3 IDEATION TESTING
  • One of the most important aspects of product
    development in the soundness of the development
    of the concept.
  • Common methods for evaluating concepts include
  • Perceptual Map
  • Gap analysis
  • Product attractiveness score.

10
LECTURE 4 What is a Product Development Process?
  • Stage Gate Process
  • Developed by Robert Cooper/ McGill University
  • Stage-Gate Product Development processes builds
    on Robert Cooper's studies of over 2,000 projects
    to identify the best practices in new product
    development.
  • Stage-Gate is a template, or roadmap, for driving
    new product projects from idea to launch and
    beyond.
  • It is one of the world's most widely used
    processes across multiple industries.

11
What is a Product Development Process?
  • How it works
  • New product development begins with an idea and
    ends with the launch of a new product.
  • The steps between these points can be viewed as
    a systematic product development process. The
    Product Development Process divides these into a
    series of stages.

Stages
Gates
12
Why a Product Development Process?
  • Reduction of Risk
  • Better Management of Resources
  • Repeatability of Development
  • Focus on Decision Making

13
What are the components of a Product Development
Process?
  • Stages
  • Each stage contains a set of prescribed and
    concurrent activities, incorporating industry
    best practices. The activities during a stage are
    executed in parallel, not in sequence.
  • Each stage is preceded by a gate.

14
What are the components of a Product Development
Process?
  • Gates
  • Gates are the points in the process where a
    decision must be made. The gate-keepers can
    choose to Go, Kill, Hold, or Recycle the project.
         
  • It is where project prioritization and resource
    allocation decisions are made. At the end of a
    gate meeting, a decision must be reached. If the
    decision is Go, this ensures resource commitments
    and support from the management.

15
What are the components of a Product Development
Process?
  • Gatekeepers
  • Gatekeepers are the team of senior management
    who make Go/Kill decisions at gates.

16
What does a Typical Stage-Gate Process look
like? Its a Funnel
  • Detail As you move from beginning to end the
    data gets more detailed.
  • Mindset The first few stages focus on
    creativity and new ideas.
  • The last few stages focus on execution and
    analyses.

17
Overview of a Typical Product Development Process
  • Stage 0 Discovery/ Ideation
  • Stage 1 Concept
  • Stage 2 Build Business Case
  • Stage 3 Development
  • Stage 4 Testing Validation
  • Stage 5 Launch
  • Stage 6 Post Launch Audit

18
Key Decisions throughout the Process
  • Stage 0 Idea/ Planning and Situation Analysis
  •         Gate 1 Decision to do a preliminary
    investigationStage 1 Preliminary
    investigation/ Consumer Needs Idea
    Generation        Gate 2 Decision to build a
    business caseStage 2 Detailed investigation
    and business case/ Concept Development
  •         Gate 3 Decision to go into
    developmentStage 3 Development/ Feasibility
    Confirmation        Gate 4 Decision to go into
    testing and validationStage 4 Testing and
    validation/ Scale up Confirmation
  •         Gate 5 Decision to go into full
    production and market launchStage 5 Full
    launch and final report/Product Launch       
    Gate 6 Project Termination
  • Stage 6 Post Launch Audit/ Key Learnings

19
Key Questions to answer all the way through
  • Does Someone want the product?
  • Can We sell the product?
  • Can We make the product?
  • Can We make money at this?

20
LECTURE 5 What Drives Success?
  • 1
  • Unique and Superior Product
  • Differentiated Product
  • Delivers unique Benefits
  • Delivers Superior value to the Consumer

21
What Drives Success?
  • 2 Strong Market Orientation. Market driven and
    consumer focused. --- Good Market research
  • 3 International Orientation
  • Global vs Glocal
  • 4 Pre Development Homework
  • 5 Sharp and Early Product/ Project Definition
  • 6 Well Conceived Market Launch
  • 7 The Right Organizational Structure
  • 8 Top Management Support
  • 9 Leveraging Core Competencies
  • 10 Projects Aimed at Attractive Markets

22
The Cost of being SecondCan be High
Order Entry Sales as of Entrant 1
1 100
2 70-75
3 55-65
4 50-55
5 45-55
6 40-50
23
General Reasons for New Product Failure
  • Citing Reasons for Failure
  • 45 Marketing Analysis
  • 30 Product Problems or Defects
  • 25 Marketing Efforts not Enough
  • 18 Higher Costs than Expected
  • 17 Competitive Strength or Reaction
  • 15 Poor Timing of Introduction
  • 11 Technical or Production Problems
  • 22 All Other
  • Source Robert Cooper 2003

24
LECTURE 6 Turning a Concept into a Product
  • OBJECTIVES
  • TO DETERMINE HOW THE CONCEPT CAN BE TURNED INTO A
    PRODUCT
  • TO OBTAIN AN INITIAL PRODUCT FOR EVALUATION
  • TO UNDERSTAND ALL FACTORS AFFECTING PRODUCT
    ATTRIBUTES
  • TO SCREEN INGREDIENTS AND FORMULATIONS
  • TO ASSESS PROCESSING REQUIREMENTS
  • TO ASSESS PACKAGING AND STORAGE NEEDS

25
Steps in the Process
  • Protocept
  • Prototype
  • Final Product

26
PROTOCEPT DEFINITION
  • A protocept is the product developed in the
    laboratory to meet the promises of the product
    concept
  • Protocept can be developed through interation
    until ready for prototype development
  • Protocepts may not be technically feasible

27
PROTOTYPE DEFINITION
  • A Prototype is The Outcome of a Protocept,
    Generally Optimized Through Pilot Plant Trials
  • Generally Utilizes Appropriate Statistical
    Designs for Optimization at the Pilot Plant Scale
  • Prototypes are technically feasible

28
PROTOCEPT DEVELOPMENT
  • Interpretation of the Concept
  • Product Attributes
  • Formulation Ingredient Selection
  • Processing Steps and Conditions Established
  • Specifications
  • Product Assessment
  • Packaging
  • HACCP
  • Shelf Life Evaluation
  • Pricing
  • Consideration Of Regulation Compliance

29
LECTURE 7 SCALE-UP
  • Definition
  • Act of using results obtained from laboratory
    studies for designing a prototype and a pilot
    plant process construction a pilot plant and
    using pilot plant data for designing and
    constructing a full scale plant or modifying an
    existing plant

30
Steps in Scale-Up
  • Define product economics based on projected
    market size and competitive selling and provide
    guidance for allowable manufacturing costs
  • Conduct laboratory studies and scale-up planning
    at the same time
  • Define key rate-controlling steps in the proposed
    process

31
Steps in Scale-Up
  • Conduct preliminary larger-than-laboratory
    studies with equipment to be used in
    rate-controlling step to aid in plant design
  • Design and construct a pilot plant including
    provisions for process and environmental
    controls, cleaning and sanitizing systems,
    packaging and waste handling systems, and meeting
    regulatory agency requirements
  • Evaluate pilot plant results (product and
    process)

32
LECTURE 8 SPECIFICATIONS
  • DEFINITION (WEBSTERS NEW COLLEGIATE DICTIONARY)
  • SPECIFY 1 to name or state explicitly or in
    detail
  • 2 to include as an item in a specification

33
Components in specifications
  • Composition
  • Safety
  • performance

34
LECTURE 9 HOW TO RUN A PLANT TRIAL MODULE
  • To learn about the need for plant trials
  • To learn the basic steps in running a plant trial
  • To hear some advice on mistakes to avoid

35
PLANT TRIAL DEFINITION
  • A Plant Trial is a test production run on
    commercial scale equipment intended to validate
    the process defined to make a product and the
    scale-up calculations used.

36
WHEN DO YOU RUN A PLANT TRIAL?
  • After a process has been defined in the pilot
    plant
  • Before a product launch
  • When you need product for a consumer test

37
BASIC STEPS IN CONDUCTING A PLANT TRIAL
  • 1. Define objectives
  • 2. Plan trials
  • 3. Schedule plant time
  • 4. Brief plant management
  • 5. Brief and train operators
  • 6. Conduct trial
  • 7. Evaluate product
  • 8. Debrief plant management

38
Process Flow Sheet and Process Optimization Module
  • Know what a process flow chart is
  • Understand the need to optimize process
    conditions
  • A Flow Chart is a schematic depiction of the
    process required to make a given product. It
    contains all the information needed for process
    scale-up, design and cost determination.

39
LECTURE 10 Packaging Considerations Module
  • To learn Product Developments role in developing
    new packages
  • To learn what factors to consider for new
    packaging

40
Product Development Priorities
  • Product Protection
  • Through Distribution
  • Through Shelf Life
  • Through Consumption
  • Thick Package Walls
  • Functionality
  • Clear Use Instructions
  • Easy to Open
  • Easy to Handle
  • Resealable
  • Storable
  • Package Safety
  • Non-breakable
  • Sanitary

41
Marketing Priorities
  • Big Front Panel
  • Large Print Size
  • Billboard Possibilities
  • Consumer Friendly Language
  • Branding
  • Package Clarity
  • Differentiating
  • Attractive

42
Purchasing Priorities
  • Low Cost
  • Multiple Suppliers
  • Long Relationships
  • Thin Wall Packages (Light weighted)

43
Legal Priorities
  • Legal
  • Name
  • Company Address
  • Net Weight
  • Ingredient Label
  • Nutritional Label
  • Claims
  • Contingent Language (may contain peanuts)
  • Big Principal Display Panel
  • Large Print
  • Common Name
  • No Small Parts

44
Enemies of Packaged Food Quality
  • Light
  • Oxygen
  • Water
  • Insects and Rodents
  • Microorganisms
  • Bacteria
  • Yeasts and Mold
  • Time
  • Temperature
  • People and Transportation

45
KEY TO NOTE
  • Start Package development early because it can be
    a very complex process requiring compromises and
    trade offs.

46
LECTURE 11 PRODUCT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES
  • To understand the factors that control the
    performance of a food product
  • To know when, where, how and what to evaluate to
    determine performance

47
Rollout
  • When are you ready?
  • Advertising and promotional strategies in
    place, taking into account competition and
    consumer response in test markets- roll of
    advertising agencies or in-house groups.
  • Pricing strategy for product vs. competition?
  • Manufacturing process yield products meeting
  • consumer acceptance, quality, safety, shelf
  • life, cost, and regulatory requirements.

48
Measures of Rollout Success
  • Return on investment analysis
  • Consumer reaction did they like it?,
  • repeat purchases?
  • Sales volume , market penetration, market
  • share? Did they meet goals?
  • Pay-back, did profits meet objectives?

49
  • Each group shall submit a developed product with
    a well written report at the end of the course
    work as COURSE PROJECT.
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