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Approaching St. Basil

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Approaching St' Basils and Red Square' – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Approaching St. Basil


1
Approaching St. Basils and Red Square.
2
Part of the Kremlin wall in Moscow.
3
A very big cannon at the Kremlin, with Steve
Buckles posing in front. Steve was then
president of the National Council on Economic
Education.
4
Lenins tomb on Red Square, in front of the
Kremlin wall.
5
The exterior of the Gum department store. Most
of Red Square was blocked off by security guards
on this day. On other days, more of the Square
is open to pedestrians, parades, or even fairs
and stalls.
6
The interior of the GUM department store, which
in February of 1993 was still mostly empty on the
top floors, and filled with smaller stalls and
stores on the lower floors. Ironically, this
building is directly across Red Square from
Lenins tomb.
7
St. Basils cathedral, which also sits on one end
of Red Square.
8
Another shot of St. Basils.
9
A close-up of St. Basils, in Moscow. To my
surprise, the building is made mostly of brick.
10
One of the seven Stalin-period wedding cake
buildings. This was our dorm at Moscow State
University. We tried to see the view from the
top of the building, but were turned away by
security guards. The building is in the Lenin
Hill area, above the main city, which supposedly
makes it a natural site for electronic
surveillance equipment.
11
The parquet floor in the dormitory at Moscow
State note the cobwebs and my roach trap, which
worked.
12
The floor of the shower at the dorm at Moscow
State.
13
The sink in the bathroom at the dorm at Moscow
State, which was pulled away from the wall about
six inches.
14
The floor of the bathroom.
15
On the grounds of the palace of a 19th century
general in Moscow.
16
Interior of the generals palace.
17
A bus that took us from Moscow State University
to a conference center about 100 kilometers
outside of town, near a large, frozen lake
surrounded with beautiful birches and evergreens.
Unfortunately, the bus had diesel sloshing on
the floorboards, and even a newer bus had similar
fumes coming through the vents.
18
The frozen lake, or sea, at sunset. Spread
across the lake were dozens of people icefishing
well past midnight. The clouds cleared that
night and the stars were beautiful as we walked
in the woods and across the lake.
19
The birch and evergreen woods around the lake.
Mike Watts and Bob Highsmith, then Vice President
of the National Council on Economic Education.
20
The engine of the Transiberian express.
21
A first-class compartment for two people on the
Transiberian express. Very nice quarters, clean,
air conditioned, and made up daily by a hostess
who rode on each car. A dining car with some
good food, not counting the creamed liver over
rice that was served one day for breakfast and
lunch. Still, a big contrast with some other
trains, like the one from Kiev to Simpheropol.
22
Sergei Ravitchev on the Transiberian express.
Sergei forgot to bring pickles -- a complementary
good for vodka -- but he purchased this bottle
from a lady at one of the many stops. Two days
and nights later, they were gone, and so was the
vodka.
23
A small village in Russia, seen from the
Transiberian express.
24
Old churches near Novosibirsk transported from
a much more remote area of Siberia, they were the
only buildings not burned to the ground when
peasants abandoned a village during the plague.
25
A restaurant in Siberia. It is common practice
to set out the first course before people are
seated, and if the restaurant is in a wooded
area, as this one was, and if the doors or
windows are open and the cats slow, little birds
swoop down to pretaste the food.
26
The battleship Aurora in St. Petersburg. This
ship fired the shots on the Winter Palace (now
the Hermitage) to signal the start of the 1917
revolution.
27
The Hermitage.
28
The Hermitage, closer. Note the statues across
the top of the building. The interior makes
Versailles seem plain.
29
The Neva river in St. Petersburg. Peter the
Great decreed that the capital would be built in
this boggy area to give Russia a winter port to
the West.
30
Private agricultural plots with small storage
buildings on the outskirts of St. Petersburg.
Productivity on these plots greatly exceeded that
on the large agricultural collectives during the
Soviet period, and the plots have remained
extremely important to many families through the
worst parts of the transition periods.
31
A church in Vilnius, Lithuania.
32
This is a small chapel dedicated to Mary in
Vilnius, Lithuania, over one of the old gates to
the walled city. Inside, the main wall of the
chapel is covered with silver sheets engraved and
hammered with representations of the sacred heart
of Jesus. The chapel windows face east, and at
dawn the sun is reflected off of the silver.
33
A restored manor house and castle outside
Vilnius, Lithuania.
34
Our host in Vilnius, Arvitus, was in the first
teacher training program series we offered. He
is standing here at the monument to 13 people who
were killed by Russian soldiers in 1991 at the
television/broadcast tower. Arvitus was one of
the demonstrators that night, despite the fact
that he had two young daughters.
35
More of the monuments at the television tower in
Vilnius.
36
The television tower and the top of a monument in
Vilnius.
37
Another demonstration in Vilnius took place at
the Parliamentary building. Crowds gathered here
to prevent the Russian soldiers from seizing the
building. This is a monument at the building to
those who died.
38
Outside the government hall in Vilnius, with
recently erected signs and symbols proclaiming
Lithuanias independence.
39
Rigas old town from across the river.
40
A Soviet-period suspension bridge in Riga, Latvia.
41
The suspension bridge in Riga, with Marie Wilson,
Mark Schug, and Andres Arrak.
42
A pre-Soviet building in Riga.
43
A restored and renovated hotel in Riga.
44
The main statue in Rigas central park.
45
An old church in Riga.
46
An old commercial building in Riga note the
Atlas motif of the statue on the top of the
building.
47
The river and opera house in Rigas central park.
48
December Sunrise in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan -
buildings of flats or apartments.
49
Closer view of flats in Bishkek.
50
A gas station in Kyrgyzstan this was typical in
the older system, but newer stations are now
being built.
51
Mike Watts in Marie Wilsons salmon colored silk
underwear in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, in December.
It was very cold, and we were all getting sick.
The purple curtains were standard in our hotel
rooms.
52
Unless you got the pinkish orange curtains. The
door leads to a little balcony.
53
A teacher in Bishkek playing the Geologists
Dilemma.
54
Marie Wilson runs the paper clip activity to
demonstrate property rights in Bishkek.
55
The Creative Toy Production activity in Bishkek
weighing the marginal benefits and marginal costs
of what goes into a very creative product.
56
A prize goes to the winners, but shortly after
this we learned what Purdue means in Russian.
57
Teaching with a translator and student
presentations.
58
The T-shirt allocation game.
59
Our first hotel in Bishkek, but we moved after
the power went completely out.
60
Driving from Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, to Ala Matta,
Kazakstan, to catch the plane home.
61
The mountains in Kyrgyzstan, seen from the edge
of Bishkek. When asked what is the best thing
about their country, the Kyrgyz almost always say
the mountains. Their tapestries and other art
often represent the mountains.
62
A roadside vendor of shashlik, or shiskabob, near
the border between Kyrgyzstan and Kazakstan.
63
The shashlik is very fresh, but the facilities
probably would not meet FDA standards.
64
The state-built Manas theme park behind the hotel
on the outskirts of Bishkek. The park and
festival celebrating (for the second time in 20
years) the 1,000th birthday of Manas and the epic
poem that was only written down in the 1920s.
The park and festival were designed to attract
Western investment, but the whole project was ill
conceived and poorly executed, and actually drew
resources away from ongoing projects such as a
Turkish-built hotel.
65
More of the Manas theme park in Bishkek.
66
More of the Manas theme park in Bishkek.
67
More of the Manas theme park in Bishkek.
68
The theme park hotel in Bishkek, this time in
summer.
69
The Manas theme park, again.
70
Still more of the Manas theme park.
71
A Kyrgyz yurta, or tent. You still see these all
across the countryside.
72
Barbara DeVita, Mike Watts, the Soros staff, and
our translator, drinking kumous in front of a
yurta on the way from Bishkek to Lake Issy-Kul.
73
This is kumous fermented mares milk. It
tastes like milk with a lot of vinegar in it.
74
It pays to advertise, even kumous. The dried
fish might have helped.
75
A whole roadside of private enterprise in
Kyrgyzstan.
76
A mountain stream in Kyrgyzstan, near Lake
Issy-Kul.
77
The valley seen from the base of the mountain.
78
A Kyrgyz cowboy.
79
Is it Kyrgyzstan or Wyoming?
80
Our accommodations at Lake Issy-Kul. No hot
water fixtures. Freezing cold water that always
ran in two of our three rooms.
81
Private enterprise at Lake Issy-Kul.
82
Mike Watts and Barbara DeVita, from the National
Council, did not ride the camel at Lake Issy-Kul.
83
We all did take a field trip on the Soviet-style
excursion boat.
84
The scenery at Lake Issy-Kul was spectacular.
Cold, clear, blue water in the lake, clear blue
skies, and the mountains all around. To make
telephone calls by satellite, we drove around to
find places with no interference.
85
This is a very cold stream coming off the
mountains in Kyrgyzstan. Our translator told us
that a few people have begun to go white water
rafting in the area.
86
Yurta at a roadside stop, blending old forms with
new enterprises.
87
Lake Issy-Kul and the mountains.
88
Jim Grunloh crossing a cold stream to our picnic
on the mountains.
89
Tradition seems to call for the men attending a
picnic to go off and drink vodka together.
90
Shashlik in the making.
91
Shashlik cooking. Its delicious.
92
The Kiev airport, as we walk to the Delta jet.
Only recently have ramps from the airports been
used, even for international flights.
93
Another view of Kiev and its chestnut trees.
94
Kiev from the bell tower in the old monastery.
95
A sports complex and downtown Kiev from the Rus
hotel.
96
A building in downtown Kiev.
97
We were in Kiev on Heroes Day, May 1. They
remember their heroes and World War II far more
vividly than we seem to in the U.S. But the
Soviet convention is to date the war from
1941-45, ignoring the events of 1939 and 1940.
98
Cats at a bank in Kiev, though they are also
functional parts of many cafeterias and
restaurants.
99
A supermarket of stalls in Kiev the man in the
hat is selling dried fish. Jerry Lynch and Mike
Watts are standing in front of the counter.
100
A produce stall at the Kiev market, selling
celery, potatoes, and cucumbers.
101
Mike Watts and the director of the Soros
foundation office in Lviv, wearing a traditional
Ukrainian shirt.
102
Teacher workshop in Lviv, Ukraine.
103
A group of teacher trainers in Lviv, with Jim
Grunloh teaching and Patty Elder, Vice President
of the National Council on Economic Education,
looking on.
104
A Russian/Ukrainian television station five or
six buttons for preset stations are standard, but
the drawer below the buttons pops out with dials
that you can move to pick the preset station.
Even cities of a million or two people seldom had
more than five stations in the mid-1990s.
105
The state wedding place in Kharkiv. Multiple
weddings take place simultaneously, moving from
room to room to complete different parts of the
legal and traditional ceremonies.
106
A production simulation in Kharkiv, Ukraine.
107
A railroad stop in Crimea, on the way from Kiev
to Simpheropol. The lady in the red shirt is
selling fruit. There was no dining car on the
train, even though the trip took 26 hours.
108
A castle from the old Silk Route in Sudak,
Crimea, on the Black Sea.
109
The beach and harbor at Sudak from the castle on
the mountain.
110
New construction in Sudak, but this is typical in
Russia and Ukraine.
111
The black smoke from a generator that ran once a
day, to provide hot water for 20 - 30 minutes
our morning shower time was around 830 AM.
112
The Christmas festival in Warsaw.
113
More of the Warsaw Christmas festival many of
the stalls sold food and Christmas lights and
decorations.
114
The stalls at the Warsaw Christmas festival at
night, with a visit from Santa.
115
Scenes from Minsk, Belarus, School 207.
116
Scenes from Minsk, Belarus, School 207.
117
Scenes from Minsk, Belarus, School 207.
118
Scenes from Minsk, Belarus, School 207.
119
Scenes from Minsk, Belarus, School 207.
120
To view these slides at a later date, check out
Mike Watts home page http//www.mgmt.purdue.edu/f
aculty/watts/
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