Filling an Empty Emotional Tank- Recognizing and Supporting Anxiety Driven Behaviors - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Filling an Empty Emotional Tank- Recognizing and Supporting Anxiety Driven Behaviors

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Filling an Empty Emotional Tank-Recognizing and Supporting Anxiety Driven Behaviors Fall 2013 Catherine Bartelman Liz Blair Linda Warning – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Filling an Empty Emotional Tank- Recognizing and Supporting Anxiety Driven Behaviors


1
Filling an Empty Emotional Tank-Recognizing and
Supporting Anxiety Driven Behaviors
  • Fall 2013
  • Catherine Bartelman
  • Liz Blair
  • Linda Warning

2
Word of the Day-HOPE
  • Its going to end-Its the belief that staff can
    change their own behavior and child can change
    own behavior.
  • Adjust the timeframes.
  • Hope says this stinks right now, but tomorrows
    another day.

3
Not Taking Things Personally
  • These kids lack the skills needed to be able to
    be in a better place than they are right now.
  • We dont have the magic right now, it might
    take until next week or the week after, it might
    be another month before we are in a better place.
  • We have to leave the egos in the parking lot and
    come to the realization that these kids are doing
    the best their skills allow them to do. Whether
    they behave or not is not a reflection of your
    competence.

4
Not Taking Things Personally (Continued)
  • Youre a coach in helping to remediate the
    behavior, not establishing a hierarchy of whos
    the boss.
  • Dont worry about what everybody else thinks.
    We get respect for controlling ourselves..maintai
    n calm and serenity in the chaos of whats
    happening.
  • High expectations lead to better outcomes

5
Define Anxiety
  • Definition Anxiety is defined as an abnormal and
    overwhelming sense of apprehension and fear
    marked by physiological signs, by exaggerated
    assessment concerning the reality and nature of
    the threat, and by self-doubt about ones
    capacity to cope with it.
  • 1 Minahan, Jessica Rappaport, Nancy
    (2012-04-01). The Behavior Code A Practical
    Guide to Understanding and Teaching the Most
    Challenging Students (Kindle Locations 791-793).
    Harvard Education Press. Kindle Edition.

6
Symptoms of Anxiety
  • Symptoms Anxiety symptoms may be
    disproportionate to actual events interfere with
    a childs daily ability to function (which may be
    seen as difficulty with peers, low self-esteem,
    academic failure, or stress in family
    relationships) and be present for a substantial
    period.
  • 2 Minahan, Jessica Rappaport, Nancy
    (2012-04-01). The Behavior Code A Practical
    Guide to Understanding and Teaching the Most
    Challenging Students (Kindle Locations 793-795).
    Harvard Education Press. Kindle Edition.

7
Anxiety The Invisible Disability
Like a can of soda-kids with anxiety look the
same on the outside whether it (or they) has/have
been shaken or not. You wont know the level of
anxiety until the child erupts. The only way to
know if its been shaken is to open it!!
8
How Full is the Glass
9
Brain Rush
When your brain floods with more info than can be
processed. When sensory and movement floods
cognition and cognition cant function. People
with high anxiety dont have to ride the roller
coaster for this to happen
10
Neurotypical Cognitive Capacity for Processing
11
Disordered Cognitive Capacity for Processing
12
How Does Anxiety Manifest
  • Cognitive Symptoms
  • Our thoughts (automatic, catastrophic, active
    minds)
  • Physical Symptoms
  • Subjective feeling of discomfort, physiological
    arousal such as sweating, nausea and dizziness,
    flushed cheeks, tense muscles
  • Behavioral Symptoms (some classic, some less
    obvious)
  • Overt behaviors of avoidance or escape, yell,
    kick, punch, cry, bargain, bolt (Need to find out
    why behavior happens just like in a heart attack
    victim, there is a need to find out what the
    underlying cause is). Loud, powerful and defiant.
    Inflexible, impulsive, shutting down.

13
Clues Discover if Behavior is the Result of
Anxiety
4 of the 8 Clues 1. Outside diagnosis 2.
Inflexibility, irrational, impulsive, emotionally
intense or over reactive 3. Sudden and/or subtle
changes in behavior 4. Inconsistent behavior
14
Clues Discover if Behavior is the Result of
Anxiety
4 More Clues 5. Pattern of difficulty during
certain times 6. Escape or avoidance behaviors
7. Desire for control and predictability 8.
Student has perfectionistic tendencies
15
Strategies to Deal with Anxiety
Slow Down Speak Less Step Back Simplify See
Opportunities Switch it up Stop and
Wait Remember We lose our basic skills
when we are under stress
http//www.youtube.com/watch?viyzfIaTGLf0  
16
Supporting Transitions
  • 4 Ss (Components to a Transition)
  • Stop the first activity
  • Shift (cognitive) to the next activity STOP
    activity-
  • Start the next activity,
  • Structure and expectations during transition
  • What Makes Transitions Tough
  • Less defined duration, fewer physical parameters
    and less clear expectations.

17
Supporting Transitions
  • What Makes Transitions Easier
  • Find natural breaks
  • Help the cognitive shift
  • Task strips, visual schedules, engage in
    structured tasks during wait time in transitions.
  • Define where were going, what we're doing and
    how long it should take.
  • Use sponges as distractors (push in chairs,
    papers in mailboxes, organize books, etc.)

18
Communication Styles
Shared communication vs. directive
communication Paradigm Shift-Make less demands
and more comments
19
Crisis Management
  • 1. Listen, agree, apologize, when needed
  • 2. Collaborate-help them to find a
  • more appropriate way to get
  • what they want
  • 3. Distraction
  • Novel
  • Area of interest
  • Sensory

20
Haim ginnot-1971 Quote
  • As a teacher I have come to the frightening
    conclusion that I am the decisive element in the
    classroom.
  • It is my personal approach that creates the
    climate. It is my daily mood that makes the
    weather.
  • As a teacher, I possess tremendous power to make
    a childs life miserable or joyous. I can be a
    tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration.
    I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all
    situations, it is my response that decides
    whether a crisis will be escalated or
    de-escalated, a child humanized or dehumanized.

21
References
  • Jed Baker-Fall 2013 AEP Conference
  • Nicole Beurkens-2013 AEP Conference
  • The Behavior Code A Practical Guide to
    Understanding and Teaching the Most Challenging
    Students, Kindle Edition.
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