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Using%20Technology%20with%20Classroom%20Instruction%20that%20Works

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Title: Using%20Technology%20with%20Classroom%20Instruction%20that%20Works


1
Using Technology with Classroom Instruction that
Works
  • Steve Van Bockern
  • Perry C. Hanavan
  • Sharon Gray
  • Julie Ashworth

2
Au.D./Ed.D
3
Goals
  • Use the nine research-based instructional
    strategies for enhancing student achievement,
  • Discuss ways in which to use technology with
    these strategies, and
  • Begin planning technology-infused lessons or
    units that use effective instructional practices.

4
Description
  • Are you looking for research-based instructional
    strategies to improve student learning?
  • Would you like to learn how to use technology
    with these instructional strategies?
  • Designed for educators who want to infuse their
    curriculum with technology to a greater extent
    based on research of nine effective instructional
    practices and learn how technology can be
    embedded in those practices.
  • Participants will weave these practices into
    instruction using their own lesson plans.

5
The shot seen round the world
  • Tim Berners-Lee had little interest from
    employer. His WWW proposal came back with the
    words "vague but exciting" written across the
    cover.
  • So Berners-Lee took his invention to the people.
    He posted a message to an online newsgroup--
  • announcing the existence of the "World Wide Web
    (WWW) project."
  • At 25620 p.m., Aug. 6, 1991

6
What is the Internet?
  • "The Internet isn't about wires and tubes. In
    effect, it's about change. A whole host of
    things in our world are just waiting to be
    changed, longing for better solutions, and the
    Internet is the stimulus, and perhaps the means,
    to unleashing these pent-up desires, trends, and
    forces to their next natural state.
  • Weintaub, JN. (1997) Capital thoughts. Internet
    World, March

7
Thomas L. Friedman
  • At its best, the Internet can educate more people
    faster than any media tool we've ever had.
  • At its worst, it can make people dumber faster
    than any media tool we've ever had.

Friedman, Thomas. http//www.fsgbooks.com/fsg/long
itudesandattitudesexcrpt.htm
8
Pew Research Center
  • "The Internet has become a mainstream information
    tool,"
  • 67 of Americans expect that they can find
    reliable information about health or medical
    conditions online 81 of Internet users say this
    versus 45 of non-Internet users.
  • 63 of all Americans expect that a business will
    have a Web site that gives them information about
    a product they are considering buying. Four out
    of five (79) of Internet users say this and 38
    of non-users say this.
  • "For many of these Internet users, the Net is the
    first place to which they will turn next time
    they need information about a government service
    or health care.
  • http//quickstart.clari.net/qs_se/webnews/wed/bu/Q
    us-internet.RDcs_CDU.html

9
Millennial
10
Not Without Problems
11
Census 2000
12
Census 2000
13
Census 2000
14
Internet Access
15
Commercial Growth
16
Web Access Trends
98 of schools are wired for Internet access
17
Users by Gender
http//admin.chcf.org/documents/ehealth/HealthEPeo
ple.pdf
18
Moms Online More Than Teens
  • Net-surfing moms spend an average 16 hours, 52
    minutes a week on the Internet,
  • Teens average 12 hours, 17 minutes online each
    week,
  • DMS gathered data from more than 8,000 mothers
    who use the Net through AOL and other Internet
    service providers (ISPs).

Dick Kelsey, Newsbytes, DULLES, VIRGINIA, U.S.A.,
07 May 2002, 1047 AM CST, Washington Pos AOL
subsidiary Digital Marketing Services (DMS) Survey
19
Old vs. New Technology
Its not how hard you work
Its how much work you get done
20
Classroom Instruction That Works by Marzano,
Pickering and Pollock
  • Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student
    Achievement

21
Nine Instructional Strategies
  1. Identifying similarities and differences
  2. Summarizing and note taking
  3. Reinforcing effort and providing recognition
  4. Homework and practice
  5. Nonlinguistic representations
  6. Cooperative learning
  7. Setting objectives and providing feedback
  8. Generating and testing hypothesis
  9. Questions, cues, and advance organizers

22
Identifying Similarities and Differences
  • Compare
  • Classify
  • Create metaphors
  • Create analogies

23
Summarizing and Note Taking
  • Rule-Based strategy
  • Reciprocal teaching
  • Teacher-Prepared
  • Informal outlining
  • Webbing
  • Combination

24
Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition
  • Teach about effort
  • Keep track of effort and achievement
  • Personalize recognition
  • Pause, prompt, and praise
  • Concrete symbols of recognition

25
Homework
  • Establish and communicate a homework policy
  • Design homework assignments that clearly
    articulate the purpose and outcome
  • Vary the approaches to providing feedback
  • Chart accuracy and speed
  • Design practice that focuses on specific
    elements of a complex skill or process
  • Plan time for students to increase their
    conceptual understanding of skills or processes

26
Nonlinguistic Representations
  • Create graphic organizers
  • Make physical models
  • Generate mental pictures
  • Draw pictures and pictographs
  • Engage in kinesthetic activity

27
Cooperative Learning
  • Use a variety of criteria for grouping students
  • Combine cooperative learning with other classroom
    structures

28
Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback
  • Set specific but flexible goals
  • Develop contracts
  • Provide Rubrics
  • Focus feedback for specific types of knowledge
    and skill
  • Utilize student-led feedback

29
Generating and Testing Hypotheses
  • Structure tasks to guide students through
    generating and testing hypotheses
  • Ensure that students can explain their hypotheses
    and their conclusions

30
Cues, Questions, Advance Organizers
  • Provide explicit cues
  • Develop questions that elicit inferences
  • Generate analytic questions
  • Provide expository advance organizers
  • Present narrative advance organizers
  • Utilize skimming as a form of advance organizers
  • Develop graphic advance organizers

31
Similarities and Differences
  • Presenting students with explicit guidance in
    identifying similarities and differences enhances
    students understanding of and ability to use
    knowledge.
  • Identify for students the items they are to
    compare and the characteristics on which they are
    to base the comparison.
  • This process will focus conclusions
  • Goal of process is for students obtain a general
    awareness of the same similarities and
    differences for the same characteristics
  • Ex. First Ladies compared on the characteristics
    of their backgrounds, major responsibilities,
    things they were known forgoal is an overview of
    the changing role of women in American society.
  • Obtain convergent results

32
Similarities and Differences
  • Asking students to independently identify
    similarities and differences enhances students
    understanding of and ability to use knowledge.
  • Students select the characteristics on which
    items are to be compared, or select both the
    items to compare and the characteristics on which
    they are compared.
  • Obtain divergent results
  • Ex. Compare two fairy tales on literary elements
    previously presented
  • Ex. Compare four pieces of music and compare them
    according to any of the elements of music that
    they had learned

33
Similarities and Differences
  • Representing similarities and differences in
    graphic or symbolic form enhances students
    understanding of and ability to use knowledge.
  • Venn diagrams
  • Comparison matrix

34
Similarities and Differences
  • Ways of representing similarities and
    differences
  • Comparing-the process of identifying similarities
    and differences between or among things or ideas
  • Classifying-the process of grouping things that
    are alike into categories on the basis of their
    characteristics
  • Identify rules that govern class or category
    membership
  • Student or teacher directed
  • Graphic organizers boxed table, bubble chart
  • Ex. Classify and organize the traits of main
    characters in books weve read this year

35
Similarities and Differences
  • Creating Metaphors-the process of identifying a
    general or basic pattern in a specific topic and
    then finding another topic that appears to be
    quite different but that has the same general
    pattern
  • Two items in a metaphor are connected by an
    abstract or non-literal relationship. Ex. Love is
    a rose.
  • Goal is to address the abstract relationships
    between elements
  • Teacher directed provide the first element of
    the metaphor and brainstorm characteristics
    finding its abstract elements, students use this
    pattern to identify something else that has these
    same abstract characteristics.
  • Student directed students provided with one
    element of a metaphor and asked to identify the
    second element and describe the abstract
    relationship
  • Graphic organizer show elements, literal
    patterns, shared abstract pattern
  • Ex. How is writing a paragraph like building a
    sandwich?

36
Similarities and Differences
  • Creating Analogies-the process of identifying
    relationships between pairs of concepts-in other
    words, identifying relationships between
    relationships
  • A is to B as C is to D format
  • Opposites, similarities, scale, part/whole,
    item/use, cause/effect, etc.
  • Teacher directed present an analogy, ask
    students to explain how the relationships are
    similar, fill in a missing element of an analogy
  • Student directed teacher presents first pair
    then students provide the second pair that has
    the same relationship as the first pair.
  • Graphic organizer two words in boxes on top,
    middle line with relationship, two words in boxes
    on the bottom.

37
Identifying Similarities Differences



38
Similarities and Differences
  • Brian Maxwell, world class marathon runner and
    inventor of the PowerBar, promoted as
    scientifically formulated to provide energy to
    athletes and support optimal health. In 1971, he
    accepted a track scholarship to UC Berkeley. By
    the time he graduated in 1975 with a degree in
    architecture, he had been honored with the Brutus
    Hamilton Award for his achievements on the
    school's track team. In 1977, Maxwell was ranked
    as the No. 3 marathon runner in the world.
    Maxwell died young, at the age of 51, after
    suffering an apparent heart attack.
  • Hanna Barysevich of Minsk, Belarus, a woman
    believed to be the oldest in the world celebrated
    her 116th birthday this week in the former Soviet
    republic of Belarus. "I'm tired of living
    already, but God still hasn't collected me," she
    said with a smile. Barysevich was born on May 5,
    1888, in the village of Buda, 37 miles east of
    Minsk. Her parents were poor, landless peasants.
    "From my early childhood I didn't know anything
    but physical labor," said Barysevich, who never
    learned to read or write. She worked in a
    kolkhoz, or collective farm, until age 95, then
    moved to the house she shares with her
    78-year-old daughter Nina. "I'll drink to my own
    health with pleasure," said Hanna, a former farm
    worker who lives in a house outside Minsk. Hanna
    prefers simple village food homemade sausages,
    pork fat, milk and bread.

39
Identifying Similarities Differences
  • Brian Maxwell, world class marathon runner and
    inventor of the PowerBar, promoted as
    scientifically formulated to provide energy to
    athletes and support optimal health. In 1971, he
    accepted a track scholarship to UC Berkeley. By
    the time he graduated in 1975 with a degree in
    architecture, he had been honored with the Brutus
    Hamilton Award for his achievements on the
    school's track team. In 1977, Maxwell was ranked
    as the No. 3 marathon runner in the world.
    Maxwell died young, at the age of 51, after
    suffering an apparent heart attack.
  • Hanna Barysevich of Minsk, Belarus, a woman
    believed to be the oldest in the world celebrated
    her 116th birthday this week in the former Soviet
    republic of Belarus. "I'm tired of living
    already, but God still hasn't collected me," she
    said with a smile. Barysevich was born on May 5,
    1888, in the village of Buda, 37 miles east of
    Minsk. Her parents were poor, landless peasants.
    "From my early childhood I didn't know anything
    but physical labor," said Barysevich, who never
    learned to read or write. She worked in a
    kolkhoz, or collective farm, until age 95, then
    moved to the house she shares with her
    78-year-old daughter Nina. "I'll drink to my own
    health with pleasure," said Hanna, a former farm
    worker who lives in a house outside Minsk. Hanna
    prefers simple village food homemade sausages,
    pork fat, milk and bread.

PowerBar is to __________
Pork fat is to __________
40
Identifying Similarities Differences

  • Brian Maxwell, world class marathon runner and
    inventor of the PowerBar, promoted as
    scientifically formulated to provide energy to
    athletes and support optimal health. In 1971, he
    accepted a track scholarship to UC Berkeley. By
    the time he graduated in 1975 with a degree in
    architecture, he had been honored with the Brutus
    Hamilton Award for his achievements on the
    school's track team. In 1977, Maxwell was ranked
    as the No. 3 marathon runner in the world.
    Maxwell died young, at the age of 51, after
    suffering an apparent heart attack.
  • Hanna Barysevich of Minsk, Belarus, a woman
    believed to be the oldest in the world celebrated
    her 116th birthday this week in the former Soviet
    republic of Belarus. "I'm tired of living
    already, but God still hasn't collected me," she
    said with a smile. Barysevich was born on May 5,
    1888, in the village of Buda, 37 miles east of
    Minsk. Her parents were poor, landless peasants.
    "From my early childhood I didn't know anything
    but physical labor," said Barysevich, who never
    learned to read or write. She worked in a
    kolkhoz, or collective farm, until age 95, then
    moved to the house she shares with her
    78-year-old daughter Nina. "I'll drink to my own
    health with pleasure," said Hanna, a former farm
    worker who lives in a house outside Minsk. Hanna
    prefers simple village food homemade sausages,
    pork fat, milk and bread.

41
Online PPT
  • Nine Instructional Strategies
  • Classroom Applications Using Excel
  • Transforming Teaching Through Tech
  • Classroom Instruction

42
In Conclusion
Our task is to provide an education for the kind
of kids we have. Not the kind of kids we used to
have, or want to have, or the kind that exists in
our dreams.
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