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Principles of Design

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RADIAL SYMMETRY Radial Balance is created when elements are repeated around a central point. This occurs frequently in nature: I.e. in flowers, snowflakes etc. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Principles of Design


1
Principles of Design
2
Unity
  • The use of elements in a work of art to create a
    consistent effect
  • All parts of a work of art working together to
    create a consistent effect no one part stands
    out, the work appears as a whole

3
Ways to Create Unity
Proximity unlike elements appear to belong
together when placed closer together in a grouping
Similarity make items the same in some way to
visually link them
Continuation place the elements in a way to lead
the eye
4
SIMILARITY -Repeated similar shapes colours,
same colour background (white)
5
SIMILARITY -Similar shapes colours (analogous
colour scheme, boxy shapes)
6
SIMILARITY -Similar colours (mostly warm, flat
geometric shapes, overall checkerboard pattern.
7
SIMILARITY -Repetition of shapes colours, all
are flat PROXIMITY - shapes are placed in
groupings
8
PROXIMITY- Many varied shapes, textures objects
are grouped closely together. Some repetition of
colour
9
SIMILARITY-Repetition of colours shapes.
CONTINUATION-Circles create diagonal line going
from bottom right to top left
10
CONTINUATION -musicians repeated to follow a
curve around the picture
11
An artist may avoid apparent unity in an artwork
in order to best capture a sense of upheaval or
chaos and to avoid boredom in the composition.
William Roberts, The First German Gas Attack at
Ypres, 1918, oil on canvas, 304.8 x 365.8 cm,
National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa.
12
Variety
-adding interest through differences detail
13
Ways of creating variety
Contrasts
14
CONTRASTING VALUES
15
CONTRASTING VALUES
16
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17
Too much variety can be confusing!
Too little variety can be boring!
18
Dominance
Making one area or image stand out from
everything else
19
The dominant area is often referred to as a focal
point or center of interest
This means we tend to focus on that area first
and most often.
20
Ways to create a focal point or dominant area.
We see her face first because
She is staring directly at us
It is lighter compared to its surroundings (value
contrast)
It is a different brighter colour compared to
its surroundings (green face next to orange hair)
It is largest compared to other faces (size)
21
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22
Ways to create dominance (summary)
  • make that part larger compared to other parts
  • give that part some psychological interest (we
    like to look at people)
  • make that part lighter or darker compared to
    other parts
  • make that part a very different or brighter
    colour compared to other parts
  • make that part very different in shape compared
    to other parts
  • place that part in a more centered position in
    the composition
  • make other parts of the image direct attention or
    point to that part

23
Rhythm
Movement
Repetition
24
There are two types of movement in artwork
25
Compositional Movement - the use of repeated
elements /or imagery causes the eye to move
along a path, and often, to repeat that path
26
  • Often, both kinds of movement are combined in an
    artwork
  • Figures appear to dance and move in the painting
    to the left.
  • Repeated colours, figures and swirling lines draw
    the eye around the composition

27
Three methods for creating rhythm are
Repeat the same element
Repeat two or more elements on an alternating
basis
Repeat the same element, but make it change
gradually/progressively in some way
28
Balance
The equal distribution of visual weight on either
side of a compositions center (both sides have
equal eye-interest).
29
  • The visual weight of images objects in a
    painting depends on their
  • relative size
  • brightness of colour
  • contrasts of value or texture
  • complexity of shapes
  • distance from the center of the composition.

30
Types of Balance
31
SYMMETRICAL BALANCE
Identical elements are placed on either side of a
central axis. Symmetry creates a stable, calm
often formal, serious effect.
32
APPROXIMATE SYMMETRICAL BALANCE
Approximate symmetry creates a feeling similar to
symmetry but with a bit more variety and,
therefore, interest
33
ASYMMETRICAL BALANCE
Asymmetrical Balance is created when both sides
of an image are equally eye-catching but the
elements are different. It is a more dynamic,
interesting arrangement and creates a stronger
sense of movement and informality.
34
RADIAL SYMMETRY
Radial Balance is created when elements are
repeated around a central point. This occurs
frequently in nature I.e. in flowers, snowflakes
etc.
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