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Special Education 101

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Title: Special Education 101


1
Special Education 101
  • Oklahoma State Department of Education
  • Special Education Services

2
Session Overview
Additional Resources
3
Students with disabilities may have one of the
following documents
  • 504 plan
  • Individualized Education Program (IEP)

4
What is Section 504?
  • Part of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, a
    national civil rights law
  • Prohibits discrimination on the basis of
    disability by any program (including public or
    private schools) that receive federal funds
  • Section 504 defines disability as a person who
    (1) has an impairment that (2) substantially
    limits the students ability to perform (3) one
    or more major life activities.

5
The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
(IDEA) of 2004
  • A federal law which created and governs special
    education.
  • Entitles eligible children with disabilities to
    the specially designed instruction and
    individualized services and supports they need to
    benefit from a free public education.
  • The six principles of IDEA include
  • A Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)
  • Appropriate Evaluation
  • An Individualized Education Program (IEP)
  • Least Restrictive Environment (LRE)
  • Parent and Student Participation in Decision
    Making
  • Procedural Safeguards

6
Eligibility for Special Education Services under
the IDEA
  • Student has a disability
  • The disability has an adverse impact on the
    students education
  • The student has a need for special education
    services
  • Note Upon eligibility determination an
    Individual Education Program (IEP) can be
    developed.

7
What is an IEP?
  • Addresses the students unique needs and
    individual strengths
  • Student specific goals (Academic, life-skills,
    speech, etc.)
  • Provides students with a disability access to the
    general education curriculum.
  • Accommodations
  • Supports (Assistive Technology, Personnel)
  • Special Education Services

8
Side-by-Side Comparison
Section 504 IDEA
Eligibility Determination General disability definition Disability categories need for special education and related services
Plan 504 Plan Individualized Education Program
Enforcement Office for Civil Rights Office of Special Education Programs (Federal) Oklahoma State Department of Education
9
Video Emilianns IEP Team
http//www.readingrockets.org/helping Helping
Struggling Readers
10
  • Present levels serves as a
  • foundation for other
  • components in the IEP
  • Evaluation/assessment data
  • Educational needs identified
  • Goals
  • Services
  • Accommodations

Current Assessment Data
11
  • Strengths and needs are
  • identified through
  • Initial Evaluation
  • Reevaluation Data
  • Existing Data

Student's Strengths
Students Educational Needs
12
Student Specific Goals developed by IEP team
based on Academic Standards
  • Measurable Annual Goals
  • Provide basis for instruction
  • Educational needs related to the disability
  • Related to present levels of Academic performance
  • Meaningful and measurable

13
Services/Accommodations
  • IEP Services Page
  • Type of Service
  • Person Responsible
  • Duration
  • Frequency
  • Accommodations and
  • Supports

Student specific accommodations and supports
14
Examples of Types of Services
  • Related Services
  • Speech/language
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physical Therapy
  • Orientation and Mobility Training
  • Transportation
  • Special Education
  • Monitoring
  • Consultation
  • Collaboration
  • Co-Teaching
  • Lab/Resource classes
  • (Direct Instruction)

15
Eligibility for Special Education Services
  • Request made for evaluation
  • Review of Existing Data (RED)
  • Determination
  • If the student qualifies for special education
    services under a disability category
  • The present levels of performance and educational
    needs of the student and
  • Whether the student needs special education
    and/or related services.

16
Eligibility for Special Education Services
  • Multidisciplinary Evaluation and Eligibility
    Group Summary (MEEGS)
  • Student determined eligible
  • Disability Need IEP developed
  • Student determined not eligible
  • Disability Need Consider Section 504
    Eligibility
  • - Disability Need Consider Educational Needs

17
  • (i) To the maximum extent appropriate, children
    with disabilities are educated with children who
    are not disabled and
  • (ii) special classes, separate schooling, or
    other removal of children with disabilities from
    the regular educational environment occurs only
    when the nature or severity of the disability of
    a child is such that education in regular classes
    with the use of supplementary aids and services
    cannot be achieved satisfactorily.
  • 34 C.F.R. 300.114(a).

18
Placement Decisions
  • LRE decisions are made individually for each
    student.
  • The LRE is the appropriate balance of settings
    and services to meet the students individual
    needs.
  • The district should have an array of services and
    a continuum of educational setting options
    available to meet the individual LRE needs of
    each student.

19
(No Transcript)
20
Educational Setting
  • Regular Classes (full time)
  • special education and related services for less
    than 21 of the day
  • Special Class (part-time)
  • special education and related services for 21 to
    60 of the day.
  • Special Class (full time)
  • special education for more than 60 of the day.
  • Home bound services
  • Instruction in other settings
  • Hospital, institutions or residential facilities
  • Special Schools

21
Types of Services
  • Monitoring
  • The special education teacher monitors the child
    in general education classroom.
  • Consultation
  • The special education teachers meets with the
    regular education teacher on a regular basis.
  • Collaborative Teaching
  • Co-teaching. Two teachers of equal licensure
    provide instruction.
  • Direct Instruction
  • The special education teacher provides direct
    instruction.

22
Inclusion
  • Students with disabilities are supported in
    chronologically age-appropriate general education
    classes in their home schools and receive
    specialized instruction delineated by their
    individualized education programs (IEP's) within
    the context of the core curriculum and general
    class activities.
  • Halvorsen, A.T. Neary, T. (2001). Building
    inclusive schools Tools and strategies for
    success. Needham Heights, MA Allyn Bacon.

23
What it might look like..
  • General education setting
  • Print rich room
  • Cooperative learning groups
  • Hands on activities and centers
  • All students actively engaged
  • Use of technology
  • Room arranged for easy accessibility
  • Room where adaptive equipment is utilized
  • General education and special education setting

24
What it might sound like..
  • Dual teacher instruction
  • Students communicating and helping each other
  • Team work
  • Assistive technology
  • Soothing music

25
The general feeling of the room.
  • Mutual respect
  • A safe place to take chances and explore
  • Caring, friendly environment
  • Family like atmosphere

26
Thasya http//www.youtube.com/watch?v1zWp2K
kOr68 700-1054
27
Including Samuel
http//www.youtube.com/watch?vr-Ex0vtklY0
28
Inclusion Planning
29
The Co-Teach Model as defined by the Council for
Exceptional Children
  • Co-teaching is a service delivery option.
    Students with IEPs receive some or all of their
    specialized instruction and related services in
    the context of the general education classroom.

30
Co-Teach
  • Both professionals participate fully, although
    differently, in the instructional process.
  • General educators maintain primary responsibility
    for the content of the instruction.
  • Special educators hold primary responsibility for
    facilitating the learning process.

31
Co-Teach
  • The students are heterogeneously grouped as a
    class, and both teachers work with all students.
  • Various combinations of students and group sizes
    are used.
  • Each students educational potential is realized.
  • Co-teachers are firmly committed to our
    students, not yours and mine.

32
Co-Teach Clarification
  • It is NOT a pullout special education program
    that has been relocated to the corner of a
    general education classroom.
  • It is NOT a general education classroom with one
    real teacher and one who serves as the help
    or an extra set of hands.

33
Co-Teachers
  • Two or more professionals with equivalent
    licensure are co-teachers
  • One general educator
  • One special educator or specialist
  • Paraprofessionals are NOT considered a co-teacher

34
Types of CoTeaching http//www.teachhub.com
/effective-co-teaching-strategies
  • Supportive Co-teaching One member of the team
    takes the lead role and the other member rotates
    among students to provide support.
  • Parallel Co-teaching - Both teachers instruct
    different heterogeneous groups of students.

35
Types of Co-teaching (continued)
  • Complementary Co-teaching A member of the
    co-teaching team does something to supplement or
    complement the instruction provided by the other
    member of the team (e.g., models note taking on a
    transparency, paraphrases the other co-teachers
    statements).
  • Team Teaching - The members of the team co-teach
    alongside one another and share responsibility
    for planning, teaching, and assessing the
    progress of all students in the class.

36
Co-Teachers Planning Time
  • Shared daily or weekly mutual time
  • Macro period high quality meetings to plan 2-3
    weeks at a time
  • Compensatory time after hours
  • Use of substitute teachers
  • Collaboration working as a staff to build common
    time
  • Schedules such as common specials schedules

37
Co-Teachers Responsibilities
  • General Education Teacher comes prepared with
    themes, projects, student expectations and ideas
    about division of duties and co-teaching
    approaches
  • Special Education Teacher is responsible
    for collaborating about teaching
    responsibilities, completing significant
    adaptations and/or accommodations to the
    assignments for student success and discussing
    student expectations and desired outcomes

38
Co-Teachers Responsibilities (Continued)
  • General Education
  • Begins with instruction, then assess the
    student(s).
  • Learning strategist
  • Content knowledge
  • Curriculum alignment
  • Content development
  • Special Education
  • Begins with assessment, then instruction with the
    student(s)
  • Learning strategist
  • Has the techniques to motivate the exceptional
    child
  • Curriculum adaptation for diverse learners
  • Knowledge of disabilities

39
What is an Accommodation?
  • Discuss with a table partner
  • What is the definition of an accommodation?
  • Who might benefit from an accommodation?

40
  • practices and procedures that provide equitable
    access during instruction and assessment for
    students with disabilities
  • intended to reduce or even eliminate the effects
    of a students disability
  • do not reduce learning expectations
  • must be consistent for classroom instruction,
    classroom assessments, district-wide assessments,
    and statewide assessments

41
Accommodations and Modifications
  • Accommodations- do NOT reduce learning
    expectations, but rather provide a student with
    access to the general curriculum and assessments.
  • Modifications- change, lower, or reduce learning
    expectations. In addition, they increase the gap
    between achievement of students with disabilities
    and expectations for proficiency at grade-level.

42
Practices and procedures in the areas of-
Presentation - Response- Setting -
Timing/Scheduling Provide equitable access
during instruction and assessments for students
with disabilities.
  • Guide http//ok.gov/sde/documents/2014-08-07/okla
    homa-accommodations-guide
  • Synopsis http//ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files
    /Accommodations20Synopsis_0.pdf

43
  • Present Levels of Academic Achievement and
    Functional Performance (PLAAFP)
  • Annual Goals
  • Accommodations to the General Curriculum
  • Previous accommodations
  • Classroom barriers
  • Available resources

44
  • Accommodations must be selected on the basis of
  • the individual students needs, and
  • used consistently for instruction and assessment
    as documented in their IEP or 504 plan.

45
Specific accommodations for each student are
addressed on the Service page of the IEP under
accommodations (or on the Assessment pages of the
IEP) addressing the accommodations in each
subject area.
46
http//ok.gov/sde/documents/2014-08-11/ostp-accomm
odations-placeholder
47
Oklahoma Approved Accommodations
48
  • A change the location in which a student receives
    instruction, participates in an assessment, or
    the conditions of an instructional or assessment
    setting.
  • Examples
  • Individual administration
  • Small group administration

49
  • Provides additional time to complete assignments
    and/or assessments or the way time is organized
  • Examples
  • Extra time
  • Frequent breaks
  • Time of day
  • Multiple test sessions
  • Helpful for students who need time to process
    written text (slow readability), write (due to a
    physical limitation), use an assistive technology
    device, have limited attention, or low energy
    level

50
  • An alternate method of responding from a typical
    pencil/paper format.
  • Examples
  • marking answers in the test booklet (grades 3-8)
    for later transfer by a Test Administrator to an
    Answer Document
  • assistive technology communication device(s)
  • pencil grip and
  • utilize typewriter, word processor, or computer
    without the use of help features (spell check)
    (English II and writing test only).

51
  • Instructional or test materials presented in a
    different manner than standard print.
  • Examples
  • large print or Braille
  • magnifier
  • auditory amplification devices, such as hearing
    aids or noise buffers and
  • read or sign test items if the test is not a
    reading test.

52
Universal Design (UD)
Universal Design for Learning
  • UD originated in architecture and urban planning,
    as part of a movement to begin designing building
    and other structures that would accommodate the
    widest spectrum of users, including those with
    disabilities, right from the start.

http//www.architizer.com/en_us/projects/pictures/
coeh-greensburg-prairie-ramp-house/3927/27147/.Ub
YW1flqmrQ
53
UD Assumptions
Universal Design for Learning
  • Not one size fits all but alternatives for
    everyone.
  • Not added on later but designed from the
    beginning.
  • Not access for some but access for everyone.

54
Choose one discuss
How does the item address a specific need?
How can designing for specific individuals
benefit others?
55
Learner Variability
http//www.youtube.com/watch?v8WClnVjCEVM
104-756
56
Reflect
  • What resonated?
  • Why is the design of a Rubik cube important for
    engagement and mastery?
  • How do ideas of variability context relate to
    your practice (curriculum or classroom)?

57
Definition
Universal Design for Learning
  • Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a
    scientifically valid framework for guiding
    educational practice that
  • (a) provides flexibility in the ways information
    is presented, in the ways students respond or
    demonstrate knowledge and skills, and in the
    ways students are engaged and
  • (b) reduces barriers in instruction, provides
    appropriate accommodations, supports, and
    challenges, and maintains high achievement
    expectations for all students, including
    students with disabilities and students who
    are limited English proficient.
  • (Higher Education Opportunity Act)

58
  • Universal Design for Learning is a proactive
    design of curricula (educational goals, methods,
    materials, and assessments) that enable all
    individuals to gain knowledge, skills, and
    enthusiasm for learning.

http//www.cast.org
59
Differentiation For specific learners in the
classroom based on knowledge of who those
learners are.
Universal Design for Learning
Differentiation UDL
UDL Planning for all students at the beginning,
even though future students are unknown.
http//www.gpb.org/education/common-core/udl-part-
1
60
What is Universal Design for Learning?
Universal Design for Learning
  • More than lecture format (one delivery method).
  • Designing quality instruction from the onset of
    the lesson.
  • Providing multiple opportunities for students to
    learn, acquire and demonstrate understanding of
    the material presented.
  • Creating experiences for students regardless of
    disability to participate in the lesson through a
    variety of mediums.

61
Universal Design for Learning
https//www.google.com/url?sairctjqesrcsso
urceimagescdcadrjadocidpkIDBxOnUqXlRMtbnid
m8kZrpcc3NbIrMved0CAUQjRwurlhttp3A2F2Fber
gman-udl.blogspot.com2F2011_09_01_archive.htmlei
jyW2UeG7K9O1qQGe-oGoCgbvmbv.47534661,d.aWMpsig
AFQjCNFM9DaecqIDeEFJssrBKI-2jAQ1AAust1370978044
735105
62
Brain Research
Affective
Recognition
Strategic
Why of learning Motivation to learn
How of learning Task performance
What of learning See, hear, read
Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST)
63
Why encourage UDL?
Universal Design for Learning
  • Benefit to all learners (ELL, gifted, special
    ed).
  • Healthy learning environment (respect).
  • Positive experiences conducive to learning.
  • Learners acquire skills in a medium of their
    strength/interest.
  • Lessons are designed with integrity from the
    onset. Long term benefit. Purposeful planning for
    all rather than consideration of a few for short
    term.

64
Recognition Networks
  • List the objects you recognize in this picture.

Unexpected Visitor Ilya Repin
65
Strategic Network
  • 1. Ages? 2. Tasks?

Unexpected Visitor Ilya Repin
66
Eye Movements
l
Identifying the ages of the people
Determining what the people were doing before the
visitor arrived
67
Affective Network
  • What grabs your attention?

Unexpected Visitor Ilya Repin
68
Activity Summary
Affective
Recognition
Strategic
  • All three brain networks are working when you do
    something as simple as view an image.
  • Each network contributes something vital to the
    task.
  • This is true of everything we do and everything
    we learn.

http//www.cast.org
69
Three Principles of UDL
http//www.cast.org/library/video/udl_guidelines/i
ndex.html 000-622
70
UDL Principles
http//www.cast.org
71
http//www.edutopia.org/masterful-teacher-jonathan
-winn-calculus-video 000-633
72
Supporting Recognition Learning
  • Provide alternative formats for presenting
    information.
  • Provide multiple examples
  • Highlight critical features
  • Provide multiple media and formats
  • Support background context

http//www.cast.org
73
http//www.youtube.com/watch?vdTxFYf50l-4
000-658
74
Supporting Strategic Learning
Provide Multiple Means of Action and Expression
  • Provide alternative means for action and
    expression.
  • Provide flexible models of skilled performance
  • Provide opportunities to practice with supports
  • Provide ongoing, relevant feedback
  • Offer flexible opportunities for demonstrating
    skill

http//www.cast.org
75
http//2.bp.blogspot.com/_6iyyhNHJjtI/TVBiBAuXp6I/
AAAAAAAABPc/iWdgoYbMUck/s1600/montessori_elementar
y_lg.jpg
76
https//www.teachingchannel.org/videos/increase-en
gagement-and-understanding 000-444
77
Supporting Affective Learning
  • Provide alternative means for engagement.
  • Offer choices of content and tools
  • Offer adjustable levels of challenge
  • Offer choices of rewards
  • Offer choices of learning context

http//www.cast.org
78
Universal Design for Learning
  • All 3 UDL principles are not intended to be
    incorporated into every lesson plan. Rather, they
    guide instruction over time.
  • Some students may need additional support to meet
    an individual needs. Accommodations are still
    appropriate (i.e. Braille text).

79
  • Universal Design for Learning choices of content
    delivery (oral, sight, listening, hands-on),
    choices of demonstrating knowledge of skill
  • Utilizing available resources leveled text,
    personnel, small grouping, variety of activities,
    small manageable steps, clear directions,
    re-teaching
  • Differentiated instruction based on students
    needs
  • Accommodations including assistive technology

80
  • Leveled text
  • Activate students prior knowledge
  • Small grouping
  • Variety of activities
  • Small, manageable steps
  • Clear directions
  • Re-teaching
  • Focus core instruction on Academic Standards

81
  • Ensure that students are working toward
    grade-level standards by using a range of
    instructional strategies based on varied
    strengths and student needs.
  • http//ok.gov/sde/oklahoma-academic-standards

82
Reading
  • Get Ready to Read http//www.getreadytoread.org/
  • Reading A-Z http//www.readinga-z.com/
  • Florida Center for Reading Research
    http//www.fcrr.org/for-educators/

83
Mathematics
  • AplusMath http//www.aplusmath.com/
  • Math Fact Café http//www.mathfactcafe.com/
  • Khan Academy https//www.khanacademy.org/

84
  • Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA)
  • Evaluation tool to identify behavior,
    triggers/causes, frequency and nature of behavior
  • Used to establish appropriate goals to address
    specific areas of concern.
  • Used as basis for establishing a Behavior
    Intervention Plan (BIP)
  • Available upon request at any point during the
    year for student with an IEP.

85
Functional Behavioral Assessment process
  • Describe and verify the seriousness of the target
    behavior.
  • Refine the definition of the target behavior.
  • Collect information on possible functions of the
    target behavior.
  • Analyze information.
  • Generate a hypothesis statement regarding
    probable function of target behavior.
  • Test the hypothesis statement regarding the
    function of the target behavior.

Information provided by the Center for Effective
Collaboration and Practice
86
Questions to Address When Planning for a
Functional Behavior Assessment
  • How often does the target behavior occur how
    long does it last?
  • Where does the behavior typically occur/never
    occur?
  • Who is present for the occurrence/nonoccurrence
    of the behavior?
  • What is going on during the occurrence/nonoccurren
    ce of the behavior?
  • When is the behavior most likely/least likely to
    occur?
  • How does the student react to the usual
    consequences that follow the behavior?

FBA information provided by Dr. Laura Riffel,
Ph.D.
87
Outcome of a Functional Behavioral Assessment
  • A FBA should result in the following
  • An operational definition(s) of target
    behavior(s)
  • Identification of the contexts (locations,
    activities, routines, times of day, people) where
    the target behavior(s) is most likely, and least
    likely
  • Identification of the specific antecedent events
    (setting events and discriminative stimuli) most
    likely to predict (occasion) the identified
    target behavior(s) and
  • Identification of the consequence(s) that
    maintain (reinforce) the target behavior.

88
Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP)
  • Addressing the changes within the educational
    setting to improve the behavioral success of
    students. Changes include
  • how the environment will be changed to prevent
    occurrences of targeted behavior.
  • describes the teaching that will occur to give
    the student alternative ways of behaving.
  • describes the consequences that will be provided
    to (a) encourage positive behavior, (b) limit
    inadvertent reward of problem behavior, and (c)
    where appropriate, discourage targeted behavior.

89
Manifestation Determination (MD)
  • A process in which school district personnel,
    relevant members of a students Individualized
    Education Program (IEP) team, and a students
    parents meet to determine if a students
    misconduct, which led to a disciplinary change of
    placement, was caused by, or had a direct and
    substantial relationship, to a student disability.

90
Manifestation DeterminationLegal Basics
  • Long-term suspensions, suspensions over 10
    consecutive days, and expulsions are changes in
    placement and, therefore, can not be used for
    disciplinary purposes unless the procedural
    safeguards of the IDEA are followed.
  • A Manifestation Determination is a required
    procedural safeguard under the IDEA when a
    students placement is changed because of
    disciplinary actions.

91
Manifestation DeterminationPurpose
  • The primary purposes of a MD are to
  • a) Determine if a students misconduct was caused
    by, or had a direct and substantial relationship
    to, his or her disability.
  • b) Determine if a students misconduct was the
    direct result of a schools failure to implement
    his or her IEP.

92
Manifestation Determination Results
  • If the Students Misconduct was not a
    Manifestation of his or her Disability
  • The LEA may discipline the student in the same
    manner as it would discipline students without
    disabilities.
  • In such a situation, the LEA must continue to
    provide special education services that allow the
    student to receive a Free Appropriate Public
    Education (FAPE).

93
Manifestation DeterminationResults
  • If the Students Misconduct was a Manifestation
    of his or her Disability
  • The students IEP team shall
  • Conduct a functional behavioral assessment and
    implement a behavior intervention plan, or
  • Review the students existing BIP, and modify it
    as necessary.
  • The student should be returned to his or her
    previous placement unless the parent and LEA
    agree to a change of placement.

94
  • The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB)
    prohibits schools from excluding students with
    disabilities from the educational accountability
    system.
  • Excluding students with disabilities from testing
    is also a violation of the Individuals with
    Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

95
  • States are required to provide accommodations and
    alternate assessments as needed, to ensure that
    students with disabilities fully participate.
  • These assessment requirements were put into place
    as a way to determine if the school is adequately
    educating every student in critical core academic
    areas.

96
  • OCCT Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test
  • With accommodations
  • Without accommodations
  • OMAAP Oklahoma Modified Alternate Assessment
    Program (EOI End of Instruction 2nd time test
    takers only)
  • OAAP Oklahoma Alternate Assessment Program and
    Dynamic Learning Maps

97
Providing Access to Assessment
  • To ensure successful participation we must
  • Understand the needs of students with
    disabilities
  • Select appropriate accommodations that improve
    access
  • Focus core instruction on the Oklahoma Academic
    Standards
  • Utilize the principles of Universal Design for
    Learning
  • Consider access to the curriculum when
    determining LRE
  • Utilize formative assessments
  • Make better use of technology in assessments

98
Providing Access to Assessment
  • Providing students with disabilities with the
    tools necessary for success in the classroom and
    to show their knowledge and skills in a regular
    assessment format means that they are truly
    included in the world of education.
  • NICHY (2007). Assessment and Accommodations.
    Evidence for Education. 2(1), p. 10

99
Alternative Routes to a Diploma
  • Modified Proficiency Score
  • Alternative Tests
  • End of Course Projects

100
Modified Proficiency Score
101
Alternate Tests
  • A Few Examples
  • CLEP
  • Work Keys
  • ACT/PLAN
  • PSAT
  • These tests may not be given in lieu of
    End-of-Instruction (EOI) exams.

102
EndofCourse Projects
Four projects for Algebra I One project for Algebra II One project for Geometry One project for Biology I Four projects for U.S. History One project with many options for English II 14 projects for English III
  • Categories A, B, and C
  • Memo Regarding Category Options
  • http//ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/Additiona
    l20ACE20EOC20Projects.pdf
  • These projects may not be used in lieu of
    End-of-Instruction (EOI) exams.

103
Additional Resources
  • http//ok.gov/sde/documents-forms
  • http//www.cec.sped.org/
  • http//iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/
  • http//www.ok.gov/sde/special-education

104
Questions/Comments
105
Oklahoma State Department of Education Special
Education Services 2500 N. Lincoln Blvd. Oklahoma
City, OK 73105 405-521-3351
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