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Title: Powerpoint (Revised 5/8/2008) available at:


1
Future PASSHE Academic Libraries Collaboration
sweeney_at_njit.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Powerpoint (Revised 5/8/2008) available at
http//library1.njit.edu/staff-folders/sweeney/

2
Please take a minute and draft your own one
sentence definitions. Define an academic library
in one sentence. Define the PASSHE library
system in one sentence.
3
The library connects us with insights and
knowledge, painfully extracted from nature, of
the greatest minds that ever were, with the best
teachers, drawn from the entire planet and from
all of our history, to instruct us without
tiring, and to inspire us to make our own
contribution to the collective knowledge of the
human species. p. 282
Carl Sagan, Cosmos Random House, New York, 1980
p. 282
4
The library connects us with insights and
knowledge, painfully extracted from nature, of
the greatest minds that ever were, with the best
teachers, drawn from the entire planet and from
all of our history, to instruct us without
tiring, and to inspire us to make our own
contribution to the collective knowledge of the
human species. p. 282
This is the essence of scholarly communication
and the primary role of the academic library.
Carl Sagan, Cosmos Random House, New York, 1980
p. 282
5
The changing patterns of research and learning in
higher education As part of a university or
college, the academic library is not an end in
itself. It supports research, learning and
scholarship and has always had to adapt as
research and learning behaviors change. In the
current network environment, this change is
uneven and poses great challenges for libraries.
p. 11
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
6
At NJIT, One Paradigm Shifted in 2002
Once in awhile, the prevailing paradigm will
change.
7
Agenda 900 1030 Where do we want to
be? 1030 1045 Break 1045 1200
Where are we now? 1200 1245 Lunch 1245
230 Small Group SWOT Analysis where we want
to be. 245 400 Entire group share analysis
and build consensus on the future planning
direction.
8
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Assets E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Active Environments Bigger Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Open Access Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Multi-Media Licensing Learning Objects
9
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Assets E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Active Environments Bigger Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Open Access Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Multi-Media Licensing Learning Objects
10
Future PASSHE Academic Libraries Collaboration
sweeney_at_njit.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Kohl, David F. and Tom Sanville. More Bang for
the Buck Increasing Effectiveness of Library
Expenditures Through Cooperation Library Trends,
Vol. 54 no. 3 pp394-410
11
Future PASSHE Academic Libraries Collaboration
sweeney_at_njit.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
12
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Assets E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Active Environments Bigger Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Open Access Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Multi-Media Licensing Learning Objects
13
Future PASSHE Academic Libraries Collaboration
sweeney_at_njit.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Long Tail The economics of abundance.
Use
Book Titles
Anderson, Chris. The Long Tail Why the Future of
Business Is Selling Less of More (2006)
Hyperion. New York
14
Future PASSHE Academic Libraries Collaboration
sweeney_at_njit.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
We are entering an era of unprecedented choice
and thats a good thing. p. 169
Anderson, Chris. The Long Tail Why the Future of
Business Is Selling Less of More (2006)
Hyperion. New York
15
Future PASSHE Academic Libraries Collaboration
sweeney_at_njit.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
..there are far more niche goods than hits the
cost of reaching those niches is now falling
dramatically. These filters recommendations
can drive demand down the Tail. There are still
hits and niches, but the hits are relatively less
popular and the niches relatively more so. .
p. 53
Anderson, Chris. The Long Tail Why the Future of
Business Is Selling Less of More (2006)
Hyperion. New York
16
Future PASSHE Academic Libraries Collaboration
sweeney_at_njit.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Library Materials Budget Library Materials Budget Library Materials Budget
1,131,777
259,772
76,698
547,900
290,088
866,590
2,013,101
780,062
584,643
331,420
983,441
842,211
727,241
1,770,925
11,205,869
Use
Book Titles
Anderson, Chris. The Long Tail Why the Future of
Business Is Selling Less of More (2006)
Hyperion. New York
17
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Assets E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Active Environments Bigger Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Open Access Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Multi-Media Licensing Learning Objects
18
The underlying focus for budgetary attention,
whether times are flush or flushed, should be a
concern to get the most value out of each dollar
spent. P. 394
Kohl, David F. and Tom Sanville. More Bang for
the Buck Increasing Effectiveness of Library
Expenditures Through Cooperation Library Trends,
Vol. 54 no. 3 pp394-410
19
Possibly the most well-known intersection of
automation and consortia has been the Big Deal,
or variations on group electronic journal
licensing, with the resultant tremendous increase
in journal literature access for patrons and the
leveraging of the collections dollar this model
of of journal purchase has made possible. p. 400
Kohl, David F. and Tom Sanville. More Bang for
the Buck Increasing Effectiveness of Library
Expenditures Through Cooperation Library Trends,
Vol. 54 no. 3 pp394-410
20
The most common misunderstanding involving the
Big Deal and its variants is that it is a
mechanism to save money and reduce library
expenditures. P. 401
Kohl, David F. and Tom Sanville. More Bang for
the Buck Increasing Effectiveness of Library
Expenditures Through Cooperation Library Trends,
Vol. 54 no. 3 pp394-410
21
Being able to spread the operating and
development costs among multiple libraries
minimizes duplication of effort, builds a
facility that all members can use, and creates a
collective body of content. P. 406
Kohl, David F. and Tom Sanville. More Bang for
the Buck Increasing Effectiveness of Library
Expenditures Through Cooperation Library Trends,
Vol. 54 no. 3 pp394-410
22
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Assets E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Active Environments Bigger Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Open Access Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Multi-Media Licensing Learning Objects
23
Lawrence of Arabia
The Great Escape
Best War Movies
Apocalypse Now
Schindlers List
The Terminal
Catch Me If You CanDir Frank Darabont
Dir Steven Spielberg
Minority Report
Artificial Intelligence AI
Actor Tom Hanks
Actor Tom Hanks
Actor Tom Hanks
Actor Tom Hanks
Actor Tom Hanks
Youve Got Mail (1998) Dir Nora
Ephron Starring Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Parker
Posey, Greg Kinnear, Jean Stapleton
Cast Away (2000) Dir Robert Zemeckis Starring To
m Hanks, Helen Hunt, Valerie Wildman, Geoffrey
Blake, Jenifer Lewis
The Green Mile (1999) Dir Frank
Darabont Starring Tom Hanks, Michael Clarke
Duncan, David Morse, Bonnie Hunt, James
Cromwell
Saving Private Ryan (1998) Dir Steven
Spielberg Starring Tom Hanks, Tom Sizemore,
Jeremy Davies, Edward Burns, Giovanni Ribisi
Toy Story 2 (1999) Dir Lee Unkrich Starring Tom
Hanks   Tim Allen Don Rickles   Jim Varney
Wallace Shawn  
The favorite online Millennial environment, is
virtual, interactive, multimedia, full motion,
personalized, customized, and socially
networked.
Rich, this is one of my favorites. Janet
Media Consumers
24
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Assets E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Active Environments Bigger Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Open Access Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Multi-Media Licensing Learning Objects
25
Teaching-Centered Learning-Centered
Deliver instruction Produce learning
Transfer of knowledge from teacher to student Discovery and construction of knowledge
Active faculty Active students
One teaching style Multiple learning styles
Curriculum development Learning technologies development
Quantity and quality of resources Quantity and quality of outcomes
Robert B. Barr and John Tagg, "From Teaching to
Learning A New Paradigm for Undergraduate
Education," Change, vol. 27, no. 6
(November/December 1995) 1225.
26
Teaching-Centered Learning-Centered
Quality of faculty Quality of students
Time held constant learning varies Learning held constant time varies
Learning is linear and cumulative Learning is a nesting and interacting of frameworks
Promote recall Promote understanding
Faculty are lecturers Faculty are designers of learning environments
Learning is competitive and individualistic Learning is cooperative and collaborative
Robert B. Barr and John Tagg, "From Teaching to
Learning A New Paradigm for Undergraduate
Education," Change, vol. 27, no. 6
(November/December 1995) 1225.
27
  • Learning Strategies for Millennials
  • Increase teacher student interaction feedback
  • Engage students (motivation involvement)
  • Accelerate student learning
  • Increase experiential learning (gaming
    simulations, role playing)
  • Increase learning options
  • Increase peer-to-peer (collaboration) learning
  • Offer more pull web based learning options
  • Offer more interactive multimedia learning.

Millennial Learning Strategies
28
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Assets E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Active Environments Bigger Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Open Access Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Multi-Media Licensing Learning Objects
29
Two proven innovation strategies are the
common-course redesign strategy and the flex
program and service redesign strategy. These
strategies use IT innovatively to improve
accountability-that is, to improve and account
for institutional performance-whenever measurably
improved academic results and reduced unit costs
are simultaneous goals. p. 79
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Graves, William. Improving Institutional
Performance through IT-Enabled Innovation.
EDUCAUSE Review Nov/Dec 2005 79-98
Engagement Productivity
30
With a few important IT exceptions, these
investments did not directly seek to reduce
long-term unit costs and/or dampen spiraling
tuition increases and, not surprisingly, did not
do so whether or not they used technology to
enable innovation. As a result, these
innovations did not increase productivity but
instead either added to long-term operating
expenditures or proved unsustainable after the
loss of special funding. p. 84
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Graves, William. Improving Institutional
Performance through IT-Enabled Innovation.
EDUCAUSE Review Nov/Dec 2005 79-98
Engagement Productivity
31
  • To one degree or another, all thirty projects
    share the following six characteristics
  • Whole course redesign
  • Active learning (learner centered)
  • Computer-based learning resources
  • Master learning (scheduled milestones for
    completion)
  • On-demand help
  • Alternative staffing (sometimes grad and
    undergrads) p. 30

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Twigg, Carol A. Improving Learning and Reducing
Costs New Models for Online Learning. EDUCAUSE
Review Sep/Oct 2003 28-38
Engagement, Assessment Productivity
32
At UMass, attendance in the traditional format
averaged 67 percent in the redesigned course,
attendance averaged 90 percent, which correlated
significantly to performance on exams. In
addition exams no longer emphasize recall of
factual material or definitions of terms 67
percent of the questions now require reasoning or
problem-solving skills, compared with 21 percent
previously p. 32
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Twigg, Carol A. Improving Learning and Reducing
Costs New Models for Online Learning. EDUCAUSE
Review Sep/Oct 2003 28-38
Engagement, Assessment Productivity
33
Preliminary results show that all thirty
institutions reduced costs by about 40 percent on
average, with a range of 20 to 84 percent. p.
86
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Twigg, Carol A. Improving Learning and Reducing
Costs New Models for Online Learning. EDUCAUSE
Review Sep/Oct 2003 28-38
Engagement, Assessment Productivity
34
Currently in higher education, both on campus
and online, we individualize faculty practice
(that is, we allow individual faculty members
great latitude in course development and
delivery) and standardize the student learning
experience (that, is we treat all students in a
course as if their learning needs, interests, and
abilities were the same). Instead we need to do
just the opposite individualize student learning
and standardize faculty practice. p. 38
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Twigg, Carol A. Improving Learning and Reducing
Costs New Models for Online Learning. EDUCAUSE
Review Sep/Oct 2003 28-38
Engagement, Assessment Productivity
35
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Asset Management E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Interactive Environments Library Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Multi-Media Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Remote Assistance Licensing Open Access Learning Objects
36
Blended Librarian An academic librarian who
combines the traditional skill set of
librarianship with the information technologist's
hardware/software skills, and the instructional
or educational designer's ability to apply
technology appropriately in the teaching-learning
process.
Bell, Stephen J. and John Shank. The blended
librarian A blueprint for redefining the
teaching and learning role of academic librarians
. CRL News, 65.7 July/August 2004
Replace Library Catalog
37
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Assets E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Active Environments Bigger Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Open Access Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Multi-Media Licensing Learning Objects
38
  • Examples
  • Managing the Digital Enterprise (Rappa-North
    Carolina State)
  • Solar System Collaboratory (Colorado)
  • Virtual chemistry experiments (Davidson)
  • U.S. History Videos (History Channel)
  • BoilerCast (Purdue - podcasts, vcasts)
  • Game Based Learning Sites (Marc Prensky)
  • Math Emporium (Virginia Tech)
  • Building bridges (Civil Engineering-Nova)
  • Physics Tutorial Modules Andersen Center (RPI)
  • Collaborative Learning Table (RPI)
  • Immediate stock market quotes (Yahoo Finance)
  • SearchPath information literacy tutorial
    (Rutgers)

Examples
39
Future PASSHE Academic Libraries Collaboration
sweeney_at_njit.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Examples
40
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Assets E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Active Environments Bigger Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Open Access Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Multi-Media Licensing Learning Objects
41
Based on these results, the best payoffs in
higher graduation rates from strategically
targeted institutional budgetary enhancements
would seem to come from increasing per student
expenditures for instruction (1.99 percentage
points), followed closely by library (1.77) and
more distantly by physical plant (1.07) and
nonlibrary academic (0.98).
Hamrick, Florence, John H Schuh and Mack C.
Shelley. Predicting Higher Education Graduation
Rates from Institutional Characteristics and
Resource Allocation Education Policy Analysis
Archives 1219 (2003) http//epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v1
2n19
42
This study demonstrates that library
expenditures and professional staff have a
significant positive effect on student
retention. p. 565
Mezick, Elizabeth M. Return on Investment
Libraries and Student Retention. The Journal
of Academic Librarianship 335 (2007) pp561-566
43
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Asset Management E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Interactive Environments Library Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Multi-Media Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Remote Assistance Licensing Open Access Learning Objects
44
Self-service moving to self-sufficiency Banking,
shopping, entertainment, research, travel, job
seeking, chattingpick a category and one theme
will ring clearself-service. People of all age
groups are spending more time online doing things
for themselves. Users DO know what theyre
doing! Industry Pundit. p. 4
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
Self Sufficiency
45
Bankers dont market distance banking or
label customers as traditional of
nontraditional. They realize that different
customers have different needs and preferences
for obtaining services. Banks also know that
time-shifted online self-service can reduce costs
while increasing customer satisfaction, which is
why they frequently offer incentives for
self-service. p. 86
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Graves, William. Improving Institutional
Performance through IT-Enabled Innovation.
EDUCAUSE Review Nov/Dec 2005 79-98
Self Sufficiency
46
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Asset Management E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Interactive Environments Library Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Multi-Media Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Remote Assistance Licensing Open Access Learning Objects
47
Satisfaction Surveys confirm that information
consumers are pleased with the results of their
online activitiesLibrarians worry that
information found using search engines does not
have the credibility and authority of information
found in libraries, and that people will not
learn basic information seeking skills, and so
leave much valuable material undiscovered. P. 4
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
Satisfaction
48
Satisfaction Yet most library visitors also
bypass the reference desk, boldly setting off to
find answers on their own. The indisputable fact
is that information and content on the open Web
is far easier and more convenient to find and
access than are information and content in
physical or virtual libraries. The information
consumer types a term into a search box, clicks a
button and sees results immediately. The
information consumer is satisfied. p. 4
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
Satisfaction
49
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Asset Management E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Interactive Environments Library Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Multi-Media Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Remote Assistance Licensing Open Access Learning Objects
50
Seamlessness The traditional separation of
academic, leisure and work time is fusing into a
seamless world aided by nomadic computing devices
that support multiple activities. This phenomenon
is most marked among young adults. Their world
is a seamless infosphere where the boundaries
of work, play and study are gone, a marked
contrast to the compartmentalized lifestyles of
their parents.
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
Seamlessness
51
Seamlessness Contrast this seamless world with
the one students experience at most libraries.
Library environments still cater to an older
generation with separate spheres of information,
frequently designating different computers for
access to library content than the ones used for
e-mail and writing papers. p. 4
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
Seamlessness
52
  • Research and Learning Landscape Major trends
  • Reduced funding
  • Proliferation of e-learning
  • Lifelong learning in the community
  • The changing pattern of research and learning in
    higher education
  • Institutional repositories, scholarly
    communication and open access
  • New flows of scholarly materials p. 14

OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
Proliferation of E-learning
53
Proliferation of e-learning E-learning has a
presence in most large corporations and in an
ever increasing number of college and university
courses. Course management systems such as WebCT
and Blackboard allow for the creation of a
virtual classroom where faculty and students can
interact and post curriculum related material.
p. 14
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
Proliferation of E-learning
54
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Asset Management E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Interactive Environments Library Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Multi-Media Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Remote Assistance Licensing Open Access Learning Objects
55
Proliferation of e-learning Companies purchase
e-learning for workers for many of the same
reasons that individuals take university courses
online travel time is reduced, infrastructure
costs are low, delivery is platform-independent
and learning anywhere and anytime is enabled. And
e-learning is big business. E-learning companies
are earning millions of dollars annually. p. 14
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
Proliferation of E-learning
56
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Asset Management E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Interactive Environments Library Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Multi-Media Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Remote Assistance Licensing Open Access Learning Objects
57
New standards There are two main areas of
standards development. Repository and content
standards are emerging to manage digital objects.
Of note are OAIS (Open Archival Information
System), preservation metadata, content
packaging, content exchange and metadata that
support operations on objects. Secondly,
applications standards are being developed in the
areas of cross-searching, harvesting, resolution
and specialized library transaction applications
such as NCIP and ISO ILL. p. 11
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
58
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Asset Management E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Interactive Environments Library Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Multi-Media Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Remote Assistance Licensing Open Access Learning Objects
59
The changing patterns of research and learning in
higher education The underlying challenges and
opportunities involve the social and
institutional changes necessary to effect the
transition from traditional support for
scholarship to the digital, distributed, seamless
environments that will be necessary in the
future. Consequently, coordinated management and
disclosure of digital assets of
institutionslearning objects, data sets,
e-prints, theses, dissertations and so onwill be
necessary. p. 11
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
60
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Asset Management E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Interactive Environments Library Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Multi-Media Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Remote Assistance Licensing Open Access Learning Objects
61
The changing patterns of research and learning in
higher education Currently, there are no settled
patterns or standards. As well, the outputs of
digital scholarship are often in complex and
nonstandard forms. The academic community will
need to develop a better understanding of ways in
which scholarship and learning activities are
created, used, reused and preserved in the
digital environment. p. 11
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
62
The changing patterns of research and learning in
higher education It is clear that a new ecology
and a new economy for scholarly materials are
being formed. In the past, the flow of research
and learning outputs traveled through formal,
linear publishing mechanisms. We are seeing the
emergence of a variety of repository frameworks,
metadata aggregation services, and richer content
interconnection and repurposing that are changing
how we think about data and its uses. p. 11
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
63
The changing patterns of research and learning in
higher education The library has the opportunity
to take a leadership role in developing policies
and programs that contribute to a coherent,
institution-wide knowledge management system.
p. 11
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
64
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Asset Management E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Interactive Environments Library Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Multi-Media Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Remote Assistance Licensing Open Access Learning Objects
65
As we look ahead to the twenty first century, we
need to change our thinking about how to develop
and structure library services. We need to
evolve into agencies that focus not on
collections, but on the needs of users. We need
to develop facilities that recognize, embrace,
and encourage the collaborative social nature of
learning. We must create learning environments
that empower student learning, enabling them to
turn information into knowledge. p. 11
Martin, Robert S. Libraries and librarians in
the 21st Century Fostering a Learning Society.
CRL News, 65.11 (2004) 668-671
66
In fact, we foresee a pending convergence of
museums, libraries, archives, and other agencies
of cultural and educational content, along with
unexpected partners in the environment such as
broadcasters.
Martin, Robert S. Libraries and librarians in
the 21st Century Fostering a Learning Society.
CRL News, 65.11 (2004) 668-671
67
  • ..the digital library of the future..
  • It will be a comprehensive collection of
    resources important for scholarship, teaching and
    learning.
  • It will be readily accessible to all types of
    users, novice as well as the experienced.
  • It will be managed and maintained by
    professionals who see their role as stewards of
    the intellectual and cultural heritages of the
    world.

Marcum, Deanna. Requirements for the Future
Digital Library. The Journal of Academic
Librarianship, 29.5 (2003) 276-279
68
Scholarly Communication Digital Preservation Information Competency Institutional Repositories
Digital Asset Management E-Learning Proliferation Learning Commons Consortia Advantages
Redesigned Courses Migration from Print Blended Hybrid Librarians Long Tail Bigger, Common, Shared Collections
Self Sufficiency Technology Convergence Interactive Environments Library Catalogs Accelerators
Seamlessness Satisfaction Multi-Media Curating Content
Personal Information Management Information Economics Intellectual Property Redeveloped Repurposed Library Space
Learner Centered Remote Assistance Licensing Open Access Learning Objects
Library Consortia Straegies
69
For example, it is easy to imagine that some
combination of World Cat and Google Books could
replace the librarys catalog. p. 6
Will Google and World Cat be the major discovery
tools? Will the library catalog become just a
locator tool?
Lewis, David. A Strategy for Academic Libraries
in the First Quarter of the 21st Century. 2007
https//idea.iupui.edu8443/dspace/bitstream/1805/
953/1/DWLewis_Strategy.pdf,
Replace Library Catalog
70
Are we automating nineteenth-century
librarianship? Fred Kilgour, 1977.
OCLC Environmental Scan Pattern Recognition
(2003) http//www.oclc.org/reports/escan/
71
Future PASSHE Academic Libraries Collaboration
sweeney_at_njit.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Thanks for your kind attention.
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