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Content Literacy Practices 2011

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Title: Content Literacy Practices 2011


1
Content Literacy Practices 2011
Day Three
2
Parameters
  • Everyone is a participant.
  • Silence technology (cell phones, computers,
    etc.).
  • Minimize side bar conversations.
  • Abstain from electronic conversations.
  • Respect time.
  • Be receptive to learning and others opinions.
  • Have fun learning together. ?

3
Research
  • Literacy is a gateway to achievement and
    opportunity. On average, college graduates earn
    more than their high school graduate
    counterparts, while high school dropouts are four
    times more likely than college graduates to be
    unemployed. In addition, regardless of
    educational attainment, higher levels of literacy
    translate into higher earnings. Yet only 3 out of
    10 eighth-graders in the United States today meet
    current standards for reading proficiency. Poor
    readers and thinkers in elementary and middle
    school are not on track for success in school and
    for high school graduation. Failure to achieve
    certain levels of critical-thinking skills in
    high school narrows employment prospects and
    limits preparedness for civic participation
    (National Governors Association, 2005).

4
Strategic Social Studies Lesson
  • 6th Grade
  • United States StudiesReconstruction to the
    Present
  • The Great Depression

5
Spiraling Standards
  • Course of Study Content 7 Identify causes of
    the Great Depression.
  • Describe the effects of the Great Depression
    on the people of the United States.
  • 4th Grade Alabama Studies
  • Course of Study Standard 12 Explain effects of
    the events of the 1920s and the Great Depression
    on different socioeconomic groups.
  • - Examples effects of Great Depression
    over cropping of land, unemployment, poverty,
    establishment of new federal programs.
  • 9th Grade World History to the Present
  • Course of Study Standard 13 Explain challenges
    of the post World War I period.
  • Identify causes of the Great Depression.
  • Characterizing the global impact of the Great
    Depression.

6
ARMT Reading Standard
  • Content Standard 4
  • Recognize the use of text elements,
    including implied main idea, explicit
    cause/effect relationships, and persuasive
    techniques, in sixth-grade textual/functional
    materials.
  • AHSGE Link
  • Standard VII
  • The student will understand the Great
    Depression and World War II.
  • Objective 1
  • Analyze the advent and impact of the Great
    Depression and the New Deal on American Life.

7
Social Studies Agenda
  • Daily Outcomes Identify the causes and effects
    of the Great Depression and relate the events to
    modern economic times.
  • Before Think-Write-Pair-Share
  • During Cause and Effect Graphic Organizer
  • After One Pager

8
Before
  • Think-Write-Pair-Share
  • Procedure
  • Think about the hardships the economy is facing
    today or has faced in the past year.
  • Write down your thoughts.
  • Pair with a partner.
  • Share your thoughts with your partner. Choose
    two thoughts to discuss with group.
  • Each team of partners share in a whole-class
    discussion.

9
Chunk the text
  • Chunk 1 The Stock Market
  • Chunk 2 The Great Depression
  • Chunk 3 Credit Crisis
  • Chunk 4 Joblessness and Poverty

10
DuringChunk 1 The Stock Market
  • Follow along as the first portion of
  • Chunk 1 is read aloud.

11
Topic Cause Effect Connections Vocabulary
Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1
The Stock Market
The Boom
The Crash
Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2
The Great Depression
Unbalanced Economy
Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3
Credit Crisis
Unbalanced Economy
Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4
Joblessness/Poverty
The value of stocks plunged overnight.
The U.S. entered the worst domestic crisis since
the Civil War.
The PACT program is in crisis because of the
stock market.
Prosperity- moving up in the ranks of wealth.
12
DuringChunk 1 The Boom
  • Read silently the section entitled The Boom.
  • Read along as I reread the section aloud.
  • Lift information from the text onto the graphic
    organizer together with the class We Do.

13
Topic Cause Effect Connections Vocabulary
Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1
The Stock Market The value of stocks plunged overnight. The U.S. entered the worst domestic crisis since the Civil War. The PACT program is in crisis because of the stock market. Prosperity- moving up in the ranks of wealth.
The Boom Investors did not have money to purchase stock. When I dont have lunch money, I buy on credit.
The Crash
Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2
The Great Depression
Unbalanced Economy
Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3
Credit Crisis
Unbalanced Economy
Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4
Joblessness/Poverty
On margin on credit Stock exchange a system
for buying and selling shares.
They bought on margin.
14
DuringChunk 1 The Crash
  • Read silently the section entitled The Crash.
  • Read along as I reread the section aloud.
  • Lift information from the text onto the graphic
    organizer together with the class We Do.

15
Topic Cause Effect Connections Vocabulary
Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1
The Stock Market The value of stocks plunged overnight. The U.S. entered the worst domestic crisis since the Civil War. The PACT program is in crisis because of the stock market. Prosperity- moving up in the ranks of wealth.
The Boom Investors did not have money to purchase stock. They bought on margin When I dont have lunch money, I buy on credit
The Crash Stock prices fell. Black Thursday Brokers - people who sell stock.
Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2
The Great Depression
Unbalanced Economy
Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3
Credit Crisis
Unbalanced Economy
Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4
Joblessness/Poverty
Investors began selling stocks.
16
Chunk 2 The Great Depression and
Unbalanced Economy
  • Read Chunk 2 with a partner.
  • Work with your partner and lift information from
    the text onto the graphic organizer Yall Do.

17
Topic Cause Effect Connections Vocabulary
Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1
The Stock Market The value of stocks plunged overnight. The U.S. entered the worst domestic crisis since the Civil War. The PACT program is in crisis because of the stock market. Prosperity- moving up in the ranks of wealth.
The Boom Investors did not have money to purchase stock. They bought on margin When I dont have lunch money, I buy on credit
The Crash Investors began selling stocks. Stock prices fell. Black Thursday Brokers people who sell stock.
Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2
The Great Depression Severe economic crisis
Unbalanced Economy Farm income shrank industries declined growing gap in wealth.
Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3
Credit Crisis
Unbalanced Economy
Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4
Joblessness/Poverty
Economic output dropped 43 in 3 years
High percent living in poverty employer cut
wages and laid off workers.
18
Chunk 3 Credit Crisis International
Depression
  • Read Chunk 3 with a partner.
  • Work with your partner and lift information from
    the text onto the graphic organizer Yall Do.

19
Topic Cause Effect Connections Vocabulary
Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1
The Stock Market The value of stocks plunged overnight. The U.S. entered the worst domestic crisis since the Civil War. The PACT program was in crisis because of the stock market. Prosperity- moving up in the ranks of wealth
The Boom Investors did not have money to purchase stock. They bought on margin When I dont have lunch money, I buy on credit
The Crash Investors began selling stocks. Stock prices fell. Black Thursday Brokers - people who sell stock
Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2
The Great Depression Economic output dropped 43 in 3 years Severe economic crisis
Unbalanced Economy Farm income shrank industries declined growing gap in wealth. High percent living in poverty employer cut wages and laid off workers.
Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3
Credit Crisis Defaulted- not making payments on loans
International Depression International trade slowed down
Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4
Joblessness/Poverty
Farmers defaulted on loans.
Banks closed
No funds available for international loans
20
Chunk 4 Joblessness and Poverty
  • Read Chunk 4 independently.
  • Lift information from the text onto the graphic
    organizer You Do.

21
Topic Cause Effect Connections Vocabulary
Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1 Chunk 1
The Stock Market The value of stocks plunged overnight. The U.S. entered the worst domestic crisis since the Civil War. The PACT program was in crisis because of the stock market. Prosperity- moving up in the ranks of wealth
The Boom Investors did not have money to purchase stock. They bought on margin When I dont have lunch money, I buy on credit
The Crash Investors began selling stocks. Stock prices fell. Black Thursday Brokers - people who sell stock
Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2 Chunk 2
The Great Depression Economic output dropped 43 in 3 years Severe economic crisis
Unbalanced Economy Farm income shrank industries declined growing gap in wealth. High percent living in poverty employer cut wages and laid off workers.
Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3 Chunk 3
Credit Crisis Farmers defaulted on loans. Banks closed Defaulted- not making payments on loans
International Depression No funds available for international loans. International trade slowed down
Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4 Chunk 4
Joblessness/Poverty
People were struck by poverty living in old
boxes, standing in soup lines.
Millions lost their jobs.
22
One Pager
  • Step 1 Draw an image that connects the text to
    social
  • and economic issues that are
    happening today.
  • Step 2 Choose five key words from the text and
    place
  • them anywhere around the picture.
  • Step 3 Choose two statements from the text.
    Write these
  • at the bottom of your work.
  • Step 4 Look at the image, key words, and
    statements.
  • Write a summarizing statement that
    expresses the
  • meaning on your page.

23
Social Studies Lesson Plan
  • Outcome
  • The students will be able to identify the causes
    and effects of the Great Depression and relate
    the events to modern economic times.
  • Before Think-Write-Pair-Share
  • Purposes establish a purpose for reading make
    connections
  • During Cause/effect graphic organizer
  • Purposes engage with the text organize
    information guide discussion
  • After One Pager
  • Purposes create mental imagery identify key
    vocabulary summarize

24
STRATEGIC TEACHING
  • Strategic teaching is the use of multiple and
    connected instructional strategies and engagement
    practices to ensure the comprehension, retention,
    and application of content material.

25
What Makes It Visible?
  • ALL of the following FIVE components will be
    seen in every strategic lesson.
  • Daily outcome(s)
  • Instructional practices talking and chunking
  • A lesson structure that includes before, during,
    and after strategies
  • Explicit instruction - I Do, We Do, Yall Do, You
    Do (combination varies daily as needed)
  • Active literacy - reading, writing, talking,
    listening, and investigating

26
How Do Teachers Make It Happen?
  • Through purposeful planning, teachers
  • Determine the content to be learned based on
    state and local standards
  • Choose strategies based on the purpose of the
    lesson and the nature of the material being
    studied
  • Consider the needs of the learners based on
    academic data and adolescent brain research

27
Feature Analysis Matrix
  • Read the scenarios and, using the feature
    analysis matrix, determine if there is evidence
    of strategic teaching based on the five
    components.

28
Applying Strategies
  • A variety of strategies can be applied to support
    this lesson framework.
  • Strategies should be purposefully chosen to
    incorporate literacy skills into the content
    areas.
  • The semantic feature analysis is a tool used to
    show the connection between literacy strategies
    and literacy skills.

29
BREAK
30
Steering in the Right Direction
31
Introduction to Peer Coaching
32
Introduction to Peer Coaching Lesson
  • Outcome Participants will examine the components
    of peer coaching and demonstrate understanding
    through reading, writing, and discussion.
  • Before Name It!
  • During Text Says I Think
  • After Carousel

33
Before Name It!
  • Think of a time when you have been coached or you
    have served in a coaching role.
  • Jot notes about this experience. Who was the
    coach? What did the coaching look like? How
    did you feel about the experience? What was the
    outcome?

34
Why Peer Coaching?
  • Teachers look to peers as first line of support.
  • It is consistent with principles of highly
    effective professional development.
  • It expands the capacity of the building staff.
  • It facilitates teamwork.

35
Why Peer Coaching
36
Introduction to Peer Coaching
37
During Text SaysI Think
  • When reading the text,
  • 1. Think about what each chunk says and then on a
    sticky note, label and write questions, concerns,
    or comments about each component of peer
    coaching.
  • 2. Talk at your table about what you have
    written.

38
CHUNK 1 UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS
  • Think about what chunk 1 says and then on a
    sticky note, label and write questions, concerns,
    or comments.
  • Talk at your table about what you read.

39
Coaching Cycle A Continuum for On-Going
Professional Development Always Begin with Data
  • Pre-Planning
  • Planning with Teacher
  • Modeling for Teacher
  • Reflection
  • Debrief
  • Pre-Planning
  • Planning with Teacher
  • Side-by-Side Practice
  • Reflection
  • Debrief
  • Pre-Planning
  • Planning with Teacher
  • Teacher Practice
  • Reflection
  • Debrief

40
CHUNK 2DESCRIPTORS NON -DESCRIPTORS
  • Think about what chunk 2 says and then on a
    sticky note, label and write questions, concerns,
    or comments.
  • Talk at your table about what you read.

41
CHUNK 3 ELEMENTS OF SUCCESSFUL PEER COACHING
  • Think about what chunk 3 says and then on a
    sticky note, label and write questions, concerns,
    or comments.
  • Talk at your table about what you read.

42
CHUNK 4 POTENTIAL BARRIERS TO PEER COACHING
  • Think about what chunk 4 says and then on a
    sticky note, label and write questions, concerns,
    or comments.
  • Talk at your table about what you read.

43
CHUNK 5 BEFORE YOU JUMP IN, YOU NEED TO
CONSIDER.
  • Think about what chunk 5 says and then on a
    sticky note, label and write questions, concerns,
    or comments.
  • Talk at your table about what you read.

44
After Carousel
  • Place your sticky notes on the corresponding
    charts.
  • Return to your table.
  • Participants number from 1 to 5 to form groups.
  • Carousel around the charts noticing the
    statements.
  • Discuss with your group any wonders or light
    bulb moments.

45
Introduction to Peer Coaching Lesson
  • Outcome Participants will examine the components
    of peer coaching and demonstrate understanding
    through reading, writing, and discussion.
  • Before Name It!
  • Purposes activate prior knowledge establish a
    purpose for the lesson
  • During Text Says I Think
  • Purposes engage with text make connections
  • After Carousel
  • Purposes respond through discussion
    integrating new knowledge with prior knowledge

46
LUNCHTIME
47
Collaborative Leadership
  • The most effective way to forge a winning team
    is to call on the players need to connect with
    something larger than themselves.Ive discovered
    that when you free players to use all their
    resources mental, physical, and spiritual an
    interesting shift in awareness occurs. When
    players practice what is known as mindfulness
    simply paying attention to whats actually
    happening not only do they play better and win
    more, they also become more attuned with each
    other.
  • (Phil
    Jackson, basketball coach and author of Sacred
    Hoops)

48
Content Literacy Practices2011
  • Collaborative Leadership
  • Alabama Reading Initiative

49
Five Essential Elements
50
COLLABORATIVE LEADERSHIP
51
A Working Leadership Team
  • Talent wins games, but teamwork wins
    championships.
  • - Michael Jordan

52
Change Curve
  • Think of how you personally view change.
  • Assign yourself a number from 1 to 50 - 1
    meaning you HATE change and 50 meaning you LOVE
    change.
  • Write your number on a blank sheet of paper.
  • Make a curve around the room by placing
    yourselves in numerical order.

53
Just be A TEAM Player
  • You may have the greatest bunch of individual
    stars in the world, but if they dont play
    together, the club wont be worth a dime. The
    way a team plays as a whole determines its
    success.

  • -Babe Ruth

54
Team work
  • A team is a group organized to work together to
    accomplish a set of objectives that cannot be
    achieved effectively by individuals.

55
  • NOW.
  • WHAT ARE THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF A SCHOOL
    LEADERSHIP TEAM???

56
Responsibilities of a Leadership Team
  • Team activities revolve around a decision-making
    cycle that engages teachers in questioning,
    studying, reflecting, planning, experimenting,
    monitoring, revising, and assessing instructional
    effectiveness and student progress.

57
The Leadership Team
  • The Leadership Team works with the rest of the
    faculty to develop a literacy plan based upon
    student needs as determined by multiple forms of
    data.

58
The Instructional Leaders
  • Allocate time during the year for the LT to
    collaborate regularly
  • Secure resources needed to implement team goals
  • Schedule regular grade/dept. level data meetings
  • Communicate the teams goals and roles to the
    entire faculty
  • Support and monitor strategic teaching
  • Ensure that shared teaching experiences are
    regular occurrences through monitoring and
    supporting the teams efforts
  • Schedule and support intervention efforts in the
    school
  • Allocate time for professional development
    opportunities for the faculty and monitor its
    effectiveness

59
The Team Members
  • Commit to collaborating with the team regularly
  • Analyze school and student data and share with
    faculty to inform decisions about instruction
  • Train the faculty on Content Literacy Practices
  • Practice strategic teaching in their content
    classrooms on a daily basis
  • Establish model classrooms as learning
    environments for colleagues
  • Schedule and provide shared teaching
    opportunities with colleagues
  • Support intervention efforts in the school
  • Provide professional development for the faculty

60
Sustainability?
  • What are some of the things we need to consider
    as a Leadership Team to ensure ongoing
    sustainability of this effort?

61
Keep in mindTEAM BUILDING MUST BE
  • a way of life
  • the responsibility of every Team Member
  • continuous process
  • about developing a clear and unique identity
  • focused on a clear and consistent set of goals
  • concerned with the needs and ambitions of each
    team member recognizing the unique contribution
    that each individual can make.
  • awareness of the potential of the team as a unit
  • results oriented
  • enjoyable

62
Keep in mindTEAM BUILDING MUST NOT BE
  • a short term, flavor of the month
  • imposed without regard to peoples feelings
  • spasmodic
  • reserved for only some members of the team
  • an excuse for not meeting personal
    responsibilities
  • a process where actions clearly contradict
    intentions
  • seen as a chore

63
(No Transcript)
64
Break
65
Stages of ImplementationTimeline/Framework
66
Stages of ImplementationOur Plan for Success
  • Stage 1 Principal and Leadership Team Learning

67
Stages of Implementation Our Plan for Success
  • Stage 2 Principal and Leadership Team
    Implementation

68
Stages 1 and 2
  • Please email your completed Stages 1 and 2 plans
    to your LEA Point of Contact and cc to
    jwarmath_at_alsde.edu
  • This communication will aid us tremendously with
    our support and follow-up.
  • Remember, this is our PLAN FOR SUCCESS

69
Exit Survey
70
Grand Finale
  • How are Content Literacy Practices most like one
    of the following, and why?
  • Choices
  • rock and roll,
  • country music,
  • classical music, and
  • rap/hip-hop

71
Leadership Self Assessment
  • Take a minute to look at yourself as a leader.
  • Do you have the qualities to make a valuable
    leader for your group?
  • Be reflective and answer the Leadership Self
    Assessment questionnaire.
  • So, I have examined my qualities as a leader,
    what next?

72
Reading The Strength of a Leadership Team
  • Code the text as you read.
  • X Key Points
  • ! Interesting Ideas
  • ? - Questions

73
Parking Lot Postings
  • Reflect on the learning from the day
  • Questions
  • Concerns
  • Comments
  • Please provide us with your Exit Survey as your
    exit slip! This is going to assist us in
    supporting your efforts.
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