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Foreign Phrases Commonly Used in English

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Title: Foreign Phrases Commonly Used in English


1
Foreign Phrases Commonly Used in English
  • Created by, Laurie Stansbury
  • ENG I

2
e.g. (exempli gratia)
  • Meaning for example
  • Origin Latin
  • Additional Info Literally for the sake of an
    example. Not to be confused with id est.
  • Example There were several type of tree in the
    forest e.g. beech, oak, birch, maple.
  • Part of Speech adverb (abbreviation)

3
RSVP
  • Meaning please reply
  • Origin French 1895-1900
  • Additional Info In French répondez sil vous
    plaît
  • Example Don't forget to RSVP before Thursday.
  • Part of Speech verb or noun

4
Déjà vu
  • Meaning illusion of having experienced something
    already
  • Origin French 1900 -1905
  • Additional Info Can refer to something which has
    in fact happened before or, more commonly, to a
    false sensation or illusion. Often carries an
    unpleasant or creepy connotation.
  • Example I had a weird feeling of déjà vu as I
    entered the old house.
  • Part of Speech noun

5
Faux pas
  • Meaning social blunder
  • Origin French 1670-80
  • Additional Info Literally false step, it is
    usually used for a breach of etiquette.
  • Example She soon realized that she had
    committed a grave faux pas.
  • Synonyms error, impropriety
  • Part of Speech noun

6
Du jour
  • Meaning of the day
  • Origin French
  • early 20c. on menus
  • Additional Info As well as meaning food prepared
    for a particular day (e.g. soup du jour), it has
    come to mean anything fashionable, current or
    trendy.
  • Example Environmentalism is the big issue du
    jour.
  • Part of Speech noun

7
Bon voyage
  • Meaning have a pleasant trip
  • Origin French 1490- 1500
  • Additional Info Used to express farewell and
    good wishes to a departing traveler.
  • Example He yelled, Bon Voyage as the ship
    pulled away from the dock.
  • Part of Speech interjection

8
Alma mater
  • Meaning ones old university or school
  • Origin Latin 1710
  • Additional Info Literally nourishing mother.
    The term also refers to a school's official song.
  • Example My alma mater keeps asking me for
    donations.
  • Part of Speech noun

9
Cum laude
  • Meaning with honor with praise
  • Origin Latin 1872
  • Additional Info used in diplomas to grant the
    lowest of three special honors for grades above
    the average.
  • Example Work hard and you can graduate cum
    laude.
  • Part of Speech adverb
  • See Also Magna cum laude (with great praise),
    summa cum laude (with highest praise)

10
Femme fatale
  • Meaning attractive, dangerous woman
  • Origin French
  • Additional Info Literally deadly woman, used
    to mean a woman likely to lead someone to ruin,
    even if not death.
  • Example She had the air of a femme fatale, and
    I was instantly on my guard.
  • Part of Speech noun

11
Esprit De Corps
  • Meaning team spirit
  • Origin French 1770-80
  • Additional Info Military in origin, but now more
    generally applied.
  • Example The sales department was well known for
    its esprit de corps.
  • Synonym camaraderie, bonding, solidarity,
    fellowship
  • Part of Speech noun

12
Verbatim
  • Meaning in exactly the same words
  • Origin Latin 1475-85
  • Additional Info skilled at recording
    word-for-word accuracy
  • Example Take down my speech verbatim.
  • Part of Speech adverb or adjective

13
E pluribus unum
  • Meaning out of many, one
  • Origin Latin
  • Additional Info It refers to the Union formed by
    the separate states. E pluribus unum was adopted
    as a national motto in 1776 and is now found on
    the Great Seal of the United States and on United
    States currency.
  • Example Im old enough to remember when the
    motto of the USA was e pluribus unum not in
    McDonalds we trust.
  • Part of Speech Phrase

14
Prima donna
  • Meaning temperamental performer first or
    principal singer in opera company
  • Origin Italian 1760-70
  • Additional Info Indicates a vain, difficult
    personality, but one who is indispensable due to
    their talent and style.
  • Example She may be good, but what a prima
    donna!
  • Part of Speech noun

15
Avant-garde
  • Meaning radically original, cutting edge
  • Origin French 1475-85
  • Additional Info Literally advance guard or
    first to attack, applied to radically innovative
    movements in the arts, sometimes with a sarcastic
    suggestion of the bizarre or incomprehensible.
  • Example It was all a bit avant-garde for my
    tastes.
  • Part of Speech noun or adjective

16
Status quo
  • Meaning current state of affairs state in which
  • Origin Latin 1825-35
  • Additional Info Sometimes used to give the
    impression of excessive safety and resistance to
    change.
  • Example Hes too comfortable with the status
    quo.
  • Part of Speech noun

17
Joie de vivre
  • Meaning joy of life
  • Origin French
  • Additional Info Implies an openness to new
    experiences and an exuberance and effervescence.
  • Example She was so full of joie de vivre that
    she was positively glowing.
  • Part of Speech noun

18
Carte blanche
  • Meaning a free hand, a blank cheque
  • Origin French 1645-55
  • Additional Info Literally white (blank) card.
  • Example He gave me carte blanche to finish it
    any way I liked.
  • Part of Speech noun

19
Caveat emptor
  • Meaning let the buyer beware
  • Origin Latin 1515-25
  • Additional Info In the absence of a warranty,
    the buyer should take care what he is buying, and
    assumes the risk of the quality of a product.
  • Example Its a reliable store, but still,
    caveat emptor.
  • Part of Speech noun

20
Alpha and omega
  • Meaning the beginning and the end
  • Origin Greek
  • Additional Info The New Testament was first
    written in Greek. Alpha is the first letter of
    the Greek aplphabetand Omega is the last letter.
  • Example In the New Testament Book of Revelation,
    God says, I am Alpha and Omega, meaning that he
    is the beginning and end of all things.
  • Part of Speech noun

21
Tabula rasa
  • Meaning empty slate
  • Origin Latin 1525-35
  • Additional Info Starting from scratch with no
    preconceptions, it can suggest open-ended or
    open-minded.
  • Example If we can start from a tabula rasa,
    then anything is possible.
  • Part of Speech noun

22
Hoi polloi
  • Meaning the masses the common people
  • Origin Greek 1815-25
  • Additional Info Carries a contemptuous and
    condescending overtone.
  • Example She never mixed with the hoi polloi.
  • Part of Speech noun

23
Ad nauseam
  • Meaning endlessly, to the point of nausea
  • Origin Latin 1616
  • Additional Info Stronger than ad infinitum, and
    with more of a sense of boredom.
  • Example She showed us holiday snaps ad
    nauseam.
  • Part of Speech adverb
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