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Global Cities, Global Citizenship: An Urban-Themed Mobility Project

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Global Cities, Global Citizenship: An Urban-Themed Mobility Project Kathi A. Ketcheson, Ph.D. Portland State University Portland, Oregon USA Description of the ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Global Cities, Global Citizenship: An Urban-Themed Mobility Project


1
Global Cities, Global Citizenship An
Urban-Themed Mobility Project
  • Kathi A. Ketcheson, Ph.D.
  • Portland State University
  • Portland, Oregon USA

2
Description of the project
  • Excellence in Mobility Project.
  • European Union-United States Atlantis Program
    from 2008 to 2012.
  • Partners University of Bologna, Italy
    University of Nottingham, UK University of
    Denver, USA Portland State University, USA.
  • Faculty and student exchanges focused on the
    study of cities in the 21st century.

3
Atlantis Program
  • Transatlantic Declaration on EU-US Relations.
  • First agreement signed 1995.
  • Renewed 2000 until 2005, the 2006 to 2013.
  • US funding ended in 2012.

4
Types of projects
  • Transatlantic Degree Consortia Projects (TD)
    dual/double or joint degree programs included
    mobility funds for students and faculty.
  • Excellence in Mobility Projects (EIM)
    short-term, transatlantic mobility, students and
    faculty.
  • Policy-oriented Measures (POM) collaboration in
    higher education and vocational training.

5
Funding
  • Six EIM, eight TD, and two POM projects funded in
    2008.
  • Global Cities 180,000 divided among four
    partners no-cost extension to 2013.
  • Students 5000 or 5,000 for four months.
  • Faculty 3,500 up to two weeks.
  • Administrators 3,000 up to two weeks.

6
Themes
  • Demographic
  • Socioeconomic
  • Spatial
  • Ecological
  • Aesthetic

7
Goals
  • Inter-institutional and interdisciplinary
    learning and community engagement.
  • Interdisciplinary perspectives on sustainable
    urban futures.
  • Common curricular focus.
  • Continuing relationships.

8
Student mobility
  • 48 students over four years, divided evenly among
    institutions.
  • Courses within five urban themes, offered in
    English.
  • Internship or community-based learning component.
  • US students complete two weeks of language
    training in Bologna.

9
Faculty mobility
  • Five faculty members from each institution.
  • Stipends for up to two weeks stay abroad.
  • Lectures and presentations.
  • Establish collaboration beyond the grant period.

10
Proposed student mobility
  • Denver Bologna
  • 6 6
  • 6 6
  • Portland Nottingham
  • 6 6
  • 6 6

11
Actual student mobility
  • Denver Bologna
  • 9 4
  • 0 7

  • Portland Nottingham
  • 9 2
  • 3 2

12
Actual faculty mobility
Denver Bologna 2 1 2 1 Portland
Nottingham 3 0 2 1
13
Successes
  • Bologna development of new course, envisioning
    the possibility of interdisciplinary courses.
  • Nottingham curriculum review of
    interdisciplinary courses, new systems to support
    internationalization strategy.
  • Portland lasting impact on students, signing of
    formal agreements.
  • Denver new internships, transformation of
    courses.

14
Assessment
  • Required of US institutions only.
  • Pre-departure and post, returning questionnaires
    and interviews.
  • Journals reflections, weekly log of learning
    and extracurricular activities.

15
At PSU.
  • Exchange students completed power point
    presentations and reflected on their learning
    within the urban themes of the project.

16
Learning in the community
  • Lorenzo has been awarded this Certificate of
    Appreciation for making a valuable contribution
    to his project team in the development of a
    unique water passport and also for providing his
    cohort with an international perspective on
    drinking water.
  • Michael P. Stuhr, Chief Engineer,
  • Portland Water Bureau

17
What students had to say
  • Not only did the education I receivedfit in
    with my educational
  • goals, but the substantial financial support
    allowed studying
  • abroad to become a possibility
  • I was thrown head-first into Italian culture, as
    well as other
  • culturesThese connections with Italians and
    people around the
  • world became priceless to me.
  • I can say with absolute surety that the city
    itself has been the
  • most informative classroom of all.

18
Challenges
  • Bologna Limited resources and time establishing
    interdisciplinary collaboration among faculties.
  • Nottingham Negotiating departmental cultures
    short funding period.
  • Portland Limited funding and short funding
    period assessing organizational differences
    among institutions.
  • Denver Ambiguous learning environment
    administrative transitions.

19
Overall challenges
  • Competing study abroad opportunities for
    students.
  • Lack of urban-themed courses.
  • Difficulty in engaging faculty across
    disciplines.
  • Not enough courses in English.
  • Small number of students.
  • Students language competency.

20
Overall challenges--continued
  • Semester vs. quarter systems.
  • Transferability of credits to specific programs
    of study.
  • One-semester internships.
  • Staff changes.
  • Loss of influential leader.

21
Lessons learned
  • Designate coordinators.
  • Involve faculty from the beginning.
  • Facilitate and host faculty visits.
  • Obtain campus leadership and international
    affairs support.

22
Postscript Is Europe Passé?
  • Atlantis de-funded by USDOE.
  • as Western universities struggle to establish
    substantial partnerships and branch campuses in
    emerging nations, traditional partners may regain
    some appeal. Chronicle, Aug. 2, 2013.
  • Go beyond bilateral agreements to rethink the
    global century.
  • Trilateral or multilateral agreements?
  • What do you think? Examples?

23
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24
Questions?
  • Please contact
  • Kathi A. Ketcheson
  • ketchesonk_at_pdx.edu
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