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THE GREAT DEPRESSION OF THE 1930

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... I d advise against leaving the book around home. It has Tobacco Road looking as pure as Charlotte Bronte, when it comes to obscene, vulgar, lewd, ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: THE GREAT DEPRESSION OF THE 1930


1
THE GREAT DEPRESSION OF THE 1930S
  • Brother can you spare a dime?

2
The Roaring Twenties
  • A time of wealth and excess.
  • Thousands of Americans migrated to the cities
    with the hopes of finding a more prosperous life
  • Rise of consumerism
  • Automobiles, clothing, radio, movies

3
Signs of Trouble
  • More people than ever before were investing in
    the stock market, hoping to make a large profit
  • By the late 20s, production had already declined
    and unemployment had risen, leaving stocks in
    great excess of their real value

4
STOCK MARKET CRASH OF 1929
  • Black Thursday, October 24,
    1929
  • The market lost 11 of its value at the opening
    bell on very heavy trading
  • Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929
  • about sixteen million shares were traded, and the
    Dow lost an additional 12

5
Fallout
  • People who have invested in the stock market lose
    everything
  • 14 million Americans are jobless (almost 1/3 the
    workforce)
  • Banks foreclose on houses and farms
  • No food, no clothes, no jobs

6
DUST BOWL (DUST STORMS) OF THE SOUTHERN PLAINS
1934-1935
7
Causes
  • Severe drought
  • Extensive plowing of topsoil in the 20s
  • Conversion of arid grasslands to cultivated farm
    land
  • Deep rooted grasses removed

8
Black SundayApril 14, 1935
  • 24 hours of a blinding dust storm
  • Dreaded black-blizzard covers entire disaster
    area
  • Drought adds further devastation

9
THE VICTIMS OF THE DUST BOWL
  • Colorado
  • Kansas
  • Oklahoma
  • New Mexico
  • Texas
  • Devastation of their cropland
  • Respiratory health issues
  • Unsanitary living
  • Rampant crime
  • Debt-ridden families

10
Okies
  • Land ruined, no jobs or opportunities
  • Mass exodus to California
  • Migrant workers become source of cheap labor
  • Conditions are no better elsewhere

11
The Grapes of Wrath
  • Published in 1939
  • John Steinbeck was interested in the struggles of
    the Okies and those displaced by the Great
    Depression
  • Example of American Realism

12
Banned
  • By the San Jose Public Library (June 1939) as
    unfit for patrons
  • By the Kern County Board of Supervisors from
    schools and libraries (August 1939) for being
    filled with profanity, lewd, foul and obscene
    language unfit for use in American homes . . . It
    has offended our citizenry by falsely implying
    that many of our fine people are a low, ignorant,
    profane and blasphemous type living in a vicious
    and filthy manner.
  • By the Kansas City Board of Education (August
    1939) from schools.

13
Burned
  • On the curb by the Salinas Public Library On the
    sidewalk in Bakersfield, California
  • Several other cities followed

14
Condemned
  • By the Associated Farmers (formed in 1934)
    Although the Associated Farmers will not attempt
    to have the book banned or suppressed, we would
    not want our women and children to read so vulgar
    a book. This is a matter for consideration by
    public bodies. We deny the statements in the
    book, so consequently if we were to seek for a
    ban, our motive would be attacked. . . The only
    inference that can be obtained from Steinbecks
    book is that he is proposing exactly the same
    sort of overthrow of the present form of
    government and the substitution of collective
    agriculture as did Carey McWilliams in his
    Factories in the Fields. (August 1939)
  • By the Oklahoma City Times Any reader who has
    his roots planted in the red soil will boil with
    indignation over the bedraggled, bestial
    characters that will give Reading The Grapes of
    Wrath Susan Shillinglaw, San José State
    University See other side Tom Joad the ignorant
    east convincing confirmation of their ideas of
    the people of the southwest . . . if you have
    children, Id advise against leaving the book
    around home. It has Tobacco Road looking as pure
    as Charlotte Bronte, when it comes to obscene,
    vulgar, lewd, stable language.

15
Homework Leaving Town
  • You suddenly have to leave your house or
    apartment. You must leave your belongings behind,
    and, aside from a few clothes, you can take only
    four of your possessions. What would you take?
    Keep in mind that you will be on the road and
    wont be allowed to take anything that wont fit
    in the trunk of your car. In a letter to a
    friend, identify these possessions. Then explain
    what those items mean to you and why you chose as
    you did. Are you taking them for sentimental
    reasons? Because they are practical? Because they
    are fun? Include your feelings about the items
    you had to leave behind and any sadness, anger,
    or frustration that you felt.
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