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Chapter 1 We the People

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Chapter 1 We the People Section 1: Civics in Our Lives Section 2: Who Are U.S. Citizens? Section 3: The American People Today Quiz Review Test SECTION 3 Minority ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Chapter 1 We the People


1
Chapter 1 We the People
  • Section 1 Civics in Our Lives
  • Section 2 Who Are U.S. Citizens?
  • Section 3 The American People Today

Quiz
Review Test
2
Section 1 Civics in Our Lives
  • The Main Idea
  • As a U.S. citizen, it is your duty to help
    preserve freedom and to ensure justice and
    equality for yourself and all Americans.
  • Reading Focus
  • Why do we study civics?
  • What are the values that form the basis of the
    American way of life?
  • What are the roles and qualities of a good
    citizen?

3
Why Study Civics?
Section 1 Civics in Our Lives
Latin word civis means citizen
What it means to be an American citizen
  • Civics-- study of citizenship and government
  • Citizen-- is a legally recognized member of a
    country
  • have rights and responsibilities that differ from
    country to country
  • Government-- is the organizations, institutions,
    and individuals who exercise political authority
    over a group of people

Originated with the Greeks adopted by the Romans
(Nation)
Authority that acts on behalf of a group of people
4
Why Study Civics cont.
  • Citizenship includes being a productive and
    active member of society.
  • Americans are also citizens of their state
    local governments

5
civics
citizen
government
6
Section 1 Civics in Our Lives
  • The Main Idea
  • As a U.S. citizen, it is your duty to help
    preserve freedom and to ensure justice and
    equality for yourself and all Americans.
  • Reading Focus
  • Why do we study civics?
  • What are the values that form the basis of the
    American way of life?
  • What are the roles and qualities of a good
    citizen?

7
American Values
Section 1 Civics in Our Lives
Ideas that people hold dear try to live by
  • Equality, liberty, and justice for all people
  • Foundation of our rights and freedoms
  • Model for other countries
  • Equality- all people are equal under the law
  • Liberty- Freedom
  • Justice- Govt. protects your rights

8
American Values
Section 1 Civics in Our Lives
  • Freedom and equality are protected by laws.
  • Citizens share in protecting liberties.
  • Citizens are guaranteed an education and equal
    opportunity of employment.
  • Citizens must respect the rights of others.

(freedoms)
Pursue their dreams
9
Values
Equality, Liberty Justice
10
Section 1 Civics in Our Lives
  • The Main Idea
  • As a U.S. citizen, it is your duty to help
    preserve freedom and to ensure justice and
    equality for yourself and all Americans.
  • Reading Focus
  • Why do we study civics?
  • What are the values that form the basis of the
    American way of life?
  • What are the roles and qualities of a good
    citizen?

11
Qualities of a good citizen
Section 1 Civics in Our Lives
One of the most important responsibilities of a
citizen
  • Voting
  • Government or political participation
  • Informing officials of needs or disagreements
  • Studying civics to understand the government
  • Respecting the rights of others
  • Responsibly using natural resources

Respects obeys the laws
Recycling
Responsible family members
12
Section 1
Question What ideals form the basis of the U.S.
government and the American way of life?
American Ideals
  • Freedom
  • Equality

13
people
are responsible family members
respect and obey laws
respect the rights and property of others
are loyal to their country and proud of its
accomplishments
take part in and improve life in their communities
take an active part in their government
use natural resources wisely
are well informed on important issues and are
willing to take a stand on these issues when
conscience demands it
believe in equality of opportunity for all people
respect individual differences, points of view,
and ways of life that are different from their own
14
Section 2 Who Are U.S. Citizens?
  • The Main Idea
  • Throughout history, immigrants have brought their
    languages, ideas, beliefs, hopes, and customs to
    the United States. Their ways of life are
    constantly mixing with and influencing the
    culture of Americans who came before.
  • Reading Focus
  • Who are Americans, and from where did they
    come?
  • What changes have occurred in U.S. immigration
    policy since the early 1800s?
  • How does a person become a U.S. citizen?

Americans are primarily immigrants or descendents
of immigrants
15
Americans Are from Everywhere
Section 2 Who Are U.S. Citizens?
  • With the exception of Native Americans, all of us
    can trace our familys roots to another country.
  • melting pot v. salad bowl
  • Immigrantspeople who come here from other
    countries
  • People from Siberia settled in North America
    12,00040,000 years ago.
  • 1492Christopher Columbus claimed land for Spain.
  • Spanish, French, British, Dutch, Swedish, and
    Africans (slaves) settled in America.

To settle as a permanent resident
Asia
Settled the original 13 colonies
16
X
F
17
Section 2 Who Are U.S. Citizens?
  • The Main Idea
  • Throughout history, immigrants have brought their
    languages, ideas, beliefs, hopes, and customs to
    the United States. Their ways of life are
    constantly mixing with and influencing the
    culture of Americans who came before.
  • Reading Focus
  • Who are Americans, and from where did they
    come?
  • What changes have occurred in U.S. immigration
    policy since the early 1800s?
  • How does a person become a U.S. citizen?

18
Immigration Policy
Section 2 Who Are U.S. Citizens?
Limit placed on the number of immigrants who may
enter the U.S. each year.
  • 1880srestrictions placed on immigration in
    response to wage issues
  • 1920sLimits on yearly immigration quotas set
    for particular countries
  • Immigration Act of 1990cap set at 675,000
    immigrants per year
  • Gives preference to three groups of people
  • Husbands, wives, and children of U.S. citizens
  • People who have valuable job skills
  • Aliens Permanent residents of the U.S. who are
    still citizens of another country

1995
19
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20
F
A
x
D
21
Section 2 Who Are U.S. Citizens?
  • The Main Idea
  • Throughout history, immigrants have brought their
    languages, ideas, beliefs, hopes, and customs to
    the United States. Their ways of life are
    constantly mixing with and influencing the
    culture of Americans who came before.
  • Reading Focus
  • Who are Americans, and from where did they
    come?
  • What changes have occurred in U.S. immigration
    policy since the early 1800s?
  • How does a person become a U.S. citizen?

22
Becoming a U.S. Citizen
Section 2 Who Are U.S. Citizens?
  • Native-Born Born in the U.S.
  • States and territories
  • To American parents
  • Naturalization Process by which an alien becomes
    a U.S. citizen
  • same rights and duties as native-born
  • when a parent is naturalized, his or her children
    automatically become citizens as well
  • Cannot be Pres. or V.P

23
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24
Becoming a U.S. Citizen
Section 2 Who Are U.S. Citizens?
  • Legal Aliens
  • a citizen of another country who has received
    permission to enter the U.S.
  • Most come to visit or to attend school
  • cannot serve on juries, vote, or hold public
    office
  • aliens must carry a green card at all times
  • Illegal Immigrants
  • Undocumented residents

Are protected by U.S. Laws
Aliens
25
Becoming a U.S. Citizen
Section 2 Who Are U.S. Citizens?
  • Refugees
  • not included in Quotas
  • people who are trying to escape dangers in their
    home countries
  • usually fleeing persecution, wars, political
    conflicts, and other crisis situation

26
Section 2
Question What are the benefits of U.S.
citizenship?
27
F
A
D
C
B
E
28
enter United States legally recieve green card be
a resident for five years apply for citizenship
have fingerprints taken be interviewed and take
tests take Oath of Allegiance
29
Section 3 The American People Today
  • The Main Idea
  • The U.S. population continues to grow and change
    today.
  • Reading Focus
  • Why is the census important?
  • In what ways does population grow and change?
  • What has changed about the American population
    over the years?
  • For what reasons have Americans moved and settled
    in new areas over the course of U.S. history?

30
Census Information
Section 3 The American People Today
  • Determines how many people each state has in the
    House of Representatives
  • Shows population growth and decline for different
    areas
  • Reports how many children each family has
  • Helps government, businesses, and individuals
    plan for the future

31
Section 3
Question Why is census information important?
Who Uses It
How They Use It
government
to plan the budget
to fill the needs of the market
businesses
to write books and reports
individuals
32
Populations grow by
Section 3 The American People Today
  • Natural increase
  • Adding new territories
  • Immigration

33
Changes in the movement of Americans
Section 3 The American People Today
  • The first census found the majority of Americans
    living on farms and rural areas.
  • 1830urban areas were growing faster than rural
    areas
  • 1920more Americans lived in cities than in rural
    areas
  • Mid-1900ssuburbs developed around crowded cities
  • Today there are more people living in suburbs
    than in cities.
  • Migration to the Sunbelt increased during the
    1980s1990s.

34
SECTION 3
Minority Group Conditions / Concerns
African Americans making gains toward equality, but statistics still show members are lagging in education, employment, and income becoming more politically active
Hispanics rapidly growing population trailing in income and education diverse population
Asian Americans contrast between first-generation immigrants, who are often poor, and second-generation, many of whom succeed educationally and financially viewed as "model minority," although this term is resented
American Indians often live on reservations high poverty and poor education encouraged to assimilate taking steps to establish sources of income and better schools
White Ethnics includes some who assimilate quickly and others who remain victims of prejudice and discrimination making gains in religious tolerance good education level
35
Chapter 1 Wrap-Up
1. Why do people study civics? 2. What principles
and ideals form the foundation of the American
system of government? 3. How has U.S. immigration
policy changed since the early 1800s? 4. What
benefits do people derive from being a citizen of
the United States? 5. Identify three ways that
the populations of countries increase. 6. How
have migration patterns shifted from the 1800s to
the present?
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